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Toby knight

A strang question, what breed of dog is suitable to live on a narrowboat

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Hello,

 

I have a strange question, what type of dog breed, do members think are more suitable for living on a narrowboat ??

 

The other day I saw two very large Alsatian's is living on a 40 foot boat with a lovely couple, it did make me wonder where everybody sleeps ??

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Almost any breed will do. A couple in "our" marina have a pair of Newfoundlands. Some dogs are better at swimming than others. Others will be along to say which breeds.

 

 

 

Not our dog BTW, we have a JRT

 

 

 

Ignore the saggy fenders, they have been replaced.

 

  • Greenie 1

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Any breed will do. Get what breed/size you feel comfortable with.

 

We have a GSD who, in summer, sleeps in the "cave" formed when our cross-bed is pulled out. In winter he sleeps near the stove in the saloon.

 

Our previous dog (the one in my avatar was a GSD/Collie cross. He slept near the stove, winter or summer.

 

Most narrowboats have at least one "passing space" where the corridor widens out (usually at the galleyear and/saloon) where people a d dogs can pass easily.

 

Edited for grammar and clarity, coz we use the cross-bed all year round:)

Edited by cuthound

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My dog is a Staffie, she doesn't swim very well so she has a doggie life jacket and a harness just incase, She is getting a bit old now so we lift her on and off the boat. She hates the floating pontoons in Salthouse Docks Liverpool. Apart from that my friends have brought an assortment of dog breeds onto my boat and they all seem to like it.

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Most dogs that you can love will settle with you in your home, I would NOT like a "pocket dog" wherever, I'd be wary of the illegal breed (fighting dogs) but one of the rest -and that's lots of choice- could well live aboard. Some swim naturally some never will -just like people. Some dogs will be overworked at a mile of walk daily others will feel hard done to if they only get a ten mile run -what can you keep up with.

 

I know a Bernese Mountain dog -It would take a big share of any boat,

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Bear in mind that some breeds and types of dog can't swim-this doesn't necessarily mean that they will not be able to live on a boat, but they will need close supervision and potentially, a life jacket when underway.

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Bear in mind that some breeds and types of dog can't swim-this doesn't necessarily mean that they will not be able to live on a boat, but they will need close supervision and potentially, a life jacket when underway.

I agree entirely with that .... much less worry if you have a good swimmer. I have a lab (not that I live aboard) and I can manage to pull her out of the water by her collar if she goes in where the bank is difficult (eg armco shuttering) Having said that she very very rarely falls in by mistake even though she has only got one eye, she normally jumps in after a stick.

 

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GSDs are good, but I don't think you would want any bigger than this.

 

Fricka used to ride on the stern, get off at the lock, walk around and get back on just as the boat left the lock.

 

Jade was a little less boatie; but still provided the security when we went certain places...

 

Both were bought up on 70' narrowboats.

 

Two on a 40' boat would be too much for me.

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I had Finish Laphund who was just the right size she could get on and off the boat without assistance and she would sit neath tiller near me.

Also took small terrier that didn't like boat.

If dogs enjoys boating guess unless to big no problems

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I agree pretty much any dog can adapt to living on a boat, a few years ago we met a couple with two Great Danes on board. But given the choice I wouldn't opt for one of the breeds that can't swim, it's pretty much inevitable that at some point your pooch will fall in the cut and it's a pain if they have to wear a life jacket constantly.

 

We have lurchers and seem to find more and more boat owners with greyhounds/lurchers/whippets probably because they are typically lazy and don't mind not having loads of exercise. A small dog might seem a sound choice but think about wet and muddy towpaths. We met an elderly couple last week with two tiny terriers and they said it was impossible to keep them clean in the winter. Our next door neighbours on the marina have two lovely cocker spaniels but they have the same problem.

 

Dogs that cast a lot of hair aren't ideal within the confines of a narrowboat.

 

A dog that ticks a lot of boxes would be a poodle - natural swimmers, loyal, good watchdogs and they don't generally shed.

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When we got our rescue GSD, I assume he had never seen a boat before.

 

Within minutes he was on the back deck, so I opened both ends of the boat for him. He then proceeded to run onto the back deck, through the boat, out of the front doors, back to the stern and repeat!

 

He fell in love with the boat immediately. Recently I took it to Glascote Basin, (about 20 minutes away), so single handed it and left him behind because he isn't very good with other dogs, and I thought the people at Norton Canes may not appreciate him, especially if they had a dog on site.

 

According to my wife he just sat and stared out of the patio window, waiting for the boat (not me mind) to return. As soon as I moored, he leapt onto the boat but completly ignored me for going without him.

 

Edited to remove autokorrect induced gobbledygook.

Edited by cuthound
  • Greenie 1

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Most dogs will be fine, given that they like being on a boat! We have two very large labradoodle dogs on ours, and have had up to five dogs aboard. Our previous Jack Russel cross was an excellent boat dog, just th right size without getting under your feet. Many people have Greyhounds which seem to adapt well to the boat life; I would certainly consider one.

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We have an Airedale and he's the third one who has been boating with us and they are all great boat dogs as they seem to be able to adapt to anywhere and are alert watch dogs. When we were carrying and camping boating we had an old black mongrel called scruff. Now he was a boat dog he could run down the top planks from cabin to fore end, jump off at bridge holes and swim after the boat. In a Thames lock he once decided to get off but the coping was at least 6 ft above the cabin top and he slide down the wall into the water. The keeper fished him out with a keb and put him on the roof saying your dog reminds me of a lavatory brush on legs. I said sorry he couldn't read the keep of the grass signs.

Going down the Stratford with a load of coal to the big festival I bashed him on the head putting the tiller bar down into the cabin as he was jumping up, thought he was dead but after another couple of locks he came round good job as he was really the kids dog.

David

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Who's that handsome young man at the tiller ?

 

And who's the girl reading a story out of her book to Scruff ?

 

Do you remember them ?

 

Cheers, Peter.

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There is only 'one' - its a Pug !

 

Pro's

Smallish size

Don't need to store huge bags of dog food

Loving

Good guard dog

Don't need a huge amount of walking / exercising

 

Cons

Snore

Cannot swim

Very protective of their 'bone' (even when asleep)

 

IMG_20160707_150441_zpswsyymbt8.jpg

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Who's that handsome young man at the tiller ?

 

And who's the girl reading a story out of her book to Scruff ?

 

Do you remember them ?

 

Cheers, Peter.

Steerer our partner in the Crane called David Chapman and the young lady the first mate Penny actually doing a crossword puzzle.

Regards David

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Sounds like our chihuahua but more bulky ;)

There is only 'one' - its a Pug !

 

Pro's

Smallish size

Don't need to store huge bags of dog food

Loving

Good guard dog

Don't need a huge amount of walking / exercising

 

Cons

Snore

Cannot swim

Very protective of their 'bone' (even when asleep)

 

IMG_20160707_150441_zpswsyymbt8.jpg

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I'd go for a Dachshund. If it turns out to be a rubbish boat dog, it'll still make a great draft excluder. ;)

 

(I wouldn't really - my Ship's Dog is a Labrador)

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we have an American boxer ( Bulloxer ) . gets on great on the boat indeed is happier aboard than he was in the old house . BUT doesnt swim so lifejacket is a must and we keep him inside on the locks as their other trait is madness including trying to board other boats mid lock to say hi to the other boaters and their hounds .

 

see lots of Spaniels aboard who are just as Nuts but at least they swim .

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We've always found Collies good on boats. The in-laws Collie used to enjoy boating, especially sitting by the stove, although he did misjudge a jump once and took an unexpected swim!

We've just taken on a Border Collie X Springer Spaniel, who loves living on the boat, doesn't take up too much room, but does leave a bit of hair for the Hoover. She's not keen on locks, unless she's getting off to run to the next one!

Edited by NB Watersnail

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