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Darrenroberts

Where to buy working boats

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Hi there, I was wondering if anyone knows of and websites/ specific marinas/current owners that deal in historic narrowboats. I already have one but am looking for another. So far apart from the obvious apollo duck searchs I've only found bates boat yard. All suggestions welcome. Thanks. Darren 

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Some are sold via brokers.  Rugby Boats have a couple on converted boats on their books, (and have had for a while!), and there's an unconverted one at ABNB, I think.

Other than that best advice is join the HNBC, and await each newsletter.

As you are probably aware, many change hands by word of mouth without ever being actively advertised anywhere.  You have to move in the right circles to be offered some boats, I think.

That' said it is hardly surprising that some owners go to great lengths to only sell to people they will believe are good future custodians, and hence they avoid advertising the boat on the open market.

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1 hour ago, alan_fincher said:

Some are sold via brokers.  Rugby Boats have a couple on converted boats on their books, (and have had for a while!), and there's an unconverted one at ABNB, I think.

Other than that best advice is join the HNBC, and await each newsletter.

As you are probably aware, many change hands by word of mouth without ever being actively advertised anywhere.  You have to move in the right circles to be offered some boats, I think.

That' said it is hardly surprising that some owners go to great lengths to only sell to people they will believe are good future custodians, and hence they avoid advertising the boat on the open market.

Thanks for the advice Iam a member of the historic boat club so I'll keep an eye out on there. Iam also planning on getting up to the braunston rally this year hopefully get to meet some fellow enthusiasts. Thank again 

1 hour ago, stagedamager said:

What are you looking for?

Preferably a full sized clothed with wrought iron hull. Or Maybe a woolich something bigger I can get stuck into restoring but with the possibility to work the boat carrying freight. 

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2 hours ago, Darrenroberts said:

 I already have one but am looking for another.

What boat is Priston then?

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Just now, Darrenroberts said:

Have you got any more pictures? 

Don't think so, it was on the Llangollen canal on the towpath side when I saw it.

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1 minute ago, ditchcrawler said:

Don't think so, it was on the Llangollen canal on the towpath side when I saw it.

I'll see if I can find owt out with the reg and name cheers. 

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5 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

Or the phone number in the photo ...

Found it it's a fellows boat been converted with full steel cabin no good for me unfortunately cheers tho 

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Warwickshire fly sometimes have some on brokerage, and will often know about others for sale but possibly not advertised. 

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Tidy conversion but the rear part of the cabin dioesn't look right & appears to low

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I should mention that two posts from this thread have just been reported by a "Guest". I have looked at both and found them entirely harmless. I will add that we do not take kindly to reports by anonymous "guests": if you want to report a post, you have every right to do so, but please have the decency to tell us who you are.

In this case, may I suggest that the "Guest" in question finds something better to do: playing with the traffic might be an option worth pursuing.

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You could try finding out what happened to "Tadworth" and whether owner is still looking to sell it.

At one stage he was offering it for sale here and elsewhere with no takers.

Like any that are "doer uppers" it would need a great deal spent on it, unless any work has been done since I last saw it.

Unconverted boats you might call "something I can get into restoring" come up only rarely, so people often have to take something with some kind of conversion on, and strip it off.  I can think of two former trip boats this applies to for example.  Both lovely boats now, but in each case a great deal more will have been spent to get them to where they are now, than in the original purchase.

You don't say what your skills are.  Do you have the ability (and location) to fully rebottom and refoot a working boat?  If you don't buying one in good order might well cost less overall than buying a knackered one, then paying professionals to do most of the steelwork, (particularly as it needs to be one of the very few yards experienced in historic boats, unless you want to risk ending up with a mess).

Going down the but a wreck and then use professionals route can often cost more than buying a restored boat in the first place.  Few people make money from this, IMO!

Edited by alan_fincher

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7 minutes ago, Athy said:

I should mention that two posts from this thread have just been reported by a "Guest".

I guess I'm surprised that the forum allows someone not logged in as a member to report a post.

If you can't post without going through a registration, why should it be possible to make a report on someone else's post without doing so?
 

Perhaps you need to get the technical staff to see if repoting posts can be limited only to logged in and identifiable members?

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20 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

You could try finding out what happened to "Tadworth" and whether owner is still looking to sell it.

At one stage he was offering it for sale here and elsewhere with no takers.

 

I believe Richard still has Tadworth - I saw him on it near Fenny Lock (GU) last week.

Edited by Psycloud

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12 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

I guess I'm surprised that the forum allows someone not logged in as a member to report a post.

If you can't post without going through a registration, why should it be possible to make a report on someone else's post without doing so?
 

Perhaps you need to get the technical staff to see if repoting posts can be limited only to logged in and identifiable members?

"You" as in "I" or as in "one/ people"?

It has been raised before. I share your surprise.

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2 minutes ago, Psycloud said:

I believe Richard still has Tadworth - I saw him on it near Fenny Lock (GU) last week.

Is he still trying to sell it, then, or keeping it?

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5 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

Is he still trying to sell it, then, or keeping it?

or just block the canal with it....

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Not sure - it was tied up against another boat but I didn't see the For Sale sign that it has previously adorned.

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1. Buy what is essentially a wreck. This will probably be very cheap. You’ll then have the option of doing it up gradually, getting professional help when required – e.g. new baseplate, footings etc. Or you might decide to hand the boat over to one of the few yards that can deal with historic boat reconstruction/repair. Not only will this be costly, but there could well be a long waiting list and the work itself could take months.

2. Buy a boat that has already had major essential work done. If it’s had a conversion, this may or may not be to your taste. Some of the conversions done in the 70s and 80s are looking rather tired. If the boat has been restored by a good yard, it’s likely to be pricey.

I’ve gone down both routes – the cheap and cheerful version where I wasn’t too worried that major work would one day be needed when I could afford it. Eventually both motor and butty had to receive the full restoration treatment.

The bottom line is that whichever way you go, you’ll end up spending around £70-80K. Although some sellers are asking considerably more. On top of that you need to be aware that it’s not cheap maintaining an historic boat, especially if it has a vintage engine.

Anybody interested in seeing what’s involved in owning historic boats could have a glance at my two websites – below.

As has already been suggested, I’d go and visit (it’s no use trying to do this by phone or email) various yards and boat restorers to see what’s in the pipeline. Very often they’ll know what’s likely to come up for sale by word of mouth. You’ll also need to convince people that you are going to be able to look after a boat that has been lovingly nurtured over the years. For example, the owner of Elizabeth specifically says:
The new owner will need to be practical and have the time and resources to dedicate to the maintenance of this remarkable boat, she is not the sort of craft that can just be left in a marina.”

Best of luck with your search. You mention the Braunston Show. Get chatting to boaters; let people know you are interested.

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, koukouvagia said:

1. Buy what is essentially a wreck. This will probably be very cheap. You’ll then have the option of doing it up gradually, getting professional help when required – e.g. new baseplate, footings etc. Or you might decide to hand the boat over to one of the few yards that can deal with historic boat reconstruction/repair. Not only will this be costly, but there could well be a long waiting list and the work itself could take months.

2. Buy a boat that has already had major essential work done. If it’s had a conversion, this may or may not be to your taste. Some of the conversions done in the 70s and 80s are looking rather tired. If the boat has been restored by a good yard, it’s likely to be pricey.

I’ve gone down both routes – the cheap and cheerful version where I wasn’t too worried that major work would one day be needed when I could afford it. Eventually both motor and butty had to receive the full restoration treatment.

The bottom line is that whichever way you go, you’ll end up spending around £70-80K. Although some sellers are asking considerably more. On top of that you need to be aware that it’s not cheap maintaining an historic boat, especially if it has a vintage engine.

Anybody interested in seeing what’s involved in owning historic boats could have a glance at my two websites – below.

As has already been suggested, I’d go and visit (it’s no use trying to do this by phone or email) various yards and boat restorers to see what’s in the pipeline. Very often they’ll know what’s likely to come up for sale by word of mouth. You’ll also need to convince people that you are going to be able to look after a boat that has been lovingly nurtured over the years. For example, the owner of Elizabeth specifically says:
The new owner will need to be practical and have the time and resources to dedicate to the maintenance of this remarkable boat, she is not the sort of craft that can just be left in a marina.”

Best of luck with your search. You mention the Braunston Show. Get chatting to boaters; let people know you are interested.

 

 

 

Cheers Iam well aware of the ins and outs of historic boat ownership as I have one. My line of preference would defiantly be another wrought iron hull. Although loverly I think a wooden boat wouldn't be practical for me (and Iam a cabinetmaker) also I defiantly wouldn't have the funds to responsibly take one on. But Iam not put off by conversions just depnds on what they've done to the cabin as Iam defiantly looking for a clothed boat. 

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