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ditchy

Pulley

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I'm after a BMC 1.8 cranlshafy pulley as I've taken mine off and it has a chip out of the keyway. It is approx 28 inner & 185mm outer diameter. Thanks in advanve.

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Hi ditchy

 

Have you tried Calcutt Boats, they have loads of BMC bits :)

 

Address:
Tomlow Rd, Stockton, Southam CV47 8HX
Phone: 01926 813757

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Worth calling Chertsey Meads Marine (Google for phone number) they have recently helped a friend of mine out with parts for a BMC 2.5 :)

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I'm after a BMC 1.8 cranlshafy pulley as I've taken mine off and it has a chip out of the keyway. It is approx 28 inner & 185mm outer diameter. Thanks in advanve.

Plenty on Ebay.

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This is a pulley from a BMC 1.5/1.8. The key feature is that it is in two parts, separated by a thick rubber section. This allows the outer ring to damp out oscillations in the crankshaft by being connected through a flexible element. Opinions differ on if this is necessary, I'm inclined towards thinking that it is

 

Pulley-1.JPG

 

This is the problem with these pulleys:

 

crack-1.JPG

 

They develop a crack along the keyway. Ditchy's is worse than this with a piece falling out. As this is the surface that the oil seal runs on, it makes a terrible mess

 

Now, if pulleys were easy to find, I would scrap this one. But they are nigh on unobtainable. I have just stripped the pulleys from three engines, and only one is OK

 

So, we need a pragmatic solution, which is a Speed Sleeve:

 

sleeve-1.JPG

 

It's a precision made, thin walled sleeve intended to renew sealing surfaces. In this case, it will seal the crack and stop oil seeping out. It will also put a strengthening hoop around the spigot which will help hold it together.

 

The sleeves come as a kit with a fitting tool:

 

sleeve-2.JPG

 

Which you put over the sleeve and fit it with a hammer:

 

sleeve-3.JPG

 

This is the fitted sleeve:

 

sleeve-4.JPG

 

And it's too long, and hardened, so it needs to be ground off:

 

cut-off-1.JPG

 

And there we are:

 

Pulley-2.JPG

 

Richard

  • Greenie 3

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This is a pulley from a BMC 1.5/1.8. The key feature is... etc, etc.

 

Richard

If that isn't the most helpful post I've ever seen, I don't remember what the better ones were! I don't have a BMC engine, but I might go and buy one just to ask questions about it now! Nice one, Richard, have a greenie. :)

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Plenty on Ebay.

 

There are a few MGB B series pulleys there, but are these the same as the BMC diesel?

 

I was also told the 1.5 is different from the 1.8?

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There are a few MGB B series pulleys there, but are these the same as the BMC diesel?

 

I was also told the 1.5 is different from the 1.8?

 

I have had 1.5 and 1.8 pulleys side by side and I cannot see any difference

 

Richard

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I have had 1.5 and 1.8 pulleys side by side and I cannot see any difference

 

Richard

 

Thanks for that bit of info.

 

I'm sure at the time I had phoned Calcutt some years ago or similar establishment and they advised against mixing the two. I might have misunderstood the details I was told.

 

I found your repair of the pulley interesting to follow. How much was the Speed Sleeve?

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The Americans on the MGexp forum swear by them as a way of helping keep oil in B series engines.

 

There's a lot of discussion on MG forums about the harmonic damper/ pulley. General view of the expert engine builders is that without them engine life can be affected - racers having problems with broken cranks. They're available second hand from MG breakers.

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The Americans on the MGexp forum swear by them as a way of helping keep oil in B series engines.

 

There's a lot of discussion on MG forums about the harmonic damper/ pulley. General view of the expert engine builders is that without them engine life can be affected - racers having problems with broken cranks. They're available second hand from MG breakers.

 

And are they the same as the diesel pulley? Calcutt say they are unobtainable, so I would be surprised if the MGB one, which is very common, was the same

 

Richard

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So, we need a pragmatic solution, which is a Speed Sleeve:

 

 

 

Which you put over the sleeve and fit it with a hammer:

 

 

Without intending to appear anal, the SKF variety you have is Speedi Sleeve. I spent a while googling speed sleeve and got few hits. Just in case the photos disappear from this site, for reference, your part no. is SKF 99156.

 

The idea of hammering this on, even with the tool, frightens me a little! I have a flypress and much prefer to apply pressure uniformly over the tool and perhaps slide the sleeve in one go.

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The sleeves come as a kit with a fitting tool: Which you put over the sleeve and fit it with a hammer:

 

sleeve-3.JPG

 

I am not sure about hitting it with a hammer. Maybe as a last resort. But without a proper bench press it would be easy enough to make your own simple fitting tool.

Take two large metal plates with a hole in the middle and a large diameter nut and matching (long enough) bolt.

Pass the bolt through the plates and pulley and sleeve and tighten the nut.until the sleeve is squeezed onto the pulley.

 

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The sleeves come as a kit with a fitting tool: Which you put over the sleeve and fit it with a hammer:

 

sleeve-3.JPG

 

I am not sure about hitting it with a hammer. Maybe as a last resort. But without a proper bench press it would be easy enough to make your own simple fitting tool.

Take two large metal plates with a hole in the middle and a large diameter nut and matching (long enough) bolt.

Pass the bolt through the plates and pulley and sleeve and tighten the nut.until the sleeve is squeezed onto the pulley.

 

 

 

Yew, you can do all of that if you want. Or follow the Speedi Sleeve instructions and use a hammer: http://www.skf.com/uk/products/seals/industrial-seals/power-transmission-seals/wear-sleeves/skf-speedi-sleeve/installing-skf-speedi-sleeve/index.html

 

The sleeves are designed to repair shafts without removing them from machines, i.e. when you cannot use bench presses, hydraulic kit, vices or any other equipment

 

Richard

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And are they the same as the diesel pulley? Calcutt say they are unobtainable, so I would be surprised if the MGB one, which is very common, was the same

 

Richard

Do you have a part no. for the 'Diesel' pulley ?

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Do you have a part no. for the 'Diesel' pulley ?

 

Sorry, no. There is a number cast into the pulley, it doesn't match the parts lists. We checked with an MG specialists

 

Richard

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Sorry, no. There is a number cast into the pulley, it doesn't match the parts lists. We checked with an MG specialists

 

Richard

On my 18V engine the pulley has 12H963 cast into it. This is a 1979 petrol b series.

 

On the Moss website they list 3 pulleys. 1 without a damper (1962 - 3) 12H773, 12963 (64 - 70) and 12H3515 (1970 - 4). Main difference is where the timing marks are, apparently all are interchangeable ( on petrol at least).

Edited by Chalky

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On my 18V engine the pulley has 12H963 cast into it. This is a 1979 petrol b series.

Do you have any dimensions of that pulley?

 

Richard

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Yew, you can do all of that if you want. Or follow the Speedi Sleeve instructions and use a hammer: http://www.skf.com/uk/products/seals/industrial-seals/power-transmission-seals/wear-sleeves/skf-speedi-sleeve/installing-skf-speedi-sleeve/index.html

 

The sleeves are designed to repair shafts without removing them from machines, i.e. when you cannot use bench presses, hydraulic kit, vices or any other equipment

 

Richard

 

 

Yew, you can do all of that if you want. Or follow the Speedi Sleeve instructions and use a hammer: http://www.skf.com/uk/products/seals/industrial-seals/power-transmission-seals/wear-sleeves/skf-speedi-sleeve/installing-skf-speedi-sleeve/index.html

 

The sleeves are designed to repair shafts without removing them from machines, i.e. when you cannot use bench presses, hydraulic kit, vices or any other equipment

 

Richard

 

Great! - if there is room to swing a hammer - boat engines are likely to be too close to the bulkhead to use a hammer.

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This is a pulley from a BMC 1.5/1.8. The key feature is that it is in two parts, separated by a thick rubber section. This allows the outer ring to damp out oscillations in the crankshaft by being connected through a flexible element. Opinions differ on if this is necessary, I'm inclined towards thinking that it is

 

Pulley-1.JPG

 

This is the problem with these pulleys:

 

crack-1.JPG

 

They develop a crack along the keyway. Ditchy's is worse than this with a piece falling out. As this is the surface that the oil seal runs on, it makes a terrible mess

 

Now, if pulleys were easy to find, I would scrap this one. But they are nigh on unobtainable. I have just stripped the pulleys from three engines, and only one is OK

 

So, we need a pragmatic solution, which is a Speed Sleeve:

 

sleeve-1.JPG

 

It's a precision made, thin walled sleeve intended to renew sealing surfaces. In this case, it will seal the crack and stop oil seeping out. It will also put a strengthening hoop around the spigot which will help hold it together.

 

The sleeves come as a kit with a fitting tool:

 

sleeve-2.JPG

 

Which you put over the sleeve and fit it with a hammer:

 

sleeve-3.JPG

 

This is the fitted sleeve:

 

sleeve-4.JPG

 

And it's too long, and hardened, so it needs to be ground off:

 

cut-off-1.JPG

 

And there we are:

 

Pulley-2.JPG

 

Richard

Excellent repair, however I would be concerned that with a cracked keyway of that magnitude how long it will go before it fails.

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If that isn't the most helpful post I've ever seen, I don't remember what the better ones were! I don't have a BMC engine, but I might go and buy one just to ask questions about it now! Nice one, Richard, have a greenie. :)

Seconded! You may just have saved me some head scratching when I finally get my pulley off to renew the oil seal. Thanks!

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