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Richard Saillet/Mr. canalshop jailed for eight years for violent sexual assault.


Starcoaster
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23 minutes ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Wow, you have a degree in composting bog management???!!!

I'm impressed!!

You may jest, but No. 1 Son has just that!  From the University of Loughborough. Degree in Water and Environmental Waste Engineering, WEWE.  You couldn't make it up.

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12 minutes ago, Starcoaster said:

Do you remember when all of those "Mickey Mouse" degree courses were exposed-like combined Waste Management and Dance...

 

No...

Back in the day degrees like law and English literature were considered Mickey Mouse and designed for the thickies.

Only the classics, such as Greek and Latin, counted as proper degrees.

Innit.

Edited by Mike the Boilerman
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When I was in school, typing was for thickies, ergo I was strongly discouraged from taking it, in favour of an additional GCSE in something useful... You know, like R.S.

Even now that I would fancy my chances at beating anyone in a typing speed test, I don't do it in the proper/most efficient way and realise what a great life skill it is to have learnt how to type properly.

Edited by Starcoaster
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49 minutes ago, Starcoaster said:

When I was in school, typing was for thickies, ergo I was strongly discouraged from taking it, in favour of an additional GCSE in something useful... You know, like R.S.

Even now that I would fancy my chances at beating anyone in a typing speed test, I don't do it in the proper/most efficient way and realise what a great life skill it is to have learnt how to type properly.

What I hate is those on screen keyboards at self service ticket stations like at train stations, they have the letters in alphabetical order!  Who the hell thought that up! 

Edited by Robbo
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Arghh yes indeed! they make you feel extra dumb when you cant find the right flaming letter in alphabetical order. And when I was in Europe and was faced with an Azerty keyboard for the first time... Only about three keys are different but it was enough to totally mess me up. Course I just started to get used to it when I came back here to Qwerty ones..

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2 minutes ago, Robbo said:

What I hate is those on screen keyboards at self service ticket stations, they have the letters in alphabetical order!  Who the hell thought that up! 

In the early days of computing a primary school brought along a BBC computer to see if the secondary school Techie could sort out why it was typing the wrong letter for each key.   They had removed all the letters and replaced them in alphabetic order as "it was easier for the kids".

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2 hours ago, Starcoaster said:

When I was in school, typing was for thickies, ergo I was strongly discouraged from taking it, in favour of an additional GCSE in something useful... You know, like R.S.

Even now that I would fancy my chances at beating anyone in a typing speed test, I don't do it in the proper/most efficient way and realise what a great life skill it is to have learnt how to type properly.

At my grammar school you were either going to university or  become a secretary. I was written off and put on the shorthand/typing course. Pitman was my nemesis - I couldn't master the soft writing versus hard writing but I was a demon on the typewriter  - still a manual one in my day. I've since proved the snobs wrong that assumed the council estate kid is a thickie by qualifying as a chartered accountant but I still love my touch typing skills. It's very intuitive though - if someone asks me where, for example the y is on the keyboard I'd struggle but sat in front of a keyboard I'd find it instantly. My typing tutor told me it bypasses thinking and goes from eyes to fingers.

I'd love a speed test challenge :)

ETA I remember my shorthand teacher shouting at me and telling me this would be a key skill in my life and would earn me good money if I could master it. Methinks she was wrong. Does anyone do shorthand nowadays?

Edited by Ange
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8 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

No...

Back in the day degrees like law and English literature were considered Mickey Mouse and designed for the thickies.

Only the classics, such as Greek and Latin, counted as proper degrees.

Innit.

Any the idiot of the family was sent to study religion. ;)

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9 hours ago, Starcoaster said:

Do you remember when all of those "Mickey Mouse" degree courses were exposed-like combined Waste Management and Dance...

I find my "star wars degree" very useful thank you. The ability to tap into "the force" is an invaluable asset, especially at lift bridges. 

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10 hours ago, rusty69 said:

Don't upset the composting loo brigade whatever else you do. 

They might all hold a meeting in a telephone box or if they get lucky maybe fill a porta cabin and exchange views on their bogs and eco fans ;)

10 hours ago, Chris-B said:

Sometimes you can be a total twat , we have one and are happy with it 

different folks like different thing ....maybe you will enjoy the outer rings of Saturn ...;-)

 

 

" Sometimes!! " only sometimes.........you do me an injustice sir :D

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7 hours ago, Ange said:

At my grammar school you were either going to university or  become a secretary. I was written off and put on the shorthand/typing course. Pitman was my nemesis - I couldn't master the soft writing versus hard writing but I was a demon on the typewriter  - still a manual one in my day. I've since proved the snobs wrong that assumed the council estate kid is a thickie by qualifying as a chartered accountant but I still love my touch typing skills. It's very intuitive though - if someone asks me where, for example the y is on the keyboard I'd struggle but sat in front of a keyboard I'd find it instantly. My typing tutor told me it bypasses thinking and goes from eyes to fingers.

I'd love a speed test challenge :)

ETA I remember my shorthand teacher shouting at me and telling me this would be a key skill in my life and would earn me good money if I could master it. Methinks she was wrong. Does anyone do shorthand nowadays?

I deliberately took a day release secretarial course while doing my A levels at evening class.  People couldn't understand why someone doing A levels needed to be able to type. The A levels got me to university and on to teacher training, the typing made my work as a teacher of ICT and computing much easier - and I still sometimes take notes in meetings in shorthand - but I did Teeline, no soft or hard writing. 

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7 hours ago, Ange said:

At my grammar school you were either going to university or  become a secretary. I was written off and put on the shorthand/typing course. Pitman was my nemesis - I couldn't master the soft writing versus hard writing but I was a demon on the typewriter  - still a manual one in my day. I've since proved the snobs wrong that assumed the council estate kid is a thickie by qualifying as a chartered accountant but I still love my touch typing skills. It's very intuitive though - if someone asks me where, for example the y is on the keyboard I'd struggle but sat in front of a keyboard I'd find it instantly. My typing tutor told me it bypasses thinking and goes from eyes to fingers.

I'd love a speed test challenge :)

ETA I remember my shorthand teacher shouting at me and telling me this would be a key skill in my life and would earn me good money if I could master it. Methinks she was wrong. Does anyone do shorthand nowadays?

My wife sometimes writes notes for herself in shorthand, she says it is quicker, I think she does not want me to be able to read them:lol:

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BBC News report of original story.

Not radically different from local newspaper story, but some additional info.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-39894708

I suppose he most scary thing here is that these 4 assaults only represent an elapsed period of little more than a couple of months last year.  It seems very hard to imagine there were not dozens, if not hundreds, more over a much longer period.

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3 hours ago, Captain Pegg said:

Nice one! (but I didn't get it to start with).

I have to confess I was totally taken in by the man and am therefore left in a state of deep shock. Catharsis will no doubt take the form of regular motions into one of my EcoToilets purchases as suggested by a previous poster.

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3 hours ago, alan_fincher said:

BBC News report of original story.

Not radically different from local newspaper story, but some additional info.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-3989470

He used to be on his burner phones in every spare moment he thought he was alone and was probably trying to arrange meets once or twice a week 18 months ago when Ibwas around. So I am sure he was prolific. There is mention in some reports about him planning an attack in advance by calling one of the victims (wonder how she got singled out) about some kind of survey, but I strongly suspect he found most of them through dating sites. Finding his dodgy profiles on dating sites used to be something of a game for the shop staff.

Edited by Starcoaster
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27 minutes ago, rasputin said:

What is a burner phone? 

You obviously never watched the earlier series of "The Wire" with Idris Elba (Stringer Bell).  It is actually a good series.

The drug dealers would use a pre-paid phone for a week or so, then dump it and get another, that way the police could never monitor their calls, or link them to a specific individual.

Edited by Chewbacka
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