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jenevers

Solicitors fees!

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Someone I know has just discovered that her name is not on the deeds of the house which she bought with her husband nearly 50 years ago.

Her husband died  20 years ago and she didn’t realise that the house was only registered in his name. Apparently to sort this out will cost £850.

Seems a lot to me.

 

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10 minutes ago, jenevers said:

Someone I know has just discovered that her name is not on the deeds of the house which she bought with her husband nearly 50 years ago.

Her husband died  20 years ago and she didn’t realise that the house was only registered in his name. Apparently to sort this out will cost £850.

Seems a lot to me.

 

This should have been sorted out when the husband died, as part of the distribution of his assets.

Is this just the solicitor's charge or does it also include the land registry fees for putting the property in her name?

 

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1 hour ago, jenevers said:

Someone I know has just discovered that her name is not on the deeds of the house which she bought with her husband nearly 50 years ago.

Her husband died  20 years ago and she didn’t realise that the house was only registered in his name. Apparently to sort this out will cost £850.

Seems a lot to me.

 

Twas the same with my old mums house. They bought it in 1953 when there was not the modern day concern over paper crap. Dad died in 2011 and there was no dispute over house ownership but she paid a similar sum out to clarify all the crap needed on her death. We have the original deeds with the solicitor and a copy at home so very interesting showing details back to the early 1600s andi ts various uses including an inn and two tiny cottages over the years. The solicitors fees in 2011 where more than four times what the house had cost when purchased derelict in 1953 :lol:

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3 hours ago, David Mack said:

This should have been sorted out when the husband died, as part of the distribution of his assets.

Is this just the solicitor's charge or does it also include the land registry fees for putting the property in her name?

 

It includes everything but still seems expensive to me.

I agree it should have been sorted out when her husband died. 

No point trying to bring up the fact that the solicitor at that time may have been negligent.

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58 minutes ago, jenevers said:

It includes everything but still seems expensive to me.

I agree it should have been sorted out when her husband died. 

No point trying to bring up the fact that the solicitor at that time may have been negligent.

I'm not defending solicitors per se, but I suspect that sum may include fees payable to others. Searches, LR fees, searches and Lord knows what else. They all have to be done.

Anything 'legal' is invariably expensive!

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My son has just completed his law exams. 3 years @ £9k plus 1 year @ £10k. He got a first class with distinction. This means nothing, he has got a job as a paralegal at just over £20k per annum for at least a year before he can apply for a training contract which will be a little bit more money but has a 2 year duration.

This might be why solicitors appear to charge a lot of money. Alternatively, do it yourself!

 

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1 hour ago, jenevers said:

It includes everything but still seems expensive to me.

I agree it should have been sorted out when her husband died. 

No point trying to bring up the fact that the solicitor at that time may have been negligent.

How much is the solicitors fee. It should be itemised in the quote you have had. If you haven’t had an itemised quote, something isn’t right.

id expect the fee bit for this kind of job to be around £400 + VAT. There will be a fee for registering the revised ownership, and probably a couple if other things. Searches aren’t necessary.

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23 minutes ago, Old Son said:

My son has just completed his law exams. 3 years @ £9k plus 1 year @ £10k. He got a first class with distinction. This means nothing, he has got a job as a paralegal at just over £20k per annum for at least a year before he can apply for a training contract which will be a little bit more money but has a 2 year duration.

This might be why solicitors appear to charge a lot of money. Alternatively, do it yourself!

 

You will get about as much sympathy as you would if you stated he was an Estate agent methinks :D

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My brother is a retired chartered engineer and is well used to permits & verification and has done his own conveyancing on about 8 properties over the past 20 years without any mistakes or come-backs.  In some cases the 'opposing' solicitor has tried to refuse to deal with him which was only resolved when he advised the other party (vendor or purchaser) of the matter. 

Typically, if personal visits are made to the local authority and other bodies involved in searches, in most cases the whole business can be completed within a working week, but the charlatans with a brass plate insist that it takes 6 or 8 weeks ................. and they habitually make mistakes.  My late mum used to work in the local town clerk's office and handled all search applications (before the age of computers) and confirmed that the solicitor's offices were extremely inefficient.

A rotten profession in many cases? ............  a bit like many so-called boat surveyors.   

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4 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

My brother is a retired chartered engineer and is well used to permits & verification and has done his own conveyancing on about 8 properties over the past 20 years without any mistakes or come-backs.  In some cases the 'opposing' solicitor has tried to refuse to deal with him which was only resolved when he advised the other party (vendor or purchaser) of the matter. 

Typically, if personal visits are made to the local authority and other bodies involved in searches, in most cases the whole business can be completed within a working week, but the charlatans with a brass plate insist that it takes 6 or 8 weeks ................. and they habitually make mistakes.  My late mum used to work in the local town clerk's office and handled all search applications (before the age of computers) and confirmed that the solicitor's offices were extremely inefficient.

A rotten profession in many cases? ............  a bit like many so-called boat surveyors.   

We found a house in Chipping Norton on a Monday. All completed and keys handed over the following tuesday all finalised, legal and above board.

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7 hours ago, jenevers said:

Someone I know has just discovered that her name is not on the deeds of the house which she bought with her husband nearly 50 years ago.

Her husband died  20 years ago and she didn’t realise that the house was only registered in his name. Apparently to sort this out will cost £850.

Seems a lot to me.

 

You could probably do most of the work yourself, but the Land Registry fees could be more than £400, plus another £200 for search fees depending on the value of the property.

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7 hours ago, jenevers said:

Someone I know has just discovered that her name is not on the deeds of the house which she bought with her husband nearly 50 years ago.

Her husband died  20 years ago and she didn’t realise that the house was only registered in his name. Apparently to sort this out will cost £850.

Seems a lot to me.

 

 

Sounds a bargain to me, given the potential loss of the property. But I'd say this depends much on what documentary proof exists that she really did buy it jointly with her husband. And disbursements to other parties.

Or is there a will leaving his interest in the property to her?

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13 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

Or is there a will leaving his interest in the property to her?

If there isn't a will, the default is that the spouse gets the full estate up to some quite high value, so it should not be an issue in this case - if the estate in question is above this value the lady won't be worrying about an £850 fee.

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27 minutes ago, David Mack said:

If there isn't a will, the default is that the spouse gets the full estate up to some quite high value, so it should not be an issue in this case - if the estate in question is above this value the lady won't be worrying about an £850 fee.

In intestacy spouse gets first £250k plus interest on that from date of death and half of the rest if there are kids.

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8 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

Twas the same with my old mums house. They bought it in 1953 when there was not the modern day concern over paper crap. Dad died in 2011 and there was no dispute over house ownership but she paid a similar sum out to clarify all the crap needed on her death. We have the original deeds with the solicitor and a copy at home so very interesting showing details back to the early 1600s andi ts various uses including an inn and two tiny cottages over the years. The solicitors fees in 2011 where more than four times what the house had cost when purchased derelict in 1953 

When we bought our first house in 1975 it cost £11,175. It was a straight forward purchase with only the normal legal issues arising. Our solicitor presented us with a bill for pennies short of £1000. (at the same time a work colleague paying an almost identical price for his house was charged under £400). On questioning the invoice the solicitor reached into a drawer of his desk and produced a list of recommended charges. Every one was at the top end of charges recommended.. To add insult to injury he subsequently sent an additional invoice for missed charges (postage) which took the total cost to over £1000. 

 

Solicitors, :glare::glare::glare:

 

   

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12 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

You will get about as much sympathy as you would if you stated he was an Estate agent methinks :D

I wasn't after sympathy. Some people have no idea what they are talking about and I was merely trying to explain that most solicitors spend a long time studying and a long time not earning. If these things really are that simple then why don't people get off their arse and do the work themselves rather than bleating about the cost of having a professional do it?

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13 hours ago, Old Son said:

My son has just completed his law exams. 3 years @ £9k plus 1 year @ £10k. He got a first class with distinction. This means nothing, he has got a job as a paralegal at just over £20k per annum for at least a year before he can apply for a training contract which will be a little bit more money but has a 2 year duration.

This might be why solicitors appear to charge a lot of money. Alternatively, do it yourself!

 

Although i agree with your point to a degree,  its also possible to gain a degree in arboriculture and mount up similar costs and then spend the following years doing a physically demanding job that is often dangerous, which is hard on the body and earn an average of £20 to £25000 a year

Or of course work as a local authority tree officer for a similar amount but there are less and less of these jobs now

I am in no way disparaging your sons hard work and good luck to him

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10 hours ago, Slim said:

When we bought our first house in 1975 it cost £11,175. It was a straight forward purchase with only the normal legal issues arising. Our solicitor presented us with a bill for pennies short of £1000. (at the same time a work colleague paying an almost identical price for his house was charged under £400). On questioning the invoice the solicitor reached into a drawer of his desk and produced a list of recommended charges. Every one was at the top end of charges recommended.. To add insult to injury he subsequently sent an additional invoice for missed charges (postage) which took the total cost to over £1000. 

 

Solicitors, :glare::glare::glare:

 

   

got to pay the golf club and business dinner bills somehow - and don't expect them to be working in the office for more than 20 hours a week, 'cos of the golf and dinner appointments which are part of their essential networking and marketing policies.

1 hour ago, tree monkey said:

Although i agree with your point to a degree,  its also possible to gain a degree in arboriculture and mount up similar costs and then spend the following years doing a physically demanding job that is often dangerous, which is hard on the body and earn an average of £20 to £25000 a year

Or of course work as a local authority tree officer for a similar amount but there are less and less of these jobs now

I am in no way disparaging your sons hard work and good luck to him

nail ........ head ......... :clapping:

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5 hours ago, tree monkey said:

Although i agree with your point to a degree,  its also possible to gain a degree in arboriculture and mount up similar costs and then spend the following years doing a physically demanding job that is often dangerous, which is hard on the body and earn an average of £20 to £25000 a year

Or of course work as a local authority tree officer for a similar amount but there are less and less of these jobs now

I am in no way disparaging your sons hard work and good luck to him

 

And this illustrates why solicitors get paid so much. Their job is so much duller and the consequences of getting it wrong so phenomenally expensive, that anyone with half a brain would choose arboriculture over law. The high pay is needed to attract people into the profession when there are so many more interesting and attractive occupations available.

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On 25/02/2018 at 12:43, jenevers said:

Someone I know has just discovered that her name is not on the deeds of the house which she bought with her husband nearly 50 years ago.

Her husband died  20 years ago and she didn’t realise that the house was only registered in his name. Apparently to sort this out will cost £850.

Seems a lot to me.

 

You say registered in his name, if the property is registered with the Land Registry it is a simple and cheap DIY procedure costing less than £100. If it is not reg it can still be done through the Land Registry DIY for a fraction of the solicitor costs and in the case in question does not sound very complicated.  All that is need will be the last conveyance, death cert and any Probate papers and or Will, and probably marriage cert.  The lady will have to prove identity in the usual way (money laundering regs). The Land Reg will give free advice over phone or visit by appointment on the process of registration etc.  They really are helpful but obviously won't give any legal advice.  Best of luck

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8 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

And this illustrates why solicitors get paid so much. Their job is so much duller and the consequences of getting it wrong so phenomenally expensive, that anyone with half a brain would choose arboriculture over law. The high pay is needed to attract people into the profession when there are so many more interesting and attractive occupations available.

so true.   I recall having lunch with our in-house solicitor who was 10 years my junior and earning twice as much as me.  He was really depressed and told me how much he envied engineers who had an interesting job.

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47 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

so true.   I recall having lunch with our in-house solicitor who was 10 years my junior and earning twice as much as me.  He was really depressed and told me how much he envied engineers who had an interesting job.

 

There's a lot of this about. I've lost count of the number of my customers in high powered jobs who say for two pins they'd pack it all in and do what I do for a living instead. 

I sometimes tease them by pointing out they probably wouldn't even be taking a pay cut :giggles:

(After all plumbers all earn a hundred grand a year, according to The Sun.)

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My husband died last year and the Land Registry accepted his death certificate when I asked for it just in my name. I would try to diy if possible.

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30 minutes ago, FluffyVal said:

My husband died last year and the Land Registry accepted his death certificate when I asked for it just in my name. I would try to diy if possible.

That easy route only works if both names were already on the Land Register.  In this case the house was only in her hubby's name, so it is a bit more complicated.

I'd still DIY personally, but there will be (a few hundred pounds?) fees to pay to alter the title, and all the documents will need to be provided - will, death certificate, grant of probate, personal ID etc.

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5 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

That easy route only works if both names were already on the Land Register.  In this case the house was only in her hubby's name, so it is a bit more complicated.

I'd still DIY personally, but there will be (a few hundred pounds?) fees to pay to alter the title, and all the documents will need to be provided - will, death certificate, grant of probate, personal ID etc.

 

Seconded.

£850 seems a fair price to me for a professional to do it and get it right first time given the work and disbursements involved. The OP could save a few hundred quid by DIY which would involve a LOT OF TIME researching and a significant risk of feckkin it up.

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