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bizzard

Old sayings.

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29 minutes ago, Jon57 said:

The devil finds work for evil hands. Plenty on hear then LOL

Surely "idle hands"?

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Yes your right. Just made up a new old saying by mistake!!!

Must be the nelly pledge in me!

Muse get a little hand on that watch

Must get a little hand on that watch!

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46 minutes ago, Dyertribe said:

He had the skin of his ar*e on his forehead.

AKA a very deep frown!

reminds me of "a face like a well-smacked ar*e" although different in meaning

there was a curmudgeonly old bloke I used to work with who, whenever asked where anything was, would usually reply "on a hook up my ar*e"

Couldn't stop a pig in a ginnel

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20 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

reminds me of "a face like a well-smacked ar*e" although different in meaning

there was a curmudgeonly old bloke I used to work with who, whenever asked where anything was, would usually reply "on a hook up my ar*e"

Couldn't stop a pig in a ginnel

My mother had a somewhat more polite version:

"Up at Peter's hanging on a nail."

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4 hours ago, carlt said:

 

Lewis's flagship store was indeed in Liverpool but they had stores all over the North,  Sheffield's being the one I remember though I think it became "Owen Owen".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis's

My mother used to drag me round Lewis's in Birmingham every school holiday!

 

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15 hours ago, Ray T said:

My mother had a somewhat more polite version:

"Up at Peter's hanging on a nail."

My Dad's version - "in Fanny's room, under the clock."

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My dear mum used to take my brother and myself to the Christmas grotto in Lewis's Liverpool in the late 50's - 60's and I remember walking past displays of moving puppets then in to see Santa . She also used to tell me there used to be a zoo on the roof ? anybody else know of that ? there was a zoo in Liverpool , the front gatehouse is all that remains opposite the old walton hospital site next to the plough hotel , the plaster work has monkeys etc in it .

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One of my grandmother's :- Dem as cor, cor, con 'em.

                                        Dem as con, con, cor 'em.

 

He / She's got a face like a bulldog chewing a wasp......

 

Another one of grandmother's : - "It's a bit black over the back of Bill's mother's!"

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To stop her grandchildren arguing over whoever had the biggest slice of cake, she used to say "you cut (pointing at one of them) and you choose" (pointing at the other.

A tactic I successfully used on when my two children were growing up. 

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On 25/09/2017 at 15:33, Jon57 said:

The devil finds work for evil hands. Plenty on hear then LOL

Fireback it.

(I was surprised to find that no one except me seemed to understand this. It was used in my family to mean "throw it away", i.e. throw it on to the back of the fire and burn it. Is anyone else familiar with it?)

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Attributed to some French woman - "Let them eat cake." Apparently this statement had some unpleasant repercussions. :D

In for 1d in for a £.

1d for your thoughts.

A miss is a good as a mile.

This was from a boat woman on discussing the family links within the canal people and the danger of critising one boater to another.

"Aye kick one of us and we all limp."

Edited by Ray T

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On 9/27/2017 at 13:22, Athy said:

Fireback it.

(I was surprised to find that no one except me seemed to understand this. It was used in my family to mean "throw it away", i.e. throw it on to the back of the fire and burn it. Is anyone else familiar with it?)

Yes

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On 27/09/2017 at 08:57, cuthound said:

To stop her grandchildren arguing over whoever had the biggest slice of cake, she used to say "you cut (pointing at one of them) and you choose" (pointing at the other.

A tactic I successfully used on when my two children were growing up. 

In a similar vein when my sisters an I all wanted pudding first my old man used to say cryptically, "Thems that are first will be last and thems that are last will be first." I remember pointing out that this meant that technically nobody got anything, and nothing is what I got.

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My dad used to say "Have what your given or go without".

 

On the news this morning one I've not heard for a while "It's a right pea souper".

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17 minutes ago, Harpur Hill said:

People's Republic of Yorkshire.

I was brought up in the West Riding before it gained independence, and my parents were from N. Derbyshire, so I don't know whether they learned the expression from their new neighbours in Sheffield or brought it across the border from Chesterfield.

7 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

 

 

On the news this morning one I've not heard for a while "It's a right pea souper".

It's rarely used now and I wonder if the person using it knew what it meant - it used to refer to the thick fog, or "smog" (another word rarely used now) which could be generated in industrial cities, especially London.

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2 minutes ago, Athy said:

I was brought up in the West Riding before it gained independence, and my parents were from N. Derbyshire, so I don't know whether they learned the expression from their new neighbours in Sheffield or brought it across the border from Chesterfield.

It's rarely used now and I wonder if the person using it knew what it meant - it used to refer to the thick fog, or "smog" (another word rarely used now) which could be generated in industrial cities, especially London.

That was the context as they were showing a shot of St Paul's which could only just be made out through the smog. This was whilst reporting on the proposed banning of wood burners in London.

 

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1 minute ago, Rob-M said:

That was the context as they were showing a shot of St Paul's which could only just be made out through the smog. This was whilst reporting on the proposed banning of wood burners in London.

 

...and where, pray, are the long-term moorings adjacent to St. Paul's?

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