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davidc

What would you miss most about work

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What 'Free rides'? Most of us pay licence fees, don't we?

I read Peterboats post and thought immediately of this https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7O9f5UhdWlE

 

And here's the lyrics :)

 

Pretty girl on the hood of a Cadilac, yeah....

She's broken down on freeway nine.

I take a look and her engine's started,

I leave her purring and I roll on by.... Bye bye

 

Free love on the free love freeway,

The love is free and the freeway's long...

I got some hot love on the hot-love freeway

I ain't going home cos' my baby's gone

A little while later, see a senorita,

She's caught a flat trying to make it home,

She says "Por favor, can you pump me up?"

I say "Muchos gracias, adios. Bye Bye."

 

Free love on the freelove freeway,

The love is free and the freeway's long

I got some hot love on the hotlove highway,

Ain't going home 'cause my baby's gone.

 

Little while later I see a cowboy crying,

"Hey buddy, what can I do?"

He says "I lived a good life, had about a thousand women."

I said "Why the tears?", he says "'cause none of them was you."

Free love on the free love freeway,

Where the love is free and the freeway is long...

I got some hot love on the hot-love freeway

I ain't going home cos' my baby's gone

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This topic title has really got me thinking about the complex decision of when to retire. The IT contract I've been doing for over 9 years now is probably my last, because if I lost it or gave it up I'd have to invest quite a lot of time and effort learning more up to date skills if I then wanted to get more work. I've been carrying on part time, and while the job is OK and there is some satisfaction in doing it, it can also be tedious, and I really wouldn't miss it. No longer having to worry about supporting a live computer application morning and night would feel strange but very welcome. So it's just a question of balancing up my likely income and expenditure over the coming years and guessing whether I can afford to retire yet.

 

The trouble is, there are so many variables that the decision has to be a stab in the dark. To name a few, there's my mother who's in a nursing home, my son who might either move out or start paying me some rent, and there's the question of whether my ambition to do more boating can be satisfied just by crewing for other people, or will I buy my own boat, and if so on what sort of budget and how much of the time will I live on it? Marina or CC? Pump out or cassette? Who could I press-gang as crew? Add to that the choices I could make about my fairly valuable house in Croydon and its mortgage, and the complete unpredictably of how long my health, currently pretty good, will last, and I could go around in circles forever if I'm not careful.

 

On balance my current thinking is that I'll be easing myself out of the office door in a year at most, and keeping the house but probably gradually spending less time here and more on the canals, drawing some of my pension each year to finance it all. It's a plan which will slowly evolve according to what happens, but meanwhile there are preparations I know I need to do anyway. There is a lot of de-cluttering to do.

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Is it really work then? Or a hobby you get paid for?

I get paid for the jobs I do and enjoy doing the jobs.

:)

So in a sense I do not work, assuming the definition of work is something one does not enjoy.

:)

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I'm incredibly lucky in that I step in and out of the workplace. We take summers off to explore on our boat and work winters. This is the first year I've gone back to a previous workplace (I have been asked before) because I really enjoyed working with my colleagues and felt comfortable and useful there. I love our summers of freedom but I do need enforced structure in my days, left to my own devices I turn into a vampire an stay up until the ear!y hours and then sleep all day. Working gets me back to normal.

 

Plus I miss the comraderie of the office. Being a temp I'm exempt from office politics and have the bonus of hearing all sides because I'm seen as an outsider. Most of all I get to do what I do best - sort out their control accounts, VAT issues and make a difference. No appraisals as well - I hated them when I was a permanent employee.

 

Much as I hate having to get up in the morning again I'm glad to be back in the workplace again.

 

At the end of May I'll be happy to be on my way - one of my colleagues jokingly said "I put £2 in your leaving collection - I hope you don't expect that again" :)

 

ETA and I feel useful after a season where my HS rendered me useless on the boat. Usefulness should never be underrated.

Edited by Ange

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For the people that say they wouldn't miss anything from work, then find another job/career path that you would miss something from work from. You spend a lot of time at work and to not feel you would miss something from it is a waste of your time.

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Slightly off topic but I peeked at the Daily Mail this morning:

 

"Britons have been warned to watch out for rats invading their homes after the odds were slashed on it being the coldest winter in a century."

 

I liked this comment:

 

"The only rats we need to worry about are the ones in government."

 

Carry on. As you were...

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Slightly off topic but I peeked at the Daily Mail this morning:

 

 

Oh Foxy.....mentioning The Daily M*** on here is likely to cause apoplexy among certain members shame on you (snigger)

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For the people that say they wouldn't miss anything from work, then find another job/career path that you would miss something from work from. You spend a lot of time at work and to not feel you would miss something from it is a waste of your time.

That's a sweeping statement.

 

Not everyone will have the luxury of the time or money to retrain for a different career.

Others won't have the ability to do anything but the most mundane and menial jobs, doesn't make their value or worth to society or themselves any less.

 

Im fortunate to do a job I enjoy for a company I like working for (I've been here coming up 15 years so it can't be all bad)

Others are not so lucky, I can only imagine what being stuck in a dead end job might be like.

Edited by gazza

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When I wake up on a morning like this, and look out at the blattering rain, I really am rather grateful I don't have to go off to the market any more.

 

Anyway, the people on here aren't really representative, most having another, addictive, occupation anyway (boating, that is!).

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That's a sweeping statement.

 

Not everyone will have the luxury of the time or money to retrain for a different career.

Others won't have the ability to do anything but the most mundane and menial jobs, doesn't make their value or worth to society or themselves any less.

 

Im fortunate to do a job I enjoy for a company I like working for (I've been here coming up 15 years so it can't be all bad)

Others are not so lucky, I can only imagine what being stuck in a dead end job might be like.

 

It's a true sweeping statement, if you don't like your job or career do something about it. Most people's job satisfaction are based on how well you get on with your colleagues/boss and the company you work for and not how mundane it may be.

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It's a true sweeping statement, if you don't like your job or career do something about it. Most people's job satisfaction are based on how well you get on with your colleagues/boss and the company you work for and not how mundane it may be.

I know.....

My boss of 14 years retired last Christmas, his replacement is immeasurably better, the enjoyment I now get out of work is greater than it was 12 months agi

 

What you say is correct for those of us able to do something about it.

It doesn't stand scrutiny for a large proportion of people who can't though.

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I know.....

My boss of 14 years retired last Christmas, his replacement is immeasurably better, the enjoyment I now get out of work is greater than it was 12 months agi

 

What you say is correct for those of us able to do something about it.

It doesn't stand scrutiny for a large proportion of people who can't though.

 

There's no such thing as can't, only those that can't be bothered.

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It's a true sweeping statement, if you don't like your job or career do something about it.

Absolutely. If you don't like your job, don't stay there moaning, go and do something else. If you aren't capable of doing anything else, shut up and get on with your job.

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Have to say I've been giving a lot to think over (have been to physio at the hospital will be off another 2-4 weeks)

Can I throw something in to the debate with out being stoned.

 

Do people think being in a relationship when retired enriches retirement or makes no difference.

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>snip<

What you say is correct for those of us able to do something about it.

It doesn't stand scrutiny for a large proportion of people who can't though.

 

 

 

There's no such thing as can't, only those that can't be bothered.

 

 

Absolutely. If you don't like your job, don't stay there moaning, go and do something else. If you aren't capable of doing anything else, shut up and get on with your job.

 

I think both those answers are a bit unfair, sometimes people can be trapped in a job they dislike because of external circumstance.

Choosing to leave and find other work has to be balanced (by some) against commitments they may have to families or dependants. Life is not always as simple.

 

 

 

Have to say I've been giving a lot to think over (have been to physio at the hospital will be off another 2-4 weeks)

Can I throw something in to the debate with out being stoned.

 

Do people think being in a relationship when retired enriches retirement or makes no difference.

 

it depends on the relationship and the person concerned (I know it's avoiding the question)

loneliness can be a major problem for some people and some find it hard to make that circle of friends and acquaintances that they need.

Others are quite happy with their own company

And some, like me, are a bit of each

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Choosing to leave and find other work has to be balanced (by some) against commitments they may have to families or dependants. Life is not always as simple.

 

 

That's just an excuse, you don't have to leave work first to find another job or career path. You just have to look for another job, if the grass isn't greener then continue doing so.

Edited by Robbo

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I quite enjoyed some of my 16 diverse jobs over the years. I much prefer retirement though. Gives me chance to do some voluntary stuff, and do the things i have always wanted to do. Learned to swim last year, go to see the kids in Germany a lot, spend loads of time on the boat, at the gym etc (now 13 stone instead of 15.) The original question was what do I miss about work? The short answer is "nowt."

Edited by catweasel

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I think both those answers are a bit unfair, sometimes people can be trapped in a job they dislike because of external circumstance.

 

 

Then, as I said, if they can't do anything else they should shut up and get on with the job which they have got.

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That's just an excuse, you don't have to leave work first to find another job or career path. You just have to look for another job, if the grass isn't greener then continue doing so.

You'd be popular in Redcar!!

 

 

 

 

 

I think both those answers are a bit unfair, sometimes people can be trapped in a job they dislike because of external circumstance.

Choosing to leave and find other work has to be balanced (by some) against commitments they may have to families or dependants. Life is not always as simple.

 

 

 

 

it depends on the relationship and the person concerned (I know it's avoiding the question)

loneliness can be a major problem for some people and some find it hard to make that circle of friends and acquaintances that they need.

Others are quite happy with their own company

And some, like me, are a bit of each

Agreed :)

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For the people that say they wouldn't miss anything from work, then find another job/career path that you would miss something from work from. You spend a lot of time at work and to not feel you would miss something from it is a waste of your time.

 

I had arguably one of the most exciting careers available for 29 years (RAF fast-jet pilot) but I certainly don't miss a minute of it. Retirement is the best thing I ever did (apart from gaining the qualifications for the job in the first place). I miss the crew-room 'banter' (always VERY non-PC) but I still have those friends.

 

Nope, I miss nothing from work.

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I would miss getting screwed around by my incompetent boss that thinks it is okay to text me a few hours before my shift to tell me that I'm not needed until Friday giving me only 15hrs of work this week.

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I would miss getting screwed around by my incompetent boss that thinks it is okay to text me a few hours before my shift to tell me that I'm not needed until Friday giving me only 15hrs of work this week.

you should remind your boss txts arnt always instant phone calls are better

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I sold my business and "retired" at age 37. Relocated to Texas with my American wife and drove myself crazy within a few months. I went back to work at the University of Texas for fifteen years before the BS of working for such an institution again dictated "retirement". Complete change of pace got me into construction and I still dabble in property development a couple of days a week.

My son in England has a successful business and offered me the opportunity to manage the financial aspects of it as he hates "business", much preferring the hands on aspects. So, I'm heading back to the UK next spring.....never going to retire completely. It's good to keep a hand in the game for me.

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