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1 hour ago, haggis said:

I know that a lot of rescue centres insist on early neutering probably as the risk of joint problems in later life is more acceptable than more unplanned puppies 

Doing dog agility I am perhaps more conscious of the effects of joint problems than I used to be. Good grief, I never knew that Canine physios existed but now my competing dogs get regular check ups 

Haggis 

 

 

 

The training school were Zeus goes has suggested agility for him as the next step. I am wary as most dogs doing agility seem to be collies (Zeus reacts more to collies than any other breed) and movement (er dogs doing agility tend to move quickly).

 

So at present I am continuing with obedience,  in the early he  to better at socialising in the real world as well as at training class. 

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Agility does tend to be fast and furious and yes most of the participants are collies 

However often a dog is so focused on agility that it is oblivious to what is going on around. At training if a reactive dog is crated and the crate covered with a blanket they seldom get wound up 

 

One of my dogs is reactive but never when he is doing agility. It might be worth giving agility a try with zeus but make sure you find a trainer who will encourage you to continue using the building blocks you are using in obedience 

Haggis 

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1 hour ago, cuthound said:

 

The training school were Zeus goes has suggested agility for him as the next step. I am wary as most dogs doing agility seem to be collies (Zeus reacts more to collies than any other breed) and movement (er dogs doing agility tend to move quickly).

 

So at present I am continuing with obedience,  in the early he  to better at socialising in the real world as well as at training class. 

 

52 minutes ago, haggis said:

Agility does tend to be fast and furious and yes most of the participants are collies 

However often a dog is so focused on agility that it is oblivious to what is going on around. At training if a reactive dog is crated and the crate covered with a blanket they seldom get wound up 

 

One of my dogs is reactive but never when he is doing agility. It might be worth giving agility a try with zeus but make sure you find a trainer who will encourage you to continue using the building blocks you are using in obedience 

Haggis 

I've never done agility so perhaps Haggis can confirm this - But agility is quite popular locally and the lady who runs the training classes runs them for the very serious competition dogs and then she runs another for people who just want to do it 'fun' and a bit of socialising. The dogs who do it for 'fun' can go off to competitions but don't think necessarily compete in the same classes as the serious dogs (this is the bit I'm less sure about - how they actually categorise the classes). I know some one who has a dog that you would never believe did agility and by her own admission both her and the dog are not very good but they both love it and attend their training classes every week. 

 

Now over to Haggis to translate that into something that makes sense.  ?

 

 

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I think it is fair to say that most folk who start agility training do it for fun but they then get bitten by the bug - it is very addictive 

There are basically two types if agility shows 

Those held under the kennel club rules and "fun shows". The KC ones are much bigger and tend to be held over two days with hundreds of dogs competing 

Fun shows are much smaller and more relaxed and often competitors starting out with a new dog will do a few fun shows to give the dog ring practice 

Also agility training is  reward based and at some fun shows you can compete with your dogs favourite toy and or treats in your hand. This is not allowed at KC shows. 

In Scotland there are agility shows on almost every weekend from April to September then there are a few indoor shows over the winter 

As I said it is very addictive and is probably the fastest growing dog sport and it is non ageist  sexist or any other ist. You get folk competing from primary school age to over 80, often against one another 

Us oldies just teach our dogs to work and take commands when they are a distance from us 

Haggis 

 

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14 hours ago, haggis said:

Agility does tend to be fast and furious and yes most of the participants are collies 

However often a dog is so focused on agility that it is oblivious to what is going on around. At training if a reactive dog is crated and the crate covered with a blanket they seldom get wound up 

 

One of my dogs is reactive but never when he is doing agility. It might be worth giving agility a try with zeus but make sure you find a trainer who will encourage you to continue using the building blocks you are using in obedience 

Haggis 

 

13 hours ago, Tumshie said:

 

I've never done agility so perhaps Haggis can confirm this - But agility is quite popular locally and the lady who runs the training classes runs them for the very serious competition dogs and then she runs another for people who just want to do it 'fun' and a bit of socialising. The dogs who do it for 'fun' can go off to competitions but don't think necessarily compete in the same classes as the serious dogs (this is the bit I'm less sure about - how they actually categorise the classes). I know some one who has a dog that you would never believe did agility and by her own admission both her and the dog are not very good but they both love it and attend their training classes every week. 

 

Now over to Haggis to translate that into something that makes sense.  ?

 

 

 

12 hours ago, haggis said:

I think it is fair to say that most folk who start agility training do it for fun but they then get bitten by the bug - it is very addictive 

There are basically two types if agility shows 

Those held under the kennel club rules and "fun shows". The KC ones are much bigger and tend to be held over two days with hundreds of dogs competing 

Fun shows are much smaller and more relaxed and often competitors starting out with a new dog will do a few fun shows to give the dog ring practice 

Also agility training is  reward based and at some fun shows you can compete with your dogs favourite toy and or treats in your hand. This is not allowed at KC shows. 

In Scotland there are agility shows on almost every weekend from April to September then there are a few indoor shows over the winter 

As I said it is very addictive and is probably the fastest growing dog sport and it is non ageist  sexist or any other ist. You get folk competing from primary school age to over 80, often against one another 

Us oldies just teach our dogs to work and take commands when they are a distance from us 

Haggis 

 

 

Thanks Haggis and Tumshie.

 

You have put my mind to rest. ?

 

I will ask Jacky the trainer, if I can try Zeus at an agility class.

 

She does obedience, fun and KC classes, and competes with her own dogs (19 at the last count).

 

 

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20 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

 

 

 

 

She does obedience, fun and KC classes, and competes with her own dogs (19 at the last count).

 

 

Does she ever win or does she usually come 20th?

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31 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

 

 

Thanks Haggis and Tumshie.

 

You have put my mind to rest. ?

 

I will ask Jacky the trainer, if I can try Zeus at an agility class.

 

She does obedience, fun and KC classes, and competes with her own dogs (19 at the last count).

 

 

I think that you'll both thoroughly enjoy it, it'll be tremendous mental stimulation for Zeus and some dogs just love to have a job of work to do, it give them a sense of purpose and pride. 

 

If you do decide that it's for you it would be nice to hear about his progress. ?

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19 minutes ago, Tumshie said:

I think that you'll both thoroughly enjoy it, it'll be tremendous mental stimulation for Zeus and some dogs just love to have a job of work to do, it give them a sense of purpose and pride. 

 

If you do decide that it's for you it would be nice to hear about his progress. ?

 

Will do, however if Zeus is required to interact with other dogs, his progress can best be described glacial ?

 

If it is learning something new that doesn't involve having to change his reactiveness to other dogs, then he is pretty quick on the uptake.

 

His progress since we got him almost 3 years ago is chronicled here:

 

 

Edited by cuthound
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2 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

Will do, however if Zeus is required to interact with other dogs, his progress can best be described glacial ?

 

If it is learning something new that doesn't involve having to change his reactiveness to other dogs, then he is pretty quick on the uptake.

 

His progress since we got him almost 3 years ago is chronicled hrre:

 

 

What a handsome boy Zeus is. 

 

I have for the most part kept Border Collies, both working and rescue, and without something to think about they can get them selves in all sorts of trouble. I often wish I had a talent for writing because there are so many funny stories to tell about their escapades.  ☺️

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Who said border collies are clever?  One of mine jumped off the wrong side of the bows this morning,swam round to be hauled out then instead of doing the decent thing and moving away from me to shake, she did it right beside me 

Wet dog and owner ?

Haggis 

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We have a basically well trained (when a pup)husky that we acquired when he was 7yo, now 11yo.  He’s obedient up to a point, or totally obedient if there is food in the management’s hand. He seems never to have played with toys or balls, and ignores them completely, and out walking, if he doesn’t want to go somewhere, he just yawns and stops. If ordered to move he might , or he might lay down. This is a known husky habit, and as far as we know, ineradicable. He can be dragged along the road on his side, all 40kgs of him, and he doesn’t care how embarrassed we get :)

We did agility training with him a couple of years ago, and he got bored after a while, yawned and stopped.

Having grown up with various dogs, spaniels, collie crosses etc, it has to be said that our lovely Lobo is not interested in pleasing humans, just himself, and humans and other dogs are largely irrelevant to him.

We suspect this to be a husky character trait.

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18 minutes ago, cuthound said:

Have you tried shouting "MUSH" at him? ? 

That, and many other words, some in French , some in Anglo-Saxon.

Neighbours across the road thought for some time that his name was Youbas**rd. :)

 

 

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We have a swimming doggy now.

 

20180519_114141.jpg

 

He was a bit nervous yesterday when this picture was taken. Bit this morning he was straight in after his stick. Think the trouble we will have now is keeping him out of the water!

 

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Not wishing to be a doom monger but I would be aware that Leptospirosis can occur in dogs as well as humans.

 

"Rats are the main carrier of Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae. This bacterium is transmitted to dogs either directly through infected urine or indirectly via contact with contaminated water (ie swimming in rivers, ponds etc)."

 

http://www.pethealthinfo.org.uk/leptospirosis-in-dogs

 

Rare guaranteed, but best to be aware?

 

We swim our dog in a canine swimming pool

 An example of one in Sheffield: http://www.aquavet.co.uk/

 

 

Edited by Ray T

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