Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Alway Swilby

Attaching Fairleads

Featured Posts

Well, Midland Swindlers call them fairleads. The cleat type things on the grab rails for the centre rope to go through.

Anyway, how would you attach them to the grabrail? There can be quite a pull on them so I suspect a little self tapping screw wouldn't be good enough?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Midland Swindlers call them fairleads. The cleat type things on the grab rails for the centre rope to go through.

Anyway, how would you attach them to the grabrail? There can be quite a pull on them so I suspect a little self tapping screw wouldn't be good enough?

 

 

.. but the main force is likely to be sideways, rather than upwards?

 

I am getting quite tempted by these

 

http://www.cquip.com/shop_1390817511.php

 

or the cleat equivalent, which I saw on a boat recently, for fixing onto the gunwale.

 

http://www.force4.co.uk/force-4-stainless-steel-folding-cleat-8.html?sqr=folding%20cleat.V0dRa_krJxA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Drill and tap M6 or M8 if mounting point is into at least 5mm plate. Secure with matching countersunk head setscrews.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Midland Swindlers call them fairleads. The cleat type things on the grab rails for the centre rope to go through.

Anyway, how would you attach them to the grabrail? There can be quite a pull on them so I suspect a little self tapping screw wouldn't be good enough?

 

That's one reason I wouldn't have them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Curiously, I am just about to refit my fairleads.

 

I will be drilling and tapping the hole to take a nice stainless countersunk head bolt.

Edited by lockedout

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Drill and tap M6 or M8 if mounting point is into at least 5mm plate. Secure with matching countersunk head setscrews.

 

Ditto, had no problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

.. but the main force is likely to be sideways, rather than upwards?

 

I am getting quite tempted by these

 

http://www.cquip.com/shop_1390817511.php

 

or the cleat equivalent, which I saw on a boat recently, for fixing onto the gunwale.

 

http://www.force4.co.uk/force-4-stainless-steel-folding-cleat-8.html?sqr=folding%20cleat.V0dRa_krJxA

Since they only seem to be held on by two screws surely the force of a rope would be more than adequate to shear the screw off? I had my centre rope foul the ventilation mushroom on the roof and it quite gaily sheared all five of the brass screws before unceremoniously catapulting the mushroom itself into the cut sad.png . Are two screws really going to hold?

 

That's one reason I wouldn't have them

I think I'm with you on that. I had thought about getting recesses cut into the grab rail though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was considering just putting a strip of thin brass on the handrail to protect the paint, but have never got round to it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was considering just putting a strip of thin brass on the handrail to protect the paint, but have never got round to it

I was looking at the recesses to stop the centre line 'beheading' my mushroom again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 3 holes in mine, I drilled and tapped the hand rail and used 5mm stainless counter sunk screws but also glued with some flex.

 

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since they only seem to be held on by two screws surely the force of a rope would be more than adequate to shear the screw off? I had my centre rope foul the ventilation mushroom on the roof and it quite gaily sheared all five of the brass screws before unceremoniously catapulting the mushroom itself into the cut sad.png . Are two screws really going to hold?

 

I think I'm with you on that. I had thought about getting recesses cut into the grab rail though.

I'm not 100% on this but surely fairleads are a sticks n rags thing and intended to merely guide a rope rather than constrain it? so not intended to be subject to huge stresses

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not 100% on this but surely fairleads are a sticks n rags thing and intended to merely guide a rope rather than constrain it? so not intended to be subject to huge stresses

Phil

Quite right.

 

Naughty-Cal is fitted with quite a hefty bow fairlead but it is not intended to take any stress or strain from the ropes, it merely guides them to a more convenient angle for mooring. The rope is still taken back to a suitable cleat.

 

DSC_0102.jpg

 

528530_3993435358492_906312426_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since they only seem to be held on by two screws surely the force of a rope would be more than adequate to shear the screw off? I had my centre rope foul the ventilation mushroom on the roof and it quite gaily sheared all five of the brass screws before unceremoniously catapulting the mushroom itself into the cut sad.png . Are two screws really going to hold?

 

Yes maybe surprisingly, they do. Even the M8 brass ones have been fine despite considerable loads whilst single handing in wide locks.

 

FWIW the brass folding roof steps I use are secured by only two M6 setscrews into similar tapped holes in cabin sides, although I did use stainless. Note that as supplied they only have mounting hole clearance for M5 fixings!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Midland Swindlers call them fairleads. The cleat type things on the grab rails for the centre rope to go through.

Anyway, how would you attach them to the grabrail? There can be quite a pull on them so I suspect a little self tapping screw wouldn't be good enough?

 

On my boat I drilled and tapped holes and fixed the fairleads in place with stainless steel countersunk socket screws.

Takes a bit of time, but you only need to do it once...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

FWIW the brass folding roof steps I use are secured by only two M6 setscrews into similar tapped holes in cabin sides, although I did use stainless. Note that as supplied they only have mounting hole clearance for M5 fixings!

If they are only tapped into the cabin sides 4-5mm thick I am not sure which is best, would you get more thread with a 5 mm? I am not an expert on threads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If fixing into thin plate (not ideal) probably best to use metric fine screw threads. That said I used ordinary m6 on the fairleads on our cabin and they have survived 12 years of abuse now (I agree they are not really designed for this type of load.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When they fail they do not get torn out of the rail. The 5mm set screws are not strong enough and snap off. I have had this happen because the wind blew me sideways into a lifted lift bridge. I've had a second one "ping" off aftermy wife wrapped the rope around the fingers of the fairlead without the boat being stationary.

 

In both cases I was able to drill out the remains of the bolt, tap new threads and go up to M6. As someone else said the fairleads holes also had to be opened out because they are only of M5 size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was about to post a question on these but "the search function" HAS saved a repeated posting. THAT said, do you think that "rivet nuts" would be strong enough rather than tapping into the handrail? - whilst I don't intend on them being under much strain (one either side for twin centre lines) in reality, I'll probably forget when single handing and put a bit of strain on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- whilst I don't intend on them being under much strain (one either side for twin centre lines) in reality, I'll probably forget when single handing and put a bit of strain on them.

That's exactly my arrangement and usage. There can be a bit of strain I guess, but it's a handling line so you really should be in control of that stress at all times. Even if you're using it to take the last bit of way off, you'll be allowing some slip to gradually bring the boat to a halt. Maybe 2 turns round a bollard for an instant stop from 2mph would shear the bolts, but that wouldn't be the finest display of boat handling!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's exactly my arrangement and usage. There can be a bit of strain I guess, but it's a handling line so you really should be in control of that stress at all times. Even if you're using it to take the last bit of way off, you'll be allowing some slip to gradually bring the boat to a halt. Maybe 2 turns round a bollard for an instant stop from 2mph would shear the bolts, but that wouldn't be the finest display of boat handling!

I have found myself in that position a few times! Let the centre rope out as long as possible and it behaves like a big elastic band, taking a lot of the stress off the fairlead. Also wrings the rope out if it is wet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found myself in that position a few times! Let the centre rope out as long as possible and it behaves like a big elastic band, taking a lot of the stress off the fairlead. Also wrings the rope out if it is wet.

 

Take a turn and gently check away to ease the strain as you bring the boat to a controlled stop is how I've best seen it put! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take a turn and gently check away to ease the strain as you bring the boat to a controlled stop is how I've best seen it put! biggrin.png

Yes that is how I have seen horse drawn boats brought to a halt. I usually get the rope around my leg or similar when trying this ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.