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Athy

Yorkshire pudding tin question.

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Following the shocking recent admission by an otherwise civilised forum member that his family eats bought Yorkshire puddings rather than making their own (understandable on a boat, perhaps, but at home???), I wonder what the team thinks about Yorkshire pudding tins.

 

My Mum who, whatever else I might say about her, was an excellent plain cook, reckoned that you should never wash your Yorkshire pudding tin. I can't remember if she gave it a wipe in some way, perhaps with greaseproof paper, before putting it back in the cupboard, but certainly it never went in with the washing up. She reckoned that this improved the quality of the puds in some way, though I must admit that I never found out how.

 

So, quite recently we bought a new Yorkshire pudding tin. I (who usually cook) reckon that it should not be washed up after use; Mrs. Athy (who usually washes up) insists that it should, so of course it is.

 

My question is, or rather my questions are, does it make any difference, and has anyone else heard that you shouldn't wash the tin up?

 

 

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So, we wash the tin.  Why you would not I find hard to understand so would appreciate the logic.  Our Yorkshire’s, both the large one for dinner in a Yorkshire and smaller ones are most impacted by oven temp and we have just about got that cracked, although once in a while they go flat, I think due to not enough whisking.

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4 minutes ago, NB Lola said:

So, we wash the tin.  Why you would not I find hard to understand so would appreciate the logic.  Our Yorkshire’s, both the large one for dinner in a Yorkshire and smaller ones are most impacted by oven temp and we have just about got that cracked, although once in a while they go flat, I think due to not enough whisking.

Your problem most likely is trying to make a Yorky pud with southern eggs? A Yorky pud can only be made with eggs from Yorkshire birds.

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I make my own Yorkshires every weekend, million times better than bought ones but then some people buy grated cheese in packs, how busy is their life if they dont have time to grate cheese? I make mine in a convection microwave so door is not opened at all resulting in even temperature. Never heard of not washing the tin but i have heard that you should not wash a Wok. My wife is Albanian and her family had never seen a Yorkshire pud until i made them, now they are a favorite at meals in my house.

3 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Your problem most likely is trying to make a Yorky pud with southern eggs? A Yorky pud can only be made with eggs from Yorkshire birds.

I am about 2000 miles further south than you and my puds are great.😋

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I can understand the logic of not washing old tins however these days the tin is probably mon-stick so washing it is ok. 

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9 minutes ago, NB Lola said:

So, we wash the tin.  Why you would not I find hard to understand.

A politician's answer! You are asking, or at least suggesting, the question which I asked in the first place.

But why "So"? That would normally follow an explanation.

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If the Yorkshire pudding has cooked properly and not stuck to the tin then there should be no need to wash the tin.

 

Stick it back in the oven ready for the next pudding.

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Just now, Naughty Cal said:

If the Yorkshire pudding has cooked properly and not stuck to the tin then there should be no need to wash the tin.

 

Stick it back in the oven ready for the next pudding.

It is perhaps a Sheffield custom! Whether Mum learned the technique during her 15 years in Sheffield, or during her Derbyshire childhood, I have no idea.

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7 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Your problem most likely is trying to make a Yorky pud with southern eggs? A Yorky pud can only be made with eggs from Yorkshire birds.

Am a geordie living in Nottingham so you must be right.  Although I did live in Whitby for ten years.

3 minutes ago, Athy said:

A politician's answer! You are asking, or at least suggesting, the question which I asked in the first place.

But why "So"? That would normally follow an explanation.

Am sitting in the sun in Malta so my grammar is taking a rest 

Forgot to add, we use non stick tins.

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5 minutes ago, NB Lola said:

 

Am sitting in the sun in Malta so my grammar is taking a rest 

Forgot to add, we use non stick tins.

I don't think we have an "envious" emoticon available!

So (!) as your tin is non-stick, you don't need to wash it.

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Mrs insists we wash to maintain the integrity of the non stick, you also get splashes that stick, this impacts on the pud when removing it because the stick bit holds onto the pud.  I still wonder why the benefit of not cleaning is.

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1 minute ago, NB Lola said:

  I still wonder why the benefit of not cleaning is.

Once again, you ask exactly what I'm wondering. The mystery continues!

So far we have several people who do wash them, at least one who doesn't and one who relies on his Aunt Bessie to make the puds. But there must be, or have been, a reason that able cooks such as my Mum thought that they shouldn't.

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Our pudding tin was old and 'battered', lots of carbon around the sides but my Dad used to make Yorkshire puddings to die for, he used dripping or lard, sometimes they would rise and stick to the oven top. Lovely yellow and moist on the bottom with high crusty sides, we never had sweet puddings for afters, instead it would be Yorkshire pud with treacle! Don't ever remember it being washed. 

 

As an ex Sheffielder I'm shamed to admit we use Aunt Bessie's Yorkshire puds. 

  • Horror 1

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Just now, nb Innisfree said:

for afters, instead it would be Yorkshire pud with treacle!

Sacrilege! Should be served as a starter with gravy!

  • Haha 1

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Just now, Machpoint005 said:

Sacrilege! Should be served as a starter with gravy!

....preferably onion gravy!

 

From memory (and it's a LONG time since I tried it) it didn't make a bad sweet either, with jam as I recall, one of my aunties used to serve it like that.

 

Bluddy 'ell I'm feeling 'ungry.

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Don't think my mum ever washed the yorkie pudd tin. Lancashire lass she were.

 

But, the Lancashire Hot Pot 'pot' had to be 'decoked' after use. 

Edited by Nightwatch

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1 hour ago, Dyertribe said:

I can understand the logic of not washing old tins however these days the tin is probably mon-stick so washing it is ok. 

That is the nub of the problem, in Ye Olden Days tins were made of real tin and stuff, so you needed to build up a non stick coating: we had a family bakehouse, and only things like whisks and mixing basins were washed, the oven tins were just kept clean by use. Every tin was baked in the oven every day. most of the pie presses andcake presses had heatd elements, so they just got aquick clean after use.

It's not difficult to make Yorkshie Puddingss from a recipe, but the baking needs practice, and we don't all have a Sunday roast any more, most folks are tooo busy with hobbies and stuff  to bother, 

Edited by LadyG
  • Greenie 1

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6 minutes ago, LadyG said:

That is the nub of the problem, in Ye Olden Days tins were made of real tin and stuff, so you needed to build up a non stick coating: we had a family bakehouse, and only things like whisks and mixing basins were washed, the oven tins were just kept clean by use. Every tin was baked in the oven every day. most of the pie presses andcake presses had heatd elements, so they just got aquick clean after use.

Like a wok

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Mum never washed her old pud tins, we do wash our new fangled non-stick ones. we do put a blob of lard in the bottom and heat it first in the oven before adding the mix.

My wife is Sheffield born and bred and puts treacle on hers (so does my daughter because kids and sweet stuff), me being Huddersfield bred only have them as savoury with gravy on.

 

edit: just to add, Aunt Bessie's are the devil's work, they do not taste right at all, horrible things

Edited by Hudds Lad
Aunt Bessie warning :D

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37 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

Sacrilege! Should be served as a starter with gravy!

Ah well, I was the last of five so mum & dad were a little bit better off by the 50s so could afford not to have to do that, instead we had as much meat as we wanted. Also we could afford butter instead of marg, non of this fancy southern packaged stuff mind, proper tub butter, carved off at the grocers and wrapped in greaseproof paper. 

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Just now, Hudds Lad said:

Mum never washed her old pud tins, we do wash our new fangled non-stick ones. we do put a blob of lard in the bottom and heat it first in the oven before adding the mix.

My wife is Sheffield born and bred and puts treacle on hers (so does my daughter because kids and sweet stuff), me being Huddersfield bred only have them as savoury with gravy on.

Treacle, do you mean Golden Syrup, or Black Treacle, two different things!

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Just now, LadyG said:

Treacle, do you mean Golden Syrup, or Black Treacle, two different things!

apologies, Golden Syrup ;)

  • Happy 1

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