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6 hours ago, Dyertribe said:

Rule No1: Enjoy!!!!

 

Dear Tribey, I feel driven to comment on this and go all philosophical.

In my personal opinion, the exhortation to 'enjoy' is rather futile. Whether one enjoys an experience or not is largely outside the control of enjoyee in my experience. Young spods of waiters are particularly prone to instructing me to 'enjoy' when placing the course I've just ordered in front to of me as though the idea of enjoying it might not have occurred to me had they not suggested it. But rather than grumpily giving them the benefit of my philosophy on the matter I usually smile and say "I'm sure I will" or something equivalently banal in response. I certainly don't want to suppress their rather engaging puppy-dog-like enthusiasm for what they see as doing their job well. But I prefer the professional aloofness of the waiters we used to have in good French restaurants back in the seventies. But getting back to the point, enjoying something is not something one consciously decides to do, or not. Rather, one embarks on the experience then discovers (often afterwards) how much one enjoyed it, or not. 

Similarly with boating. No-one spends £ks on buying a boat or even hiring one with the intention of hating it, or even feeling ambivalent about it. They hope to enjoy it. So suggesting they enjoy it is a leeetle bit like stating the obvious!

I hope you'll cut me some slack for having this little rant. Its 5am and I can't sleep, and your post has given me something to something to do other than drink the remains of this excellent bottle of wine given to me by a customer yesterday. Hmmm.... err.... 

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Dear Boiley,

Rant away!

My exhortation to enjoy was a lazy shorthand just before I made my way to bed.

What I meant was don't get too hung up on the dos and don'ts of canal etiquette to the detriment of having a happy time.

Even if you make a slight faux pas on the Cut as long as you have a polite attitude and a ready smile most boaters will forgive you.

They might post on a canal forum to tell others of the numpty they met today but think of the pleasure you will have given them.

regarding the insomnia. Alcohol acts as a stimulant, have you considered Horlicks?

Edited by Dyertribe
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8 hours ago, MJG said:

 

A brisk walking pace is fine in most situations, to gauge this watch the bank and imagine yourself walking along it.

This is what I always do (though imagining another, unspecified, person, rather than doing an astral projection), I think you're the first person to mention that you use/ used a similar method.

8 minutes ago, Dyertribe said:

Alcohol acts as a stimulant, 

Shurely shome mishtake here?

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You'll get a good welcome here, Americans are generally well liked.  We tend to keep our voices down in public so that others don't have to hear every word.  The British do like to tease Americans and can come across as sarcastic, but that's just our sense of humour.

Some words in British English mean completely different things in American English.  Do look up 'fanny' for instance! :)

Edited by mross
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26 minutes ago, mross said:

You'll get a good welcome here, Americans are generally well liked.  We tend to keep our voices down in public so that others don't have to hear every word.  The British do like to tease Americans and can come across as sarcastic, but that's just our sense of humour.

Some words in British English mean completely different things in American English.  Do look up 'fanny' for instance! :)

...foe instance, if you don't hear every word, I believe that an American would say "Pardon me?", meaning "Could you repeat that, please?" An Englishman would, in similar circumstances, ask "Pardon?", "Pardon me" being an apology after one has burped or worse.

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14 minutes ago, Victor Vectis said:

Feel free to apologise to all and sundry for the current resident of the Whitehouse.

And remember that trump is a synonym for fart!

:D

...but to redress the balance, it's also a winning playing card.

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Rule No1: if you are in the pub and happen to meet anyone who owns a green boat, it is customary to buy them beer :D

On 02/11/2017 at 08:08, Dyertribe said:

 Alcohol acts as a stimulant

Alcohol is a depressant.  Caffeine and nicotine are stimulants.... I still like free beer though.

 

Edited by Superunknown
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  • 2 weeks later...

With 6 people on the boat, all used to unlimited water supply, you must regard each water point as a compulsory stop!  You may even want to suggest that anyone who likes a leisurely shower has it while you are topping up with water - that way they don't run out, and you can leave with a full tank.  Assuming you are not holding up a queue of other boats...

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I think all the substantive points I would make are covered above,  so in addition:

1) you might want to try early morning cruising - 0500 is my favourite - and then stop for breakfast. Just go very slowly past any boats that are still asleep. That means you can stop early and explore local attractions eg the not so secret bunker. 

2) do not wear a white peaked cap with scrambled egg on.  They are for the gin palace crowd. 

3) I think it's nice to attach a flag to the filler. Bring a couple of cable ties. 

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  • 1 month later...

What a joy to wake up to all these helpful, kind, funny and practical answers.  To summarize so far (in no particular order)

1. Slow down, especially when passing moored boats.  Slow down to enjoy the canal.  Slow down (this is my goal for the trip)

2. Read the Nicholson guide (downloaded and read it last night)

3. Don't waste the water in the locks by emptying without a boat in it, unless there is no-one in sight

4. Don't moor in places where others need to go - such as water stops, winding holes

5. Take turns at bridges and tunnels (notify waiting boats if you have a boat immediately following)

6. Be prepared for some humiliation on keeping the boat going straight (I've read the zigzag thread)

7. Do the homework - watch the canal trust videos https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/enjoy-the-waterways/boating/a-guide-to-boating/boaters-handbook (done)

8. Learn how to use and protect the locks - paddles etc.

9. "Drive" on the right

10.  Pay Mike the Boilerman 10 Pounds per lock + 20% VAT and hope that he buys everyone some warm beer when he gets back from the Seychelles

Thanks again - can't wait to get out there in June 2018.  We'll warn you before we get going :captain:

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On 10/10/2017 at 09:28, American boater newbie said:

What a joy to wake up to all these helpful, kind, funny and practical answers.  To summarize so far (in no particular order)

1. Slow down, especially when passing moored boats.  Slow down to enjoy the canal.  Slow down (this is my goal for the trip)

2. Read the Nicholson guide (downloaded and read it last night)

3. Don't waste the water in the locks by emptying without a boat in it, unless there is no-one in sight

4. Don't moor in places where others need to go - such as water stops, winding holes

5. Take turns at bridges and tunnels (notify waiting boats if you have a boat immediately following)

6. Be prepared for some humiliation on keeping the boat going straight (I've read the zigzag thread)

7. Do the homework - watch the canal trust videos https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/enjoy-the-waterways/boating/a-guide-to-boating/boaters-handbook (done)

8. Learn how to use and protect the locks - paddles etc.

9. "Drive" on the right

10.  Pay Mike the Boilerman 10 Pounds per lock + 20% VAT and hope that he buys everyone some warm beer when he gets back from the Seychelles

Thanks again - can't wait to get out there in June 2018.  We'll warn you before we get going :captain:

and yes, we'll be enjoying ourselves too!  

OK, you have been warned.  We'll be a party of 11 in three boats on the Llangollen, leaving from Wrenbury 11-18 June.  Can't wait...

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2 hours ago, Ssscrudddy said:

Just 1 point, it's PASS on the right, otherwise stay in the middle

 

True. In addition, the rule isn’t mandatory. 

Its fine if it happens to be convenient to both boats to pass on the left. This occasionally crops up - especially when entering/leaving  locks. 

Edited by Mike the Boilerman
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16 hours ago, American boater newbie said:

What a joy to wake up to all these helpful, kind, funny and practical answers.  To summarize so far (in no particular order)

1. Slow down, go slowly especially when passing moored boats.  Slow down Go at the best speed to enjoy the canal (which can be faster on long, uniform, straight bits) .  Slow down Go at a relaxed speed (this is my goal for the trip). "Slow down" is incorrect as you may already be going slowly.

2. Read the a reasonably current Nicholson guide (downloaded and read it last night)

3. Don't waste the water in the locks by emptying without a boat in it, unless there is no-one in sight within a reasonable distance. If they are on the horizon, you could wait all day, and then they could decide to moor for lunch just before the lock!

4. Don't moor in places where others need to go - such as water stops, winding holes

5. Take turns as seems best at bridges and tunnels (notify waiting boats if you have a boat immediately following). It often is not 1 for 1.

6. Be prepared for some humiliation disappointment on keeping the boat going straight (I've read the zigzag thread)

7. Do the homework - watch the canal trust videos https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/enjoy-the-waterways/boating/a-guide-to-boating/boaters-handbook (done)

8. Learn how to use and protect the locks - paddles etc.

9. "Drive" on the right "Drive" in the middle (most canals), pass on the right, except where commonsense dictates otherwise.

10.  Pay Mike the Boilerman 10 Pounds per lock + 20% VAT and hope that he buys everyone some warm beer when he gets back from the Seychelles

Thanks again - can't wait to get out there in June 2018.  We'll warn you before we get going :captain:

I'm twiddling my thumbs waiting for dinner to cook (pie in oven). Can you tell?

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4 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

True. In addition, the rule isn’t mandatory. 

Its fine if it happens to be convenient to both boats to pass on the left. This occasionally crops up - especially when entering/leaving  locks. 

Quite often on the Llangollen, where the bywashes are strong and always push you in an unhelpful direction...

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  • 6 months later...

Thank you for your treport. I'm pleased to hear that you had yourselves a time, as I believe they say in the States; but even more pleased that you had the courtesy to let us all know how you got on. It's not unknown for people to appear on CWDF, ask for and receive detailed advice and then disappear for ever.

Two things:

- any mistake you made, you weren't the first: many, including probably the owners of the boats which you bumped, will have made similar errors in the past. Sop don't worry about it.

- try the South Oxford Canal next year if you like a gentle, idyllic and winding rural waterway. Hire from Napton Narrowboats and go South, or Oxfordshire Narrowboats and go North. Other waterways are, of course, available, but I am biased as we moor our boat on the S. Oxford.

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Very pleased you had a good time.  I enjoyed your update and I liked the riposte with regard to the lock\windlass encounter.  Unless he was a real miserable git I suspect his comment was meant in jest just poorly delivered ?

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