Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
davidc

Warcry Sally army

Featured Posts

Was watching a episode of all creatures great and small and in one scene the sally army was selling warcry

and I remembered in my youth in Newcastle the sally army was always coming into pubs selling warcry and no one give them a hard time

but its been years if not decades since I saw that does anyone know if there still go into pubs and selling warcry

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was watching a episode of all creatures great and small and in one scene the sally army was selling warcry

and I remembered in my youth in Newcastle the sally army was always coming into pubs selling warcry and no one give them a hard time

but its been years if not decades since I saw that does anyone know if there still go into pubs and selling warcry

I've never seen them recently doing that but they have gone hi-tech and do publish an abridged online version along with there 'is an app for that'.

 

http://www.salvationarmy.org.uk/warcry

 

(I'm an atheist but the Sally Army is one of the charities I have the hugest respect for)

Edited by MJG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never seen them recently doing that but they have gone hi-tech and do publish an online version.

 

http://www.salvationarmy.org.uk/warcry

 

(I'm an atheist but the Sally Army is one of the charities I have the hugest respect for)

my late father grew up in the slums of Newcastle in the 1930's and he did not have a good word for religious do gooders but the sally army was different In his experience the sally army feed and clothed the poor but did not demand religious observation in return

or did there judge people

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

..

ed.

Just realised I've posted something the cynics will pick holes in.

Edited by MJG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

..

ed.

Just realised I've posted something the cynics will pick holes in.

doesn't that say everything about them.

 

 

you implying we have cynics on this forum

 

captain.gif

Edited by davidc
  • Greenie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(I'm an atheist but the Sally Army is one of the charities I have the hugest respect for)

 

OK, its the Guardian, so will no doubt get dismissed as Leftie nonsense.

 

Also I acknowledge it is longer ago than I remember it....

 

Salvation Army called to account by charity watchdog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps I wasn't clear enough - I was actually talking about the work they do at 'ground level'.

 

The issue, (not just the one I raise in my post), is that however dedicated those working at ground level may be, there seems to be considerable doubt about whether giving them money or goods is an effective way of making a charitable donation.

 

I couldn't quickly turn up an independent figure with Googling, but IIRC the percentage of what you give that actually benefits charitable causes is low. From memory a very large part still goes to "evangelising" and trying to convert people to the faith.

 

I know it doesn't have to go with the territory - the former senior SA chaplain working with disadvantaged on the waterways was very strong on helping, and spent no time at all preaching, so yes they can do very good works, but I believe there are far more effective causes to donate to,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The issue, (not just the one I raise in my post), is that however dedicated those working at ground level may be, there seems to be considerable doubt about whether giving them money or goods is an effective way of making a charitable donation.

 

I couldn't quickly turn up an independent figure with Googling, but IIRC the percentage of what you give that actually benefits charitable causes is low. From memory a very large part still goes to "evangelising" and trying to convert people to the faith.

 

I know it doesn't have to go with the territory - the former senior SA chaplain working with disadvantaged on the waterways was very strong on helping, and spent no time at all preaching, so yes they can do very good works, but I believe there are far more effective causes to donate to,

I have seen them 'in action' so to speak personally and professionally so still have respect for them.

  • Greenie 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen them 'in action' so to speak personally and professionally so still have respect for them.

Agree they do good work on the ground. I know where Alan is coming from though , in the past a few of us paid for books etc each year enabling an entire class to go through schooling in Bangladesh we did this via a local person related to one of the group. This cost less I was told than annual housing rent on the area manager of a major charity

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The issue, (not just the one I raise in my post), is that however dedicated those working at ground level may be, there seems to be considerable doubt about whether giving them money or goods is an effective way of making a charitable donation.

 

I couldn't quickly turn up an independent figure with Googling, but IIRC the percentage of what you give that actually benefits charitable causes is low. From memory a very large part still goes to "evangelising" and trying to convert people to the faith.

 

I know it doesn't have to go with the territory - the former senior SA chaplain working with disadvantaged on the waterways was very strong on helping, and spent no time at all preaching, so yes they can do very good works, but I believe there are far more effective causes to donate to,

The whole point about the Salvation Army is that they ARE hands on. Most of it is voluntary. That's why I also admire them.

 

Actions don't only speak louder than words, it also speaks louder than money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My uncle, who was agnostic always had a lot of time for the SA. His father died when he was a baby in WW1 and he claimed the Sally Army were the only ones who helped his mother out. My memories are of cute girls in hats and sensible shoes playing Ding Dong Merrily at Christmas. I haven't seen the Warcry in a pub since the 1980s and I don't recall them getting grief either, even in some of the less salubrious establishments we used to favour.

 

Like any large organisation, including the religiously inspired ones, the people on the ground are worth three of the ones in head office. I'm less well disposed the the JWs and their apocalyptic millennialism. On the few occasions I got further than "no thank you", it was like talking to a robot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm less well disposed the the JWs and their apocalyptic millennialism. On the few occasions I got further than "no thank you", it was like talking to a robot.

How very well expressed.

 

I have the highest regard for the Sally Army. The way they would go into The Nobber's Arms or wherever and smile cheerfully and non-judgementally at the cohorts of large half-cut blokes showed no little guts, determination and belief. As noted above, most of the half-cut blokes would smile back, mumble and hand over their twenty pence or however much it was, though I do wonder how many of them actually read their War Cry when they got home. I do hope the Sallies are still doing the rounds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen them 'in action' so to speak personally and professionally so still have respect for them.

greenie martin i give to the christmas collection i was assured that all of my donation went to feed people at chrismas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

I am happy to get a copy of the War Cry from a SA person weekly, he has a 'pitch' on Chesham High Street. Not sure if they go into pubs as I rarely go into them nowadays.

 

Sadly the local branch of the SA closed in Chesham recently (established in 1895) and has merged with with branch in Hemel.

 

L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot remember the reason but I do believe that they stopped doing pubs .They always got a fair bit of money in my local on a Friday night and only a couple of war cry's where taken.

One query I have though is their latest advert is asking for £21 for a Christmas dinner for some deserving soul this will be cooked and served by volunteers ?

A pub in Wokingham albeit not Xmas day is doing Xmas dinners 3 courses for the same amount of £21 but paying staff and making a profit ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember my dad bringing me a bottle of ginger beer,a bag of crisps(with blue packet of salt) & the Junior 'War Cry' after his weekly visit to the local.Happy days.Nowadays,I really begin to feel Chrismassy once I've heard the Sally Anny brass band playing carols.

Trina

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I couldn't quickly turn up an independent figure with Googling, but IIRC the percentage of what you give that actually benefits charitable causes is low. From memory a very large part still goes to "evangelising" and trying to convert people to the faith.

 

 

The "advancement of religion" remains with prevention/ relief of poverty as a charitable purpose under the Charities Act. So, even from your memory a very large part does go to charitable causes . It might be interesting to know the proportions spend on which areas although the two are not divisible in the life of the Salvation Army, may make it a difficult exercise.

 

 

No connection with the Salvation Army - beyond having the utmost respect.

Edited by Tacet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stand to be corrected , by those who can find the information , but I recall my brother ranting about how much the " TOP PEOPLE " in charities were paid , the only real one was the Salvation Army ,the top guy was , if I remember correctly , on £ 20.000. as opposed to approx £200.000 of others. Also their charity shops are great !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stand to be corrected , by those who can find the information , but I recall my brother ranting about how much the " TOP PEOPLE " in charities were paid , the only real one was the Salvation Army ,the top guy was , if I remember correctly , on £ 20.000. as opposed to approx £200.000 of others. Also their charity shops are great !

I posted this earlier but removed it because of the inevitable cynical comments other parts of the article would generate.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2002/sep/25/8

 

He earns ( according to the article) £10,258, but things like housing are provided whilst in the job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He earns ( according to the article) £10,258, but things like housing are provided whilst in the job.

...a similar arrangement to the one which parsons (as we used to call them - that word is rarely heard now) have.

 

How refreshing to read of the head of anything who hasn't got his snout in the trough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a lighter note, does anybody recall that as well as flogging "War Cry" in pubs they also had a publication called "Young Soldier", I think aimed at a more youthful audience?

I well remember a young and innocent looking girl in full SA regalia asking a student I knew who was openly gay if she could interest him in a "young soldier" - I'm not sure she even understood the enthusiasm of his reply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.