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Athy

Yorkshire pudding tin question.

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5 hours ago, Athy said:

The evening nosh is also known as "tea" in parts of the North - well they can't call it "dinner", can they?

Then, just to complicate matters, there's high tea.

One country divided by a common language, and long may it remain so.

Its numpty suvvern language. Its breakfast, dinner then tea..........always has been always will be. As a kid I took DINNER money to school for my Dinner at dinner time then had tea late afternoon at home. My grandkids in Cornwall and Dorset ( very south but not laaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaandan ) take dinner money each day to school and I bet kids daarn the saarf eeest take dinner money to school so there you go. Breakfast, dinner, tea.

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2 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Its numpty suvvern language. Its breakfast, dinner then tea..........always has been always will be. As a kid I took DINNER money to school for my Dinner at dinner time then had tea late afternoon at home. My grandkids in Cornwall and Dorset ( very south but not laaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaandan ) take dinner money each day to school and I bet kids daarn the saarf eeest take dinner money to school so there you go. Breakfast, dinner, tea.

...and are you familiar with the term "high tea"?

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1 minute ago, Athy said:

...and are you familiar with the term "high tea"?

Yes its what the knobs in places such as Windsor have.

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I'll bow to your superior knowledge on that point. But for us it was a tea which was more than just the usual sandwiches and cake: beans on toast or ham & egg for example. The expression was certainly used in Sheffield and in North Derbyshire, whether it spread outside there I don't know.

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46 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Its numpty suvvern language. Its breakfast, dinner then tea..........always has been always will be. As a kid I took DINNER money to school for my Dinner at dinner time then had tea late afternoon at home. My grandkids in Cornwall and Dorset ( very south but not laaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaandan ) take dinner money each day to school and I bet kids daarn the saarf eeest take dinner money to school so there you go. Breakfast, dinner, tea.

When I was in infants' school, in the south, my parents were visited by a school inspector.  Although I went home at lunchtime/dinner time, I had told the teacher I didn't have dinner at home.  It was eventually sorted when it was explained that to my family, 'dinner' was the main meal in the evening, which my parents had after I had gone to bed. I had 'lunch' midday and tea in the evening.

 

ETA:  and a special treat after Sunday lunch was left over yorkshires with butter, sugar and cream.

Edited by dor

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I wonder if part of the reason the baking and pudding tins weren't wash is because they had a tendency to go rusty in their nooks and crannies if they weren't dried properly. I only remember my Nan washing tins and trays after my older cousins had had cooking lessons (prolly cos of mishaps) and then she would put them on the Aga/Rayburn type range to make sure they were fully dry before storing them. 

 

I seem to be slightly bilingual because as I was growing up my Nan would say treacle and my Granny would say syrup, so now when I hear a person with Scottish accent say treacle I automatically think black treacle from a red tin and when I hear someone with an English accent say treacle, with out missing a beat I think golden form a green tin.  

 

I love Yorkshire puds (I mean why else would you go to all that hassle to make a Sunday roast if not to accompany your Yorkshire puddings) but I haven't had them for a while - So if any body has a good recipe for gluten free Yorkshire puds I would be forever in your debt.  :D

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

.  

 

I love Yorkshire puds (I mean why else would you go to all that hassle to make a Sunday roast if not to accompany your Yorkshire puddings) but I haven't had them for a while - So if any body has a good recipe for gluten free Yorkshire puds I would be forever in your debt.  :D

 

 

A quick look at the Search Engine Of Your Choice should reveal several - whether they're good or not, only tasting will tell.

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Just now, Athy said:

whether they're good or not, only tasting will tell.

Some times my gluten free baking ends up a little like sawdust - and needs a little tweaking to get it just right. I'm not very good at the tweaking. :)

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1 minute ago, Machpoint005 said:

I know there's no gluten in sawdust but can't you use something else??

Maybe that's were I've been going wrong.  ?

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27 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

 

I seem to be slightly bilingual because as I was growing up my Nan would say treacle and my Granny would say syrup, so now when I hear a person with Scottish accent say treacle I automatically think black treacle from a red tin and when I hear someone with an English accent say treacle, with out missing a beat I think golden form a green tin. 

 

 

And then "treacle tart" was always made with golden syrup.

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7 minutes ago, dor said:

 

And then "treacle tart" was always made with golden syrup.

Yes it was, even if my Scottish granny made it.  I don't remember anybody calling it syrup tart. 

 

E.T.A. I keep referring to my grandparents cooking because my mother ....... was very good at other things. :huh:

Edited by Tumshie

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37 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

Some times my gluten free baking ends up a little like sawdust - and needs a little tweaking to get it just right. I'm not very good at the tweaking. :)

I have to ask cos Im like that. Are you realy Allergic to gluten and has your doctor confirmed it or are you part of the modern fad? I only ask as most gluten free food is absolutely gopping and i would certainly avoid anything meant to have gluten in thats been adapted as they simply dont work such as gluten free bread which is just wrong. ?

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12 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

I have to ask cos Im like that. Are you realy Allergic to gluten and has your doctor confirmed it or are you part of the modern fad? I only ask as most gluten free food is absolutely gopping and i would certainly avoid anything meant to have gluten in thats been adapted as they simply dont work such as gluten free bread which is just wrong. ?

I can understand why you would ask - It really does seem to be a nutty fad mostly in America. 

 

I do have a real issue with gluten and I'm lucky that my doctor was very supportive about getting me the right testing and with giving good and sensible advice. 

 

The first symptoms that I had were not what I would have thought of as a reaction to gluten - at first I had terrible joint pain and some times difficulty breathing / shortness of breath. 

Edited by Tumshie

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Just now, Tumshie said:

I can understand why you would ask - It really does seem to be a nutty fad mostly in America. 

 

I do have a real issue with gluten and I'm lucky that my doctor was very supportive about getting me the right testing and with giving good and sensible advice. 

 

The first symptoms that I had were not what I would have thought of as a reaction to gluten - at first I had terrible joint pain and some times difficulty breathing / shortness of breath. 

Ahh. Fair play. It must be grim but at least you are not doing it for a fad as a gluten free diet is not beneficial whatsoever unless as in your case you have a genuine problem. We packed our caff up last year but found more and more people even though still in the minority asking us for gluten free cakes amongst other fads. I was with a lady yesterday who sells gluten free products from her boat but she is close to London so will probably do well :rolleyes:

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24 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Ahh. Fair play. It must be grim but at least you are not doing it for a fad as a gluten free diet is not beneficial whatsoever unless as in your case you have a genuine problem. We packed our caff up last year but found more and more people even though still in the minority asking us for gluten free cakes amongst other fads. I was with a lady yesterday who sells gluten free products from her boat but she is close to London so will probably do well :rolleyes:

For the life of me I cannot understand why people would do this with out the need to. I feel much better (in lots of ways) for giving up gluten but I think that I must have had the allergy for quite a long time before it was uncovered. I've had to rearrange quite a bit of how I cook because gluten gets everywhere. For example I can't use Colman's mustard in a jar but I can buy it in powdered form and some pubs will use frozen chips that have a coating on them that contains gluten - you can't see it before or after cooking so unless you check the ingredients you would never know, waiting staff (bless 'um) never really check the ingredients.  :D From my point of view -if  the people who are just following a fad make food service staffs' life more difficult then it's people like me who will suffer because the waiting staff have run out of patience. That is a real concern for me.

Edited by Tumshie
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1 hour ago, Tumshie said:

I wonder if part of the reason the baking and pudding tins weren't wash is because they had a tendency to go rusty in their nooks and crannies if they weren't dried properly

I've just checked my nooks and crannies. All are dry and free from rust.

 

I'm no glutton for gluten. :)

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1 minute ago, rusty69 said:

All are dry and free from rust.

I am glad to hear that. :D * not making any jokes about a good oiling* :giggles:

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2 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

I have to ask cos Im like that. Are you realy Allergic to gluten and has your doctor confirmed it or are you part of the modern fad? I only ask as most gluten free food is absolutely gopping and i would certainly avoid anything meant to have gluten in thats been adapted as they simply dont work such as gluten free bread which is just wrong. ?

 

 I asked my wife to look out for bottled beers made by Brew Dog, whilst she was out shopping.

 

She came back with a selection, including "Vagabond", which is gluten free.

 

Bloody stuff brought me out in hives, turns out that I am allergic to whatever they put in it make it gluten free. ?

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Just now, cuthound said:

Bloody stuff brought me out in hives, turns out that I am allergic to whatever they put in it make it gluten free. ?

You just can't win. ?

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16 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

 

 

Bloody stuff brought me out in hives.

There's a Northern ale called Bees' Knees which I suppose would have the same effect.

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