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Donna

Finance

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Has anyone heard of SGB finance? And would you recommend them?

http://cgi-bo.orcaformation.com/sgb/accueil.php

 

 

I found a link on the Walton Marina website.

http://www.waltonmarine.co.uk/Finance.aspx

 

Apart from Pegasus, I have not been able to find any Marine finance companies and I would need to borrow more than I could get from a personal loan.

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i used barclays when i bought my first boat, and my second boat i purchased from roy scott larch as a finance repossession i have heard roy scott larch have closed down but formed something new perhaps this new company is it

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Don't think it's them, these appear to be a French outfit.

 

 

 

SGB Finance SA is a finance institution incorporated under French law with a share capital of Euros 6,054,250 and registered at the Commercial Register in Lille Métropole under number SIREN 422 518 746, having its registered office at 69 Avenue de Flandre 59700 Marcq-en-Baroeul, France. SGB Finance is regulated by the Banque de France

http://cgi-bo.orcaformation.com/sgb/SGB_Email_brochure.pdf

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Has anyone heard of SGB finance? And would you recommend them?

http://cgi-bo.orcaformation.com/sgb/accueil.php

 

 

I found a link on the Walton Marina website.

http://www.waltonmarine.co.uk/Finance.aspx

 

Apart from Pegasus, I have not been able to find any Marine finance companies and I would need to borrow more than I could get from a personal loan.

 

Marine finance or marine mortgage companies are like hens teeth.

 

One option would be to use a combination of a personal loan and any equity you might have in your house (if you have any!)

Edited by MJG

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It's not the quickest solution, but the best finance plan for buying a boat is: save up until you can afford one. Then buy one.

 

It's the cheapest option (whilst you're saving, your money can be earning interest) and, ultimately, the most rewarding. It's how Mrs. Athy and I got our first boat, and I can still recall how marvellous it felt when we took over ownership.

 

If, of course, you want a boat tomorrow, this path will not suit you.

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It's not the quickest solution, but the best finance plan for buying a boat is: save up until you can afford one. Then buy one.

 

It's the cheapest option (whilst you're saving, your money can be earning interest) and, ultimately, the most rewarding. It's how Mrs. Athy and I got our first boat, and I can still recall how marvellous it felt when we took over ownership.

 

If, of course, you want a boat tomorrow, this path will not suit you.

 

That rather depends if you would rather die before actually owning a boat or if you have a lot of disposable income to play with.

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It's not the quickest solution, but the best finance plan for buying a boat is: save up until you can afford one. Then buy one.

 

It's the cheapest option (whilst you're saving, your money can be earning interest) and, ultimately, the most rewarding. It's how Mrs. Athy and I got our first boat, and I can still recall how marvellous it felt when we took over ownership.

 

If, of course, you want a boat tomorrow, this path will not suit you.

 

That was going to be our plan too - but bank of dad came to the rescue and helped us out :) We're paying him back, but it's not quite the same!

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That rather depends if you would rather die before actually owning a boat or if you have a lot of disposable income to play with.

I do see what you mean - but paying the whole lot in one go, without borrowing, costs less. So you're more likely to die before you've paid your loan back, as it will be a greater sum of money. Obviously we don't know the O.P.'s circumstances, butg the money has to come from somewhere, be it for immediate cash purchase or for paying off a loan.

 

Not quite sure what you mean by "disposable income" - the same as savings? I don't remember how long it took Mrs. Athy and me to save up for our first n/b, but we were on a schoolmaster's and a nursing sister's salaries, so earning well but certainly not in the rich bracket.

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I do see what you mean - but paying the whole lot in one go, without borrowing, costs less. So you're more likely to die before you've paid your loan back, as it will be a greater sum of money. Obviously we don't know the O.P.'s circumstances, butg the money has to come from somewhere, be it for immediate cash purchase or for paying off a loan.

 

Not quite sure what you mean by "disposable income" - the same as savings? I don't remember how long it took Mrs. Athy and me to save up for our first n/b, but we were on a schoolmaster's and a nursing sister's salaries, so earning well but certainly not in the rich bracket.

 

Disposable income is the amount between what you have coming in and what you have to spend on essential items - basically the amount 'spare'.

 

You can indeed choose to save to buy a boat with any part of this or you can choose to service a loan and have you boat now rather then in several years time.

 

With interest rates as they are you may as well (in my opinion) exploit them with a loan because saving is going to generate virtually no additional funds to add to the pot.

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Disposable income is the amount between what you have coming in and what you have to spend on essential items - basically the amount 'spare'.

 

You can indeed choose to save to buy a boat with any part of this or you can choose to service a loan and have you boat now rather then in several years time.

 

With interest rates as they are you may as well (in my opinion) exploit them with a loan because saving is going to generate virtually no additional funds to add to the pot.

There is something in what you say. From memory, at that time (1997) a loan would have cost us about 10% or more. Currently they're much more reasonable.

 

But we did not have to wait an inordinate length of time before we'd saved up enough - perhaps a year and a half, and it took us almost that long to find a boat that we wanted! I guess that being "dinkies" helped.

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I would go the loan route. Interest payable isn't too high and you get to enjoy a boat straight away. Sometimes owning a boat can save you money, it can certainly help your mental health. Ian .

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I would go the loan route. Interest payable isn't too high and you get to enjoy a boat straight away. Sometimes owning a boat can save you money, it can certainly help your mental health. Ian .

 

Hmm.

 

There speaks an optimist.

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Hmm.

 

There speaks an optimist.

Well yes I am. Though our boats has saved us money over the years we have oowned them.

 

Ian.

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That's simply the effect of the definition of a boat: "Large hole in the water into which you throw money."

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That's simply the effect of the definition of a boat: "Large hole in the water into which you throw money."

 

'Large hole in the throat into which I throw money' is nearer the truth!

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I spent a few months improving my credit rating and then bought my boat with a combination of an unsecured personal loan and credit card. But I didn't have any capital to anchor a big loan onto.

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That's simply the effect of the definition of a boat: "Large hole in the water into which you throw money."

You could always buy a marina. Then it becomes "a large hole in the water into which OTHERS throw money" :)

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Well yes I am. Though our boats has saved us money over the years we have oowned them.

 

Ian.

 

Well, mine too, I suppose. Had I not bought a boat I would have bought an aeroplane and that would have cost even more than the boat to maintain, so the boat has saved me money.

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Can any of you financially-aware tell my why there's always too much month left at the end of my money?

You are using the wrong calendar.

Use one with 20 days per month, your problem will be solved.

 

Bod

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You are confusing boats with beer.

 

It's an easy mistake to make. Same initial letter, same number of letters (well BOAT is). Same cost per annum. Both drive you to the pub!

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