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On ‎17‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 18:51, AMModels said:

About 2 and a half years ago I was in a very dark place, I was at the point of taking the site down and letting everything go but kind words on this forum and some amazing (to me) offers of help and support meant that the site not only survived but it is being rewritten, its a long job, not helped in the least by my own mental health being shite most of the time, but it is happening. 

Andy - I wish I had the answer for the bad times you have, and are, experiencing but from what you wrote here you are obviously a good and brave person and has done a great deal for the boating community in general and lovers of old boats particularly.  Try not to give in to the blackness and do trust that it could get better.

 

  • Greenie 2

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11 hours ago, pete harrison said:

I have always had my motor's set up like this (counter a few inches out of the water) as it helps to minimise draught when on the move, and with a little more water under the boat it helps the boat move more efficiently.

Interesting.

A few years back now I was invited to be guest steerer of Chertsey for a couple of days.

That had its counter several inches out at the time.

I found it very slow to get going, and really rather reluctant to stop, though it was superb when actually up to speed, and not needing to stop in a hurry.

 

I must admit my preference is to run a bit deeper than that was.

(Though obviously, as you say, the deeper you are, the more you crash over in bridge holes...)

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When i bought Helvetia, the counter was about 2inches below the waterline when resting, and i kept that arrangement for a long time. Eventually, after getting fed up with constantly running aground,  I re-distributed the ballast so that the counter rested on the water line, and the bow was a little deeper in the water and the improvement was interesting,  not only did we run aground less frequently, but the boat swam better as well,

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I've always run with all ours with the counter just on the water. I've always found with it out all the prop wants to do is throw air about. i also found slow moving more a problem but it just in i find things are more responsive. ill tent to take out of gear as go threw a bridge this way i tend to find i don't disterb the rubbish in the bridge and dont hit anything.

 

a smaller prop or bigger gap between the prop and bottom of the boat and bigger gap between the uxter plate you could prob run higher out the water but all ours have had big props and not much room to spare.

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1 hour ago, billybobbooth said:

. ill tent to take out of gear as go threw a bridge this way i tend to find i don't disterb the rubbish in the bridge and dont hit anything.

A better way is to run hard to a bridge and just as you enter it you then knock back the throttle hard. The little wave that was following you catches up with you and lifts the arse end up and (generally) over any crud. This mostly works even when you are loaded and if you have a butty you will see the tow line hardly dip at all, whereas otherwise it will slack off and do its best to wrap itself round the blades.

I like blades as large as practical and to be slightly over-bladed. You might not have as much acceleration but you can stop on a sixpence. This means you can go into locks without a lot of faffing about - it's probably OK if you are pleasure boating but otherwise you just want to pass locks as quickly and efficiently as possible.

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12 minutes ago, Tam & Di said:

A better way is to run hard to a bridge and just as you enter it you then knock back the throttle hard. The little wave that was following you catches up with you and lifts the arse end up and (generally) over any crud. This mostly works even when you are loaded and if you have a butty you will see the tow line hardly dip at all, whereas otherwise it will slack off and do its best to wrap itself round the blades.

I like blades as large as practical and to be slightly over-bladed. You might not have as much acceleration but you can stop on a sixpence. This means you can go into locks without a lot of faffing about - it's probably OK if you are pleasure boating but otherwise you just want to pass locks as quickly and efficiently as possible.

My method was the same as "Tams" but as stated our boating was money making (hopefully)& had time restraints the boating of today is a different setup;

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i got use to taking out of gear as i couldnt be assed with something big getting round the prop or stopping the bolly. but yes I can see what You mean your way.

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I take the approach to a bridge with plenty wound on then quickly wind it back and knock it out of gear, with a butty in tow if the motor gets stuck then the butty will ride in to the stern and push the motor through.

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5 hours ago, Rob-M said:

I take the approach to a bridge with plenty wound on then quickly wind it back and knock it out of gear, with a butty in tow if the motor gets stuck then the butty will ride in to the stern and push the motor through.

not good for a wooden boat!

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8 hours ago, Tam & Di said:

A better way is to run hard to a bridge and just as you enter it you then knock back the throttle hard. The little wave that was following you catches up with you and lifts the arse end up and (generally) over any crud.

 

This was the only way I was able to get through many of the bridge holes on the southern Stratford last summer. Just grounded if I tried to cruise through, no matter how slow. 

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Southern Stratford slightly better this year, we never actually had to shift ballast or stopped completely but the bridge north of wet and warm  is dreadful. Flat out towards it de clutch 25 feet out and pray,the following surge will take you through.

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