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Pre purchase survey and reasons to haggle on the price agreed

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Hi all

Survey done, I met the surveyor briefly during his work. He outlined several issues, many of which were expected to be brought to our attention

 

However, the surveyor informed us that the battery bank and starting battery are ready for renewal.

I queried if I should go back to the broker to haggle the agreed price down a little.

 

He said basically batteries were to be considered consumable items and as such, I will have little recourse.

I'm thinking, that if when I leave the marina heading to our new moorings, these fail and we're left in a pickle, I'm not going to be too happy........

 

I accept we have probably managed to get this boat at a good price, and I may be rocking the boat (no pun intended) by attempting to shave extra off the asking price.

 

TBH I'm looking for some of your views and would welcome your valued experience in these matters.

 

Cheers

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Hi all

Survey done, I met the surveyor briefly during his work. He outlined several issues, many of which were expected to be brought to our attention

 

However, the surveyor informed us that the battery bank and starting battery are ready for renewal.

I queried if I should go back to the broker to haggle the agreed price down a little.

 

He said basically batteries were to be considered consumable items and as such, I will have little recourse.

I'm thinking, that if when I leave the marina heading to our new moorings, these fail and we're left in a pickle, I'm not going to be too happy........

 

I accept we have probably managed to get this boat at a good price, and I may be rocking the boat (no pun intended) by attempting to shave extra off the asking price.

 

TBH I'm looking for some of your views and would welcome your valued experience in these matters.

 

Cheers

 

is the boat being brokered by a boat broker?

 

If yes you might find the seller is bound to pay up to a certain percentage of such repairs/replacement costs depending on the wording of the sales agreement they have.

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is the boat being brokered by a boat broker?

 

If yes you might find the seller is bound to pay up to a certain percentage of such repairs/replacement costs depending on the wording of the sales agreement they have.

Surly the seller can say " thats the price of the boat, take it or leave it."

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What test did the surveyor carry out to know that the batteries were near end of life or is he acting on the age of the batteries?

I'm still awaiting his final report, but he had the engine running and the lights were very dim when he turned off the engine to discuss this.

Hopefully. The report should arrive In the next few days.

 

MJG - yes the sale is through a broker, I will scrutinise the contract ☺

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Surly the seller can say " thats the price of the boat, take it or leave it."

As I say it depends what the agreement the seller has signed and under what circumstances the seller can do that, yes they can do it but it may incur a penalty if a formal offer has been made and accepted and a sales agreement has been signed by buyer and seller.

 

All this is irrelevant if it's a private sale of course.

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Surly the seller can say " thats the price of the boat, take it or leave it."

 

Yes I'm aware he could do this as he knows full well I have invested in a survey, so I'm not likely to bail on this for the sake of a few hundred pounds.

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To be honest the chances of buying a second hand boat with tip top batteries is fairly slim. Chances are they would be "mid-life" and personally I'd probably want to fit new batteries anyway, though that would to some extent depend on the intended usage - you can get away with pretty rubbish batteries for a summer holiday boat, not for a winter live-aboard.

 

I think your problem is that the surveyor has not done any proper testing, though it's quite likely his gut feeling is correct. As said, batteries are a consumable so in some ways it would be like complaining that the diesel tank wasn't full.

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We bought our boat for a very good price. The surveyor found a few issues that would need fixing, all of which have come to fruition:

 

corrosion around the chimney for the Trumo Gas water and warm air heater. Started leaking about 3 months after purchase.

 

corrosion around stove chimney collar - started leaking about 6 months after purchase, so removed collar and flue,, cleaned painted and refitted. Top of flue corroded through about a year after purchase, (maybe 2 years?)... replaced flue.

 

Batteries knackered - replaced domestics 3 times in 4 years :( havent replaced engine start at all.

 

rudder stock stiff... needed greasing, and did it earlier this year.

 

Did I attempt to negotiate? Not a chance!! I wanted the bill of sale signed, and for it to be mine, with as little messing about as possible.

 

The stuff the surveyor found paled into insignificance when compared with the agreed price.

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I think it is always a balance between knowing a secondhand boat is a used item and not everything is going to be perfect. It sounds as if the major problem that the surveyor has come up with is the batteries. If that is correct then that is very little.

 

First question in my mind is how long has the boat been there without the batteries being charged, if it is several months then it is possible that they might just need a good charge. But lets say they are finished, could you not ask the broker to arrange for the batteries to be replaced at your cost before you move the boat? That would remove the problems of moving a boat with suspect batteries.

 

Oh BTW it never hurts to ask for a contribution towards the batteries from the vendor, worst they can say is no and nothing has changed, or yes and there is a contribution.

Edited by Graham.m

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You can always haggle on the price but beware that the vendor may just say that enough is enough and pull out of the sale. That leaves you having forked out for a survey that is now of no use to your at all.

 

Batteries are a consumable item. Why don't you just budget fitting a new set? That way you know that you are starting with a fresh set of batteries. If the vendor fit a set it is likely to just be the cheapest they can find, if you fit a set you can put in what you want.

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No harm in asking when I bought Maisie Jane this summer the batteries we well and truly knackered I ask for a contribution the seller said no but brought the boat anyway good price and i want the boat.

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If you negotiated 'hard' to get to your current price then the seller - especially as it is batteries - will probably take offence, but if you are still at the original asking price, I would expect most sellers in the current economic climate had factored in some 'negotiation' money, in other words were probably expecting a lower offer than asking price, so in that case there is no harm in asking as money may be 'set aside'.

 

Other things to consider is how long has it been available? If just a short time then the seller may be happy to wait, but if it is a long time the broker is probably pushing the seller to reduce a bit as the broker wants the sale.

 

Remember all the interested parties want this sale to to place, so use that to your advantage.

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I think it's been asked but, did you hand over a deposit and you and the seller, or broker on sellers behalf, sign a contract agreeing the sale subject to survey, and did it give you the right to renegotiate in some way, (I think there are some standard contracts that brokers can use which accommodate this type of thing).

 

If so, does it look like it's "allowed" to renegotiate over the batteries, and in what way? If you, (and your surveyor?), think it's allowed, without the seller being able to withdraw from the sale, then it might be worth having a go.

 

If no express contract, even with a deposit, the seller, and buyer, will be free to withdraw from the transaction for no reason*. If you have negotiated a "good price", do you want to take the chance that the seller "sees his backside", and walks away as a matter of principle, even if not the money.

 

For a few hundred quid in a tens of thousand pound deal, and a "consumable" item, do you want to rock the boat, or just get on with your life and buy the boat.

 

*There might have been an implied contract created by some of the things both parties said to each other, but good luck with agreeing that in your favour :)

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From what I understand about batteries is they don't like being discharged. if They're left discharged for any length of time, then even a relatively new battery might not recover.

 

The problem, as far as batteries are concerned, with a brokerage boat is; the broker isn't likely to go around charging up all the boat's batteries.

So, even if they're new, I think anyone buying a boat from brokerage should anticipate that batteries will need replacing.

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From what I understand about batteries is they don't like being discharged. if They're left discharged for any length of time, then even a relatively new battery might not recover.

 

The problem, as far as batteries are concerned, with a brokerage boat is; the broker isn't likely to go around charging up all the boat's batteries.

So, even if they're new, I think anyone buying a boat from brokerage should anticipate that batteries will need replacing.

I think you are right. I wouldn't fit new batteries now. I would take it away and ensure the charging system is 100% before fitting new batteries. What is the worst that can happen, the lights go dim and you go to bed. Maybe with a good days run, 6-8 hrs as you take it home things may pick up.

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From what I understand about batteries is they don't like being discharged. if They're left discharged for any length of time, then even a relatively new battery might not recover.

 

The problem, as far as batteries are concerned, with a brokerage boat is; the broker isn't likely to go around charging up all the boat's batteries.

So, even if they're new, I think anyone buying a boat from brokerage should anticipate that batteries will need replacing.

 

 

 

 

When we bought our boat in the summer our surveyor said the same. Although the batteries weren't great, they lasted over the summer with a little bit of solar. I changed them about 4 weeks ago.

I didn't try to renegotiate price as was happy with it.

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Received the report, the surveyor didn't actually check the batteries, but noted the leisure battery bank was flat on his arrival at the test.

Looking back at a recent visit to view the NB, it was a frosty morning and with a little effort the starting battery fired her up, so the battery can't be all that bad

 

I think I will suck up the cost of new leisure batteries as most of the report was favourable and the negative points noted were mostly anticipated prior to negotiations, and as such reflected our price pitched.

 

Many good comments giving food for thought, but we will attempt to make our way to our new moorings with generator and battery charger to hand in case of emergency, hopefully this side of Christmas. A two day cruise, so should hopefully get some juice into those batteries before she rests for a while.

 

Im hoping to spend much of the next few months getting the NB into a better shape in preparation for the spring.

So.................. I think it safe to say I'll be back with more questions before long.

 

Cheers

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Received the report, the surveyor didn't actually check the batteries, but noted the leisure battery bank was flat on his arrival at the test.

Looking back at a recent visit to view the NB, it was a frosty morning and with a little effort the starting battery fired her up, so the battery can't be all that bad

 

I think I will suck up the cost of new leisure batteries as most of the report was favourable and the negative points noted were mostly anticipated prior to negotiations, and as such reflected our price pitched.

 

Many good comments giving food for thought, but we will attempt to make our way to our new moorings with generator and battery charger to hand in case of emergency, hopefully this side of Christmas. A two day cruise, so should hopefully get some juice into those batteries before she rests for a while.

 

Im hoping to spend much of the next few months getting the NB into a better shape in preparation for the spring.

So.................. I think it safe to say I'll be back with more questions before long.

 

Cheers

I would put off new batteries until I was ready to cruise. If you dont have shore supply a solar panel is a great help. I use a couple when the boat is left but remove them before I go cruising, there is not enough power in mine to recharge the batteries but it maintains them well.

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I would put off new batteries until I was ready to cruise. If you dont have shore supply a solar panel is a great help. I use a couple when the boat is left but remove them before I go cruising, there is not enough power in mine to recharge the batteries but it maintains them well.

I'm hoping the leisure batteries can wait until spring, or at least until I know all is OK with the charging system, as suggested.... If I can, with all your help ☺

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I'm hoping the leisure batteries can wait until spring, or at least until I know all is OK with the charging system, as suggested.... If I can, with all your help ☺

If you're not going to use the boat until spring, why not take all the batteries home and give them a good charge where you can keep an eye on them?

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