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Nightwatch

Father Christmas. Can I have... (woodwork router)

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I need new tool and fancy a bit of advice from those in the know.

 

I am venturing into the realms of 'ROUTERS'.

 

Won't be heavily used but I would like depth,edge guide, speed adjustment and any other handy assists.

 

It seems there's 1/4" and 1/2" bits. Which are the better. Is having capability of both advisable?

 

Mains or battery. Not bothered. But battery allows more convenience I guess.

 

I have heard that Erbauer tools from screwfix are good. Is this a fallacy? The rest of my tool empire are Bosch blueys. So you can see I'm not that a serious carpenter, yet! There's still time.

 

Oh! I don't want to spend a fourture on something that will get an outing for routing infrequently.

 

Any comments, cutting or of any otherwise shape or form gratefully received.

 

I need this information so I can zoom off a letter to Lapland.

 

Martyn

Edited by Nightwatch

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I need new tool and fancy a bit of advice from those in the know.

 

I am venturing into the realms of 'ROUTERS'.

 

Won't be heavily used but I would like depth,edge guide, speed adjustment and any other handy assists.

 

It seems there's 1/4" and 1/2" bits. Which are the better. Is having capability of both advisable?

 

Mains or battery. Not bothered. But battery allows more convenience I guess.

 

I have heard that Erbauer tools from screwfix are good. Is this a fallacy? The rest of my tool empire are Bosch blueys. So you can see I'm not that a serious carpenter, yet! There's still time.

 

Oh! I don't want to spend a fourture on something that will get an outing for routing infrequently.

 

Any comments, cutting or of any otherwise shape or form gratefully received.

 

I need this information so I can zoom off a letter to Lapland.

 

Martyn

 

I have a new screwdriver/drill from Screwfix - not that particular brand/make but another of their own.

 

It's brilliant. As ever with cheap(er) products they get mixed reviews some who swear by them and some who swear at them. However mine came with a 2 yr repair or replace guarantee. If it last that long given the price I will be happy.

 

Some say buy cheap by twice but for DIY use rather than professional use this 'made in China; type stuff is generally OK. (and of course even the so called 'big names' farm production out to the far east any way these days). This is why you see comments on forums about the longevity of some of the big brands I would say.

 

Pasts and spares can often be an issue - but if its in a repair or replace guarantee period they would have to replace it with the same or equivalent product anyway.

 

ed - just had a quick check on Screwfix's site and it looks like the Erbauer brand come with a two year guarantee too.

Edited by MJG

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For routers I would look at Axminster Tools as well as Screwfix. They specialise specifically in tools, and I have found them to be a better source of router accessories and cutters. They do some good, well priced, router cutter kits of about 20 commonly used cutters to start you off.

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Rather than edit my op I would just like to say that I think my tool kit comprises of greenies not blueys. It the cheaper of the two however.

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I have had a Bosch router (green one) for twenty five years or so. Used it for occasional DIY stuff as you intend. And have been very happy with it. It came with some bracketry and guides that I have actually never used.

 

I am unsure what you mean by 1/4 and 1/2 inch tools. Do you mean the diameter of the tool shank? My router takes 1/4 inch shanked tools of which there are loads available from various sources. I tend to buy single tools as I need them rather than sets. Individually more expensive but cheaper than buying a boxfull some of which you may never use.

 

For your intended use, and if you were to go with Bosch, I would go with green given the cost of the blue range.

 

 

 

I find a useful guide when deciding what to buy is to have a look on Amazon and read the reviews

 

 

 

Edited to add - Just been to check and mine is actually from the blue range (POF50) so all I said above about the difference between the two Bosch ranges might be waffle

 

 

I may not have helped

Edited by Barry

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You have. I like waffle.

 

I do like the idea of single purchase bits. There's a box full on eBay with 80+ bits. A lot of money too. 1/4" is the 'chuck' size.

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I've owned an Elu router for many years, the quarter inch version. It has coped more than adequately with grooves, chamfers, edge mouldings etc. The half inch versions are perhaps aimed at the professional woodworker and are larger and more expensive. For much of its life it has been sat in my home made router table ( plywood top, steel insert, home made fence etc all mounted on a workmate, in the main I find it easier to take the workpiece across a static router than to take the router across a static workpiece, especially when cutting chamfers for trad style doors. Again, Axminster have always served me well, but then so have Screwfix. Erbauer I regard as mid range kit, should be fine for occasional use. Elu, by the way, are no longer available.

 

Good luck

 

Dave

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I have a basic 1/4" router bought from Screwfix years ago, along with a box of 12 cutters. I later bought an unbranded 1/2" router that was on special offer in B&Q complete with a router table and about 20 1/2" cutters (and a separate collet to take 1/4" cutters).

 

Both are fine for the occasional work I do, although I suspect I would appreciate a better quality machine if I was using it more often.

 

The old one tends to get used for handheld jobs with the newer one mostly living in the table, unless I need to do something with a 1/2" cutter on a bigger workpiece.

 

I have bought a few cutters for particular profiles over the years from Screwfix, Trend and Axminster Tools.

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I bought the cheapest possible router a few years ago, Black and Decker I think, works perfectly well, I think if you pay more you probably get better guides, fences, depth adjustment thingys etc. Any router is a pretty simple thing, electric motor with a chuck on one end in a plastic case with handles.

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I went for a DeWalt 625 with a 1/2" chuck that was on special offer from a firm that immediately went bust.

I like the solidity of the 1/2" stuff.

I would recommend buying a small set of cutters to start, and then buy individuals after that as specific needs arise.

Definitely buy a book or do a course to get the most out of the tool and to learn how to use it safely. They can kick.

I think the secret to successful routing is becoming good at making the jigs to help you use it and to learn how to clamp stuff effectively.

A router is probably the most effective tool for turning wood into sawdust and dispersing it over a wide area.

Probably a good idea to check how effectively you can connect your chosen model to the dust collection/vacuum gear that you have available to you.

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If you are using it to trim worktops so you can join them together (for example) then you need a good straight edge with the final trim done in a single pass. For that you need a long rigid cutter - it needs to be 1/2inch. If you are putting a shape on a bit of wood 20mm thick then a 1/4inch is fine.

 

The 1/4" machine is also smaller and lighter which may help when using free hand.

 

I have a 1/4" for diy use, and when I fitted our kitchen I borrowed a 1/2" for the worktops.

I rarely need a 1/2" machine and will borrow or hire if I need one again.

 

 

Added - They are loud and make a lot of dust.

Edited by Chewbacka

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I went for a DeWalt 625 with a 1/2" chuck that was on special offer from a firm that immediately went bust.

I like the solidity of the 1/2" stuff.

I would recommend buying a small set of cutters to start, and then buy individuals after that as specific needs arise.

Definitely buy a book or do a course to get the most out of the tool and to learn how to use it safely. They can kick.

I think the secret to successful routing is becoming good at making the jigs to help you use it and to learn how to clamp stuff effectively.

A router is probably the most effective tool for turning wood into sawdust and dispersing it over a wide area.

Probably a good idea to check how effectively you can connect your chosen model to the dust collection/vacuum gear that you have available to you.

Very sensible information.

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I went for a DeWalt 625 with a 1/2" chuck that was on special offer from a firm that immediately went bust.

I like the solidity of the 1/2" stuff.

I would recommend buying a small set of cutters to start, and then buy individuals after that as specific needs arise.

Definitely buy a book or do a course to get the most out of the tool and to learn how to use it safely. They can kick.

I think the secret to successful routing is becoming good at making the jigs to help you use it and to learn how to clamp stuff effectively.

A router is probably the most effective tool for turning wood into sawdust and dispersing it over a wide area.

Probably a good idea to check how effectively you can connect your chosen model to the dust collection/vacuum gear that you have available to you.

I thought so too.

I'll watch you tube clips. Get a book perhaps. Before we moved onboard we had quite a nice mahogany dining table with leaves, we gave it to one of our sons, after a year or so he and daughter in law said it didn't fit it with their decor. I couldn't think of a use for it and it went to the skip. Now, of course, I can think of all sorts I could do with the timber. I'm being 'pressured' into applying my skills into building a wardrobe and shelving unit to store too many clothes in. When I get a round tuit, I'm on my way.

 

Martyn

Edited by Nightwatch

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I'm trying to justify buying a router at the moment, I'm considering one of the Triton models along with their router table. The smaller Triton models are 1\4" but they appear to do a 1\2" collet that fits them if required. Axminster sell the Triton, another site I have looked at is http://www.yandles.co.uk.

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Well, I think,I may go for. The Bosch router. It will match the rest of the semi retired power tools.

 

Just need the best place to buy from. Eyes, keep 'em peeled! (Shaw Taylor Vintage)

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I have had a Bosch router (green one) for twenty five years or so. Used it for occasional DIY stuff as you intend. And have been very happy with it.....

 

....I am unsure what you mean by 1/4 and 1/2 inch tools. Do you mean the diameter of the tool shank? My router takes 1/4 inch shanked tools of which there are loads available from various sources.

 

Dad has a tiny hobbie router, 1/4 (6mm at a push,....) which is from a quick google image search a POF500, which is very much green in the newish 10-15year old 'green is domestic' 'blue is pro' scheme.

 

Fundamentally if compared to a £350 professional item its hopeless, as it lack stiffness in the boddy, any precision or repeatability on the depth plunger at all, etc etc. However the same time its the only one we have got, and its turned out no end of odd jobs you wouldnt do without one, mainly making odd bits of trim to match existing trim on the boat during a repair or alternation such as fitting a new rooflight. It works, and at an hours use a year is never going to wear out.

 

Like this https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-POF-500A-ROUTER-Version/dp/B0001D1QEU

 

I really do think it depends if you are getting one to spend hours enjoying a really nice piece of kit or are going to be doing a serious about of machining timber, or if you want something cost effective and semi-reasonable that will knock out bits of mildly moulded wood to an accuracy that would make a cabinate maker cry, but go unnoticed on the boat from 4ft away.

 

 

Daniel

*NB I have edited the title to add 'woodwork router' I hope you dont mind.

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A friend of mine advised me to get a small lightweight one and I wouldn't look back. I ignored him and bought a big chunky 1/2 " one. Three months later I bought a light cheap one from Aldi which takes both 1/2" and 1/4". It's created all kinds of stuff for the boat and has mostly been used freehand.

 

Something you have to think about is a router table and guides. You need both to get the best out of a half inch router. I rarely use mine but it is the one to choose it you want to do long straight lines.

 

Have fun learning how to scorch wood!

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Lots of sensible advice I think on this thread. A few years ago when refitting my own kitchen I decided to invest In a router and bought a 1/2 inch Trend brilliant bit of kit but not cheap. My joiner son borrows it.... nuff said

 

To be fair it is a bit OTT for the use I give it, but the biscuit jointer bit is very useful.

 

I would say a 1/4 inch job might not be too good for boat work if you're intending to work a lot of big plywood pieces or hardwoods

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we had quite a nice mahogany dining table with leaves,

 

 

I couldn't think of a use for it and it went to the skip.

 

 

I should think it was a thin mahogany veneer on a cheaper wood backing, which would be exposed as soon as you routed it, so no great loss.

 

 

I'm glad the title was changed to Woodwork Router, or Santa might have delivered this:

Place-WiFi-Router.gif

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stewpid langwidge. frusty.gif

 

one is a rooter, the other is a rowter.

 

why do we continue to use a written langwidge that is not fonetic?

 

Turkey adopted western alphabet and script when the Ottoman empire collapsed, which gave them the chance to start again, and now every Turkish word is spelt phonetically.

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Who changed the title? Why wasn't I informed? Did I have copyright?

 

I'm not serious, but it's strange that the fairies have visited overnight.

 

Martyn

PS. The table was solid mahogany with proper French polish finish. Bought it second hand years and years ago. Please don't assume that I used to buy old tat. Even though I am now a water gypsie.

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Martyn,

 

I have a route which my dad bought from Machine Mart a month before he died. It's still unused in the box. He bought it to make the tool drawers for his 1937 Armstrong Siddeley, Siddeley Special. I've taken over restoring the car. If you were prepared to make the drawers, I will give you this router, if you want it. It's a Clarke one, not sure what model though but can check later (It's in Solihull) If you want it. There might be some cutting bits to go with it, but unlike the router, as I don't keep tripping over them, I'm not 100% sure.

 

Message me if interested.

 

Rob

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I bought a cheapo one off screwfix some years ago, make unknown. It has few 1/4 cutters with it. It has been excellent for DIY use and has done everything I have asked of it. I have used a professional 1/2 inch (Makitea IIRC) in my work and as one might expect, it was a lot dearer and a lot more robust and powerful. However the old 1/4 inch one has been good enough for odd jobs on the boat etc. Cut a worktop with it only last week. Depends what you want of it really. If i were a kitchen fitter or similar I would buy a bigger better jobbie.

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