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Liveaboard tools


Daltonia

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Hello, I'd appreciate advice on what tools should be on board for the basic day-to-day maintenance of a liveaboard narrowboat. I have a decent multi-meter, but otherwise will be buying everything new. For standard tools I intend to purchase from the Halford Professional series, since I understand these are good quality but not the eye-watering prices that can be paid for the likes of Snap On. The boat, not bought yet, will be new or newish, so hopefully no need for imperial items. Many thanks for any with deciding what to buy. biggrin.png

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That really is a "how long is a piece of string" question.....however I would say that restricting yourself to one source of supply might be unwise, there are very good deals on good quality tools from the likes of ToolStation, Screwfix and umpteen other tool shops, my suggestion would be shop around

 

 

edit for fat finger.

Edited by John V
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A mains powered (or battery if you're flush) multitool, e.g. from Bosch -

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-PMF-190-Multifunctional-Allrounder/dp/B0091GDVZK

 

The most useful tool I have on the boat, for general fitting out and DIY jobs. Flush cuts, plunging cuts, sanding, removing old tile grout, cutting neat access hatches.......

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I personally wouldn't go out and buy a full set of top quality tools, but buy individual quality tools for when needed. A full set of quality spanners may cost XXXX, but you'll only end up using around 3. So it's better to spend the money on the 3 rather than the 20 or so. Same with socket sets. In addition, you may find you need 2 of the same size for nuts and bolts!

 

So a list of things that you'll need tools for on the boat may be more valuable to you so you can get these tools...

 

WD40 - always useful!

 

Weedhatch.

Make sure can get on/off. - A 4lb nice hammer is useful, but some may be bolted down.

Tools to clear the prop.

 

Mooring stakes.

Nice hammer.

Long lever to remove those stakes that you whacked in too much!

 

Engine Service

Oil filter removal tool.

Spanners/sockets to tighten/remove belts.

Also look at size of bolts for gearbox connections for throttle/gear cables as these may need tightening up.

And the size of the bolts for the engine mounts.

 

Stern gland and gearbox/shaft "mount". - Again the bolt size.

 

Hoses.

Boats like hoses, from filling with water to connecting the engine to the skin tank. It's nice to have spare hose clamps as you'll no doubt find if you need to remove one it will be a cheap and nasty one and all the thread will have gone due to been over tightened at one time. Correct size screw driver to remove hose clamps, spare tap to hozelock type connectors (as you'll leave them on the tap and forget!).

Edited by Robbo
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A mains powered (or battery if you're flush) multitool, e.g. from Bosch -

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-PMF-190-Multifunctional-Allrounder/dp/B0091GDVZK

 

The most useful tool I have on the boat, for general fitting out and DIY jobs. Flush cuts, plunging cuts, sanding, removing old tile grout, cutting neat access hatches.......

I very much agree.

That's how it starts and before you know it, you have a 72' butty as a workshop..... ;)

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I go with Bagdad. I have every tool I'll ever need.......Untill the next job.

 

As others have said don't go for one supplyer. (the tools sold by the firm you mentioned are 'good enough') Other firms exist and are atleast as good and cost less.

 

A good start is a pair of quality,read expensive, adjustable spanners. Your hopes about not needing A/F spaners may not be met.

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That really is a "how long is a piece of string" question.....however I would say that restricting yourself to one source of supply might be unwise, there are very good deals on good quality tools from the likes of ToolStation, Screwfix and umpteen other tool shops, my suggestion would be shop around

 

 

That's where I'd be starting my purchases. Halfrauds is far too expensive.

In Germany an adjustable spanner is known as an "Englishman".

 

My friend who moved to Austria tells me they don't have compression fittings! Struck me as a bit odd - and possibly a business opportunity!

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An adjustable spanner is a tool which will fit a variety of nuts and bolts equally badly. An expensive adjustable spanner is...... icecream.gif

As an aprentice out 'Master' refered to these tools as Nut F*ckers and called a hammer Percussious Goon but things have moved on and some of the high end spaners are good. Anyway if you can patch it to get you back under way replace the muched nut later.

 

That said there is nothing like having the right tool for the job.

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When we were buying our boat, I was aiming to buy a tool kit like the OP.

Before I did, my 83 year old dad found in his garage a great professional tool kit that he bought when he had his sea-going boat. This saved us a fortune, and is a bigger and way better set than I was likely to buy.

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Sockets, MOLE GRIPS, Adjustable spanner, spanner set and screwdrivers are a good start!

cordless drill (fair to good brands on all tools or your just cheating yourself)

Sealer gun and silicone, matches, blowtorch, decent torch and/or lantern, hurricane lamp

electricians knife, shrink wrap, gas or mains solder iron and MULTIMETER, Electricians tape, wago snap connectors and so on!

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/WAGO-spring-lever-push-fit-reuseable-cable-2-wire-3-wire-5-wire-connectors-32A-/111340750667?var=&hash=item19ec6d074b:m:muJW12l83Y37ad3MuRpXlGg

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A roll of self amalgamating tape can be useful for many things, including temporary repairs on hoses.

Cable ties are a very useful thing to have aboard. I always have some reusable ones for which I find several uses.

Duct tape is good stuff to have.

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