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My batteries have gotten worse over the last couple of weeks, to the point that they now hardly hold the charge when basic devices are on.

 

The batteries were on the boat when i purchased it and i have no idea how old they are, but i do know being ex hire boat the chances of them being looked after is very slim!

 

I have 3 x 110amp in place, but plan to move the starter out a little and replace with 4 x 110amp.

 

I need to think about charging also so was thinking about picking up one of the below to fit at the same time as the full 240v system.

 

I guess really all i am looking for is to understand what these do, can i just set it up and walk away, and where does it have to be fitted in terms of distance from the battery bank?

 

http://www.seamarknunn.com/acatalog/pro-charge-ultra-40amp-4929.html?gclid=CjwKEAiApYGyBRC-g_jIstuduV8SJABCEzhZaY5mDJT8PN_zFkRSgdnKZ_zVCNOEO9jYUYaw7FhYpBoC4CHw_wcB#.VkCLh9LhBpg

 

 

Thanks

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Hi, the charger needs to be mounted in a dry and well ventilated space ideally within 2 metres of the batteries.

 

Once correctly installed and set up it can be left connected to keep the batteries in good condition.

 

Cheers

Roger

 

edited for fumble fingers

Edited by Roger Crown
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Its a three output mult-stage mains charger. Like all chargers it needs to be located close to the batteries in ventilated area.

 

Once the output voltage is set to match batteries its fit and forget. I believe this model like other Sterling chargers, has an auto quasi equalise charge mode every 14 days or so. This puts it back in absorb mode for an hour or so before dropping back to float, which benefits batteries by offsetting any slight sulphation that may have formed on plates during prolonged time in float, as well as stirring up the electrolyte which may have stratisfied for the same reason.

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I fitted that model charger last year and it seems to be doing a good job so far. Quite easy to install and set up.

 

The manual is available on-line at the link below which will give you all the info you need on cable size and length:

 

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0658/7343/files/full_cec_instruction_1.pdf?14012422295855460459

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the charger needs to be mounted in a dry and well ventilated space ideally within 2 metres of the batteries.

 

Guessing this does not include in the boat cabin?

 

How about in the engine bay?

 

That's where mine are under the well ventilated floor area of trad engine room. TBH its not that critical as it has multi-speed fan cooling, just avoid sealed cupboards. Not sure why the boat cabin wouldn't work unless you wanted to site it above the stove.

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Cruiser stern engine 'ole will be too prone to damp and condensation, go for the rear bulkhead inside the boat.

Phil

As above, then you can also see whats going on with with the charger without lifting the rear deck boards.

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Id depends on your use - but if you're in marina most of the time and you have 240v connected all of the time, then I suggest you don't need a great big charger. All a higher output charger will do is charge the batteries quicker - and sit twiddling its thumbs for the rest of the day and night (as it were).

 

Most batteries 'prefer' a charge it slow regime and that can gives a longer battery life (of course that also depends on how fast you discharge them) - methinks I'd find the model that gave me the best 'bang for mu buck'. The 30 amp version is available for around £260, whereas the 40 amp-er is around £320

If you only use your 'leccy frugally then the 20 amp version might be good enough.

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Id depends on your use - but if you're in marina most of the time and you have 240v connected all of the time, then I suggest you don't need a great big charger. All a higher output charger will do is charge the batteries quicker - and sit twiddling its thumbs for the rest of the day and night (as it were).

 

Most batteries 'prefer' a charge it slow regime and that can gives a longer battery life (of course that also depends on how fast you discharge them) - methinks I'd find the model that gave me the best 'bang for mu buck'. The 30 amp version is available for around £260, whereas the 40 amp-er is around £320

If you only use your 'leccy frugally then the 20 amp version might be good enough.

I would suggest that even 10 amps is more than enough to maintain batteries, lets face it that would give you 240Ah per day if left connected all the time. If you need to recharge batteries its a different matter.

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I have a Numax connect and forget charger that is left on .

I have just replaced my leisure bank and it sits on float charge pretty much most of.the time.

My old batteries would never go above 75% irrespective of how long I had the charger connected.

Edited by Rickent
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I have a Numax connect and forget charger that is left on .

I have just replaced my leisure bank and it sits on float charge pretty much most of.the time.

My old batteries would never go above 75% irrespective of how long I had the charger connected.

 

What is 75%?

 

How were you reading/knowing this?

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The charger has an indicator of s o c 25 50 75 and 100 ,once it reaches 100% it then indicates float charge.

I have no idea how accurate this is but as i said my old batteries would never go above 75%.

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  • 1 month later...

When charging old ie damaged batteries the voltage tends to increase fast, but they fail to hold much charge. Once disconnected from the charger the voltage then falls away, and under load the voltage falls even more. The basic % charge indicators tend to simply measure the voltage at the time, and don't take any thing else into account. So they are not very reliable. It is not easy to get an accurate assessment of % charge without measuring the specific gravity of the battery acid. I have an off grid cabin with solar charging for 12v batteries, and my first battery suffered from my lack of knowledge and understanding about proper charging (ie don't under or overcharge them). Get a good charge controller!

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When charging old ie damaged batteries the voltage tends to increase fast, but they fail to hold much charge. Once disconnected from the charger the voltage then falls away, and under load the voltage falls even more. The basic % charge indicators tend to simply measure the voltage at the time, and don't take any thing else into account. So they are not very reliable. It is not easy to get an accurate assessment of % charge without measuring the specific gravity of the battery acid. I have an off grid cabin with solar charging for 12v batteries, and my first battery suffered from my lack of knowledge and understanding about proper charging (ie don't under or overcharge them). Get a good charge controller!

 

 

Boys?

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Boys?

He describes knackered batteries accurately (sod all capacity) and suggests that you should use decent chargers. I agree.

 

Specific Gravity isn't the only way to check charge status though.

 

As discussed many times in other threads, when charging, the tail current will show when you're approaching 100%. This is probably the easiest way to know when the batteries are fully charged.

 

Off-load rested voltage measurements will tell you the SoC of any bank but that's difficult to achieve accurately in real world situations.

 

SmartGauge will give you a highly accurate reading of the state of charge when on-load or resting, and will be within 10% when charging. It's without doubt the most comprehensive tool for knowing the bank's SoC but doesn't tell you everything about the health of the batteries without some deduction, common sense, and tail current measurements (it's not designed to).

 

That what you were after?

 

Tony

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He describes knackered batteries accurately (sod all capacity) and suggests that you should use decent chargers. I agree.

 

Specific Gravity isn't the only way to check charge status though.

 

As discussed many times in other threads, when charging, the tail current will show when you're approaching 100%. This is probably the easiest way to know when the batteries are fully charged.

 

Off-load rested voltage measurements will tell you the SoC of any bank but that's difficult to achieve accurately in real world situations.

 

SmartGauge will give you a highly accurate reading of the state of charge when on-load or resting, and will be within 10% when charging. It's without doubt the most comprehensive tool for knowing the bank's SoC but doesn't tell you everything about the health of the batteries without some deduction, common sense, and tail current measurements (it's not designed to).

 

That what you were after?

 

Tony

 

Yep ta. I was a bit too wobbly to type all that last night!

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Electroquest 30amp charger or ditto Numax, inexpensive fit and forget

Phil

 

Don't know about Numax, but I'd strongly recommend people to steer clear of Electroquest.

 

30A charger, produced a maximum of 12.8V and 6A. Took 3 months and 30+ phone calls to get a refund. There's two guys (allegedly) and it was always "the other fellow handles this bit, he'll call you back".

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