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buggsy
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I watched the series 5 times maybe more, I did not like the fit out, it just became something a bit confusing in the end.

 

 

They Should of restored it as a working boat and kept its character.

 

Old ways are the best.

Edited by brassedoff
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I watched the series 5 times maybe more, I did not like the fit out, it just became something a bit confusing in the end.

 

 

They Should of restored it as a working boat and kept its character.

 

Old ways are the best.

Fine words, and I love unconverted, (or even de-converted) former working narrow boats.

 

However the type of owner who can afford to pay the costs associated with up to 72 feet of (maybe) 80 year old boat, but only benefit from 8 feet of living space is hardly your typical current day leisure boat owner, and it would be impossible to find enough owners for all surviving working boats if it were decreed they all had to be put back to original appearance.

 

What is you view on unconverted non powered butty boats - rapidly getting a far rarer beast than the powered motor "equivalent"?

 

They are still being cut in half to form two motor boats, so would you be prepared to put your money where your mouth is, and take one on to save it from that outcome? Unless that has already occurred, the butty "Lyra", (a relatively rare "Small Northwich"), briefly owned by my late brother faced this threat - it would be great to see it back in use as an unconverted boat, but I'm afraid I fear the worse.

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Fine words, and I love unconverted, (or even de-converted) former working narrow boats.

 

However the type of owner who can afford to pay the costs associated with up to 72 feet of (maybe) 80 year old boat, but only benefit from 8 feet of living space is hardly your typical current day leisure boat owner, and it would be impossible to find enough owners for all surviving working boats if it were decreed they all had to be put back to original appearance.

 

What is you view on unconverted non powered butty boats - rapidly getting a far rarer beast than the powered motor "equivalent"?

 

They are still being cut in half to form two motor boats, so would you be prepared to put your money where your mouth is, and take one on to save it from that outcome? Unless that has already occurred, the butty "Lyra", (a relatively rare "Small Northwich"), briefly owned by my late brother faced this threat - it would be great to see it back in use as an unconverted boat, but I'm afraid I fear the worse.

Alan I am new to boating so could not comment on Butty Boats as I know very little indeed, I like the good old days and traditions thats why I like working boats kept as is or restored as was in the old days.

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Alan I am new to boating so could not comment on Butty Boats as I know very little indeed, I like the good old days and traditions thats why I like working boats kept as is or restored as was in the old days.

 

Many ex working boats have now carried cabin conversions for far more years than they worked as carrying boats, (typically a boat nearly 80 years old now only carried for about 30 years), so conversion is in many cases the most major part of their life and evolution.

 

There is a feeling that far too many have interesting conversion that they have carried since the 1960s or 1970s ripped off, just to create yet another boat with an original look.

 

Personally I would not convert a working boat that had not been, but equally I am very happy to finally manage to have bought one with a conversion on. (Not easy - they are becoming very hard to find on the open market).

 

Here's my converted one tied up outside of my (never) converted one - the best of both worlds, but not a cheap way of owning narrow boats!

 

IMG_1324.JPG

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Here's my converted one tied up outside of my (never) converted one - the best of both worlds, but not a cheap way of owning narrow boats!

 

Not converted, but shortened at some point (1940s, was it?) so hardly original -- whatever that means.

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Not converted, but shortened at some point (1940s, was it?) so hardly original -- whatever that means.

 

smiley_offtopic.gif (Sorry for thread derail, but it is a very old one! :lol)

 

But as a result "Sickle" worked for its living from 1936 until 2000, (about 64 years maximum).

 

"Flamingo" was one of the very last working narrow boats working on regular long distance carrying, but, (unless you count her subsequent career carrying people as a trip boat), worked only 1936 until 1970 , (about 34 years maximum).

 

So "Sickle" was actually a "working boat" nearly twice as long as many that now are described as "ex working boat". It depends how you choose to view it, I guess! I actually think it is about as "historic" as you get, having been converted for use as an icebreaker as a very important part of trying to keep canals open throughout the Second World War.

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I like your boats alan, I dont like the working boats converted to high spec.

 

It would be like putting a dress on an old coal miner, a bit insulting to his past.

 

thats just my opinion dont mean to offend anyone, its just what I think.

 

cant type much as I am on a mobile....

Edited by brassedoff
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Well without having access to Pete Harrison's detailed knowledg,. this is clearly nonsense.

 

The owners would seem to include....

 

1) GUCCCo

2) DIWE / BW

3) Tim Leech (see earlier in thread)

4) (Presumably) Keith Ball / Industry Narrowboats

5) Whoever bought it to make the TV series

6) Another owner it was eventually sold on to

7) Owner who has apparently recently bought it via ABNB.

 

That may not be spot on, but clearly "two owners from new" whilst sounding impressive is a load of b****cks!

 

I sold it to Ian Crompton and a.n. other, it may well have been bought from them by the TV people.

 

Tim

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Many ex working boats have now carried cabin conversions for far more years than they worked as carrying boats, (typically a boat nearly 80 years old now only carried for about 30 years), so conversion is in many cases the most major part of their life and evolution.

There is a feeling that far too many have interesting conversion that they have carried since the 1960s or 1970s ripped off, just to create yet another boat with an original look.

Personally I would not convert a working boat that had not been, but equally I am very happy to finally manage to have bought one with a conversion on. (Not easy - they are becoming very hard to find on the open market).

 

Here's my converted one tied up outside of my (never) converted one - the best of both worlds, but not a cheap way of owning narrow boats!

 

IMG_1324.JPG

 

Passed Flaminago on her mooring earlier this week Alan, looked very smart!!

 

Also passed NB Dover at Braunston week before last, must admit that I like her, combination of old and new!

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It often surprises me when people make seemingly educated statements by using inappropriate terms. By Town Class, Charles, are you referring to the bluff, imposing lines of the Harland & Wolff big Woolwich, or perhaps the josher-like double curvature of the Yarwood's big Northwich? Maybe (though unlikely) you meant the Walker bros of Rickmansworth 6 planker who's bows, in their day, were likened to a greyhound (not sure which bit though).

 

You said in your 'what would you do with £170k' thread how you would treat a workboat (chop to 60' and put a cabin on, iirc) I thought the days of butchering historic boats and ruining their lines by making them look like clonecraft specials were behind us?

 

I own a Nurser and an Uxbridge motor nice little curvy 5 plankers but there is no finer sight than, on hearing a vintage engine approaching, going out and seeing the bows of a big Woolwich squeezing under bridge 97.

What are your boats called Carl, and where can we see them, they sound great.

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What are your boats called Carl, and where can we see them, they sound great.

 

 

I don't think Carl is on the forum a great deal at the moment, but you have quoted a post well over 8 years old.

 

Unfortunately one of the boats, (the Uxbridge motor) has not survived, and the Nurser butty "Lucy" has been retrieved and is undergoing a full "rebuild", (I'm not sure of the technically correct term), that should eventually result in a boat that is largely all new wood around the original ironwork.

 

I was going to link to www.phobox.com/lucy, which used to show history of the boat, and rstoration details, but that page seems to have gone AWOL.and I can't find a replacement.

Edited by alan_fincher
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What are your boats called Carl, and where can we see them, they sound great.

He doesn't own them anymore, that post was from 2007.

 

However Carl's boats were Usk and Lucy. Usk was burnt out by arson and ultimately dragged out and broken up. Lucy is being slowly restored at Braunston turn.

 

Edited to add: Wot Alan said. Must read the final page of a thread before replying! :)

Edited by IanM
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