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Stephen Sugg

Where is it?

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Name the place and win a prize!!!

 

Please note, there is no actual prize, just a virtual one.....

 

whereisit.jpg

Edited by Stephen Sugg

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Its the Drundgewick Aquaduct (by the heavy plant crossing) on the Wey & Arun.

Edited by Christine

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Its the Drundgewick Aquaduct (by the heavy plant crossing) on the Wey & Arun.

 

CORRECT!

 

I was thinking of banning you Christine!

 

We had a lovely walk along there yesterday, we were going to go on the Zach Kepp but the pub took so long with the food we missed it and walked!

 

What's the story with the first lock (brewhurst?)? I think it the most perculiar arrangement of bottom gates I've ever seen!

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next picture!! :cheers:

 

I'm game, didn't know where that one was. But I might know the next...let the game comence! :unsure:

 

good way of getting to know the canal system - and looking through old photies....

 

a virtual treasure hunt (haven't we been here before sometime) :cheers:

 

Mrs Panda

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What about this one?

I'll keep quiet for now on this one, to give someone else a chance to answer, but I will say that it is a river, with a lock cut going off at right angles to the right of the photo (just out of shot).

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CORRECT!

 

I was thinking of banning you Christine!

 

We had a lovely walk along there yesterday, we were going to go on the Zach Kepp but the pub took so long with the food we missed it and walked!

 

What's the story with the first lock (brewhurst?)? I think it the most perculiar arrangement of bottom gates I've ever seen!

Interesting isn't it!

 

Brewhurst Lock was the deepest lock on the Wey & Arun but there were problems trying to get the restored canal under the road at Loxwood. The ideal would have been to build a humped back bridge over the canal but the road has had loads of communications systems and services laid at road level and a raised bridge over the canal would have been prohibitively expensive.

 

The result, to in order to allow headroom for a new bridge without disturbing the road level, has been to lower the pound on the approach to Onslow Arms and take the road under the road. The lock down from the road was therefore too high. New lower gates have been fitted and volunteers have had to rebuild Brewhurst Lock at a lower level. The team lengthened the lock so that it can now accommodate both of the Trust's trip boats at the same time. The bottom gates have remained but slots cut in the gates to allow any flow over them. It is an interesting solution.

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Interesting isn't it!

 

Brewhurst Lock was the deepest lock on the Wey & Arun but there were problems trying to get the restored canal under the road at Loxwood. The ideal would have been to build a humped back bridge over the canal but the road has had loads of communications systems and services laid at road level and a raised bridge over the canal would have been prohibitively expensive.

 

The result, to in order to allow headroom for a new bridge without disturbing the road level, has been to lower the pound on the approach to Onslow Arms and take the road under the road. The lock down from the road was therefore too high. New lower gates have been fitted and volunteers have had to rebuild Brewhurst Lock at a lower level. The team lengthened the lock so that it can now accommodate both of the Trust's trip boats at the same time. The bottom gates have remained but slots cut in the gates to allow any flow over them. It is an interesting solution.

 

It's interesting that's for sure! I thought that was the reason behind it. It looks really good along there now, I'd recommend it for a visit if anyone's in the area....

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haha.. i was quite proud of myself :-)

Hmmm. When you click on reply to Adam's post showing the picture, you can see the URL of the image, which includes the image name "Calder_Hebble_Nav_WH_1005.jpg", so there may have been a bit of a clue there!

Ok you lot :unsure:

 

Why is this bridge of note..........

 

sleaBH4.jpg

Because it is the point where the River Slea becomes the Kyme Eau? (Ferry Farm?)

 

P.S. I worked that out by guessing that it was somewhere near the Witham where you moor, Malc, and the Kyme Eau is the only narrow wiggly waterway I could think of in that area!

Edited by MartinClark

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Hmmm. When you click on reply to Adam's post showing the picture, you can see the URL of the image, which includes the image name "Calder_Hebble_Nav_WH_1005.jpg", so there may have been a bit of a clue there!

haha shhhh don't tell anyone :unsure:

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Because it is the point where the River Slea becomes the Kyme Eau? (Ferry Farm?)

 

P.S. I worked that out by guessing that it was somewhere near the Witham where you moor, Malc, and the Kyme Eau is the only narrow wiggly waterway I could think of in that area!

 

Well that's the general idea, isn't it :unsure: I could easily have renamed it before posting, something like lancs10.jp

 

But the picture is significant because it is taken upstream and if you've just read of my recent trip, to get Wud underneath Halfpenny Toll Bridge will be a unique, if not an extremely rare occurance because of the low headroom.

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Hmmm. When you click on reply to Adam's post showing the picture, you can see the URL of the image, which includes the image name "Calder_Hebble_Nav_WH_1005.jpg", so there may have been a bit of a clue there!

 

Sam new it was on the Calder anyway! c'mon people geuss

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Because it is the point where the River Slea becomes the Kyme Eau? (Ferry Farm?)

 

Beyond that bridge for a few hundred yards is actually the Carr Dyke..........:unsure:

 

 

The Romans first attempt at draining the Lincolnshire fens, there is debate as to whether this was ever used as a navigation. The majority of the Carr Dyke is now obliterated and this is one of few stretches in water and certainly the only length that is accessible to narrowboats from the national system.

Edited by Hairy-Neil

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