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Driverless hire boats


Dave_P
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Why the fuss. Nothing new here.  I have already got one.

Sat-Nav controlled route selector, Dash-Cam helm/bow-thruster control, obstruction recognition sensors, Forward-Neutral-Reverse engine speed regulators, and 'Parking-Sensor' type proximity control with automatic fender deployment - all linked and integrated by a computer.

The design has a few teething troubles I must  admit, the computer algorithms need further refinement. For the moment a degree of uncertainty about reliability exists whilst cruising, which means,  for peace-of-mind, it is better to have a  person at the helm to oversee proper function.

But when stationary it can be left unattended entirely alone - it works perfectly with 150% confidence.

I use it all the time when moored.

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50 minutes ago, Horace42 said:

Why the fuss. Nothing new here.  I have already got one.

Sat-Nav controlled route selector, Dash-Cam helm/bow-thruster control, obstruction recognition sensors, Forward-Neutral-Reverse engine speed regulators, and 'Parking-Sensor' type proximity control with automatic fender deployment - all linked and integrated by a computer.

The design has a few teething troubles I must  admit, the computer algorithms need further refinement. For the moment a degree of uncertainty about reliability exists whilst cruising, which means,  for peace-of-mind, it is better to have a  person at the helm to oversee proper function.

But when stationary it can be left unattended entirely alone - it works perfectly with 150% confidence.

I use it all the time when moored.

You have forgotten the depth sounder array linked to the engine speed regulators to enable accurate steerage round sharp shallow bends. The depth sounder array could be subsituted with extentsive algorithms or more advanced prediction techniques (such as Topology or neural networks) of speed through the water vs engine revs predicting depth under the prop.

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Don't be too quick to scoff. 3 years ago, on a Viking River Cruise on the Rhine, the boat had all the GPS, depth sounders and proximity sensors that 'reported' to the computerised control and set the course and speed. Granted there was also a human to supervise the operation, but much was automatic. Very impressive.

The cruise was a disappointment, as instead of cruising during the day, much was done at night and days were spent stationary with tours round the town or city. Also, because of water depth problems, two days of cruising were undertaken unloaded whilst we were ferried about by coach.

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5 minutes ago, Ex Brummie said:

Don't be too quick to scoff. 3 years ago, on a Viking River Cruise on the Rhine, the boat had all the GPS, depth sounders and proximity sensors that 'reported' to the computerised control and set the course and speed. Granted there was also a human to supervise the operation, but much was automatic. Very impressive.

The cruise was a disappointment, as instead of cruising during the day, much was done at night and days were spent stationary with tours round the town or city. Also, because of water depth problems, two days of cruising were undertaken unloaded whilst we were ferried about by coach.

Not sure I'd like to meet one in Braunston Tunnel whilst in automatic mode (no GPS there, how will it know where it is?:unsure:). I suppose if they officially make it a contact sport it'd be OK:rolleyes:

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For the size of the ship (that is what they called it), I don't think you're likely to encounter anything like it. I suppose it's only a scaled down version of an ocean going ship, but even they have pilots in confined channels. And there was always at least one man in the bridge. Incidentally, the bridge was able to be lowered  automatically for low heights, leaving just a small window to let the driver peer through.

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On 4/1/2018 at 21:57, Dr Bob said:

You have forgotten the depth sounder array linked to the engine speed regulators to enable accurate steerage round sharp shallow bends. The depth sounder array could be subsituted with extentsive algorithms or more advanced prediction techniques (such as Topology or neural networks) of speed through the water vs engine revs predicting depth under the prop.

Thanks for that. I think I might be able to adapt the winding-hole  'about-turn' function - albeit I am no good at computer coding - I am on already on medication for extensive algorithms - ones has hopes of a cure !

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45 minutes ago, Boater Sam said:

I  know of one canal boat with a depth sounder...........

I dont know of one lumpy water boat without a depth sounder...........

Even after 1 year of being on the cut,  I still look for the depth gauge. I would find one quite useful at the front and back of the boat....but then I just like toys.

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4 minutes ago, Dr Bob said:

I dont know of one lumpy water boat without a depth sounder...........

Even after 1 year of being on the cut,  I still look for the depth gauge. I would find one quite useful at the front and back of the boat....but then I just like toys.

 

I think most of the time both would read zero!

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4 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

I think most of the time both would read zero!

Not if they were set for actual water depth rather than water under the keel.:P then they would read 71 cms on my boat and 2' 4" on Mrsmelly's

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