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Art Deco on the Canal

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I suppose there are a few Art Deco craft on the waterways, but returning to buildings, The following is at Sherborne Wharf in Birmingham and dates from the 1930's

648807.jpg

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Staple Inn in Holborn was rebuilt due to having been seriously damaged by a WWII flying bomb.  When I was working in the area in the late 1970's there was a large glass-fronted dislay panel just inside the entrance, with before and after photos of the damage and restoration, also a map showing the area affected.  It wasn't there when I visited the area in  the mid-2000's, nor was there anything saying it had been extensively restored. 

 

Something else that had vanished was the large cast iron plaque in Chancery Lane on the railings opposite the London Silver Vaults saying that the pitting in the stonework of the building behind it had been caused by bombs dropped from a Zeppelin in 1916. The pitting is still there! 

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Staple Inn will be familar to any smokers as the building depicted on the 'Old Holborn' tobacco tins.

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Moving slightly off topic, I wonder if anyone has designed the interior of their narrowboat along Art Deco lines?  

Edited by koukouvagia

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5 hours ago, koukouvagia said:

Moving slightly off topic, I wonder if anyone has designed the interior of their narrowboat along Art Deco lines?  

 

There was a narrow Bridgewater Tug or Inspection boat  replica made in the 90's called "Turn of the World" which had a lovely art deco interior.

 

However a Google search doesn't show any results.

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Yes - Tudor:

https://hidden-london.com/nuggets/staple-inn/

 

I once had cause to deliver to chambers within and was disappointed with finding very ordinary offices with straight and upright walls and doors. The best of it is the facade.

 

The Old Curiosity Shop is a bit better, albeit with a dreadful colour scheme.

http://www.londontown.com/LondonInformation/Shopping/The_Old_Curiosity_Shop/6740/imagesPage/24807

 

Paris Metro is the place for Art Deco. Or was.

Edited by Derek R.

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16 minutes ago, Derek R. said:

 

 

Paris Metro is the place for Art Deco. Or was.

Yep. Whoops, oui.

Art deco metro.jpg

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#31 is actually Staple Inn Buildings. Staple Inn itself lies behind it, accessed via an entrance to the left of the "Old Holborn" building, or via a gate at the end of the path to the right of the #31 building. The latter used to be a convenient pedestrian route to the old Patent Office Library before it merged with the British Library at St. Pancras. 

Edited by Ronaldo47
Typo, clarification

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On 11/08/2017 at 14:48, BWM said:

I'm sure that it was demolished, with the facia used to front the newly built flats. A modern get out clause to redevelop listed buildings. 

It's known as "death masking". Travel round London you will see old building facades held up by serious structural scaffold/support systems. Some really tall and about 2 foot deep only.

On 11/08/2017 at 21:26, Derek R. said:

Some others that come to mind: Whiteley's department store in Queensway. Opened in 1911, and demolished save the facade in the eighties; The Hoover Building, now a Tesco's; and Staples Inn in Holborn - at least some of the interior has been retained. From a delivery I made there in the eighties, the interior looked so modern it defied any resemblance to the exterior, which as many will know is depicted on the "Old Holborn" tobacco products.

Whitleys is being redeveloped. IIRC, another death mask jobbie.

Edited by mark99
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6 hours ago, Heartland said:

Staple Inn has the appearance of something a lot older than Art Deco.

 

 

Staple Inn.jpg

That's stunning where is it?

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42 minutes ago, tree monkey said:

That's stunning where is it?

 

Junction of Holborn, Grays Inn Road and Chancery Lane in London.

 

Came out of that tube station exit on many occasions.

Edited by cuthound
Phat phingers
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1 hour ago, mark99 said:

It's known as "death masking". Travel round London you will see old building facades held up by serious structural scaffold/support systems. Some really tall and about 2 foot deep only.

Whitleys is being redeveloped. IIRC, another death mask jobbie.

When I was working in architecture we had a facade retension job where the facade including the tower collapsed into the street one night!! Fortunately no one was hurt. Cracking had been noticed and recorded the day before by one of my colleagues but the structural engineer took no action. Red faces all round. The facade was rebuilt - there is a gargoyle on the tower which is a dead ringer for me!! The building is the Lamberts factory in Nottingham

.Lambert.jpeg.54f5fc46b1b75f613f825ef55865e325.jpeg

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18 minutes ago, Richard T said:

When I was working in architecture we had a facade retension job where the facade including the tower collapsed into the street one night!! Fortunately no one was hurt. Cracking had been noticed and recorded the day before by one of my colleagues but the structural engineer took no action. Red faces all round. The facade was rebuilt - there is a gargoyle on the tower which is a dead ringer for me!! The building is the Lamberts factory in Nottingham

.Lambert.jpeg.54f5fc46b1b75f613f825ef55865e325.jpeg

 

That must have been expensive! All the additional costs of facade retention, compared with complete new build, and then the cost to rebuild the collapsed bits. I guess someone's insurance covered quite a lot of the extra cost.

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19 hours ago, Derek R. said:

Paris Metro is the place for Art Deco. Or was.

I prefer Gliwice in Poland, previously Gleiwitz in Prussia. Besides some stunning Jugendstil buildings, you can also visit the two Gleiwitzer Canals, and find remains of the small Klodnitz Canal which used inclines, rather than locks, and had a coal mine section based on the underground canals at Worsley.

1997 Gliwice 629.jpg

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21 hours ago, cuthound said:

 

There was a narrow Bridgewater Tug or Inspection boat  replica made in the 90's called "Turn of the World" which had a lovely art deco interior.

 

However a Google search doesn't show any results.

 

Found some images of the exterior of "Turnothworld", but unfortunately none of the art deco interior.

 

Apparently built by Roger Fuller in 1998. I remember mooring next to the (probably then) owners who showed me round it.

 

SDC14111.JPG

IMG_7576_thumb4.jpg

Edited by cuthound
To add the last paragraph
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40 minutes ago, Tom Morgan said:

That's Art Nouveau.

Wait till I see that Derek R. It's all his fault.

Yet, seeking a photo, I entered "Art Deco Metro" into my search engine and that picture came up, captioned as a famous Art Deco Paris Metro station. It does look very decorated (which I think is what Deco stands for).

Edited by Athy

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21 hours ago, magpie patrick said:

I'd be intrigued to see an Art Deco lock, or even an Art Nouveau one... 

That might be a funding wheeze for someone

You've not read my book on L&LC Brightwork, as the more colourful aspects may have originated in Pugin's Gothic Revival style which marked the beginning of the changes to architectural and art styles which resulted in Art Nouveau. Pugin built Scarisbrick Hall which is alongside the L&LC, and he encouraged local craftsmen to develop their skills. The decorative work on L&LC boats reached its peak around 1910, and seems to have developed from around 1860, when Pugin was building the Hall.

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On 12/08/2020 at 11:44, cuthound said:

 

Found some images of the exterior of "Turnothworld", but unfortunately none of the art deco interior.

 

Apparently built by Roger Fuller in 1998. I remember mooring next to the (probably then) owners who showed me round it.

 

SDC14111.JPG

IMG_7576_thumb4.jpg

When i was operating Halsall it was always tied up below Tilsone lock on the Shroppie. Never saw inside it though so can't comment on the art deco interior.

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