Jump to content

earning a living


kevin marks
 Share

Featured Posts

Might I suggest that you also look at your venture from the other end? By that I mean work out your cost of living on a boat at a standard of living that you're happy to accept. Factor in all of the annual mandatory costs of keeping a boat without coming into conflict with CRT (much of which can be found by searching here or by basic Googling), add something for fuel, maintenance and sundries, and add to that your own wants and needs, etc. Once you have that total, then you can look at the business model to see if it can raise that amount reliably.

 

Good luck with following your dream! smile.png

And always at least double the first number you thought of when it comes to costs!

I think im right in saying that with a traders license im allowed to set up on the towpath as long as I don't cause an obstruction,am I correct ?

Check very carefully with the relevant team at CaRT and do not plan on pushing the boundaries. At some point you will need their goodwill. (I suspect you will find that it is a bit more than just not causing an obstruction eg restricted moorings)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are several floating traders of one kind or another. Cheese boats, Hairdresser and books to name a few. I have not come across a dry tea or coffee seller but that is not to say it isn't an idea you could make a success of.

 

As you have identified it is not going to make anyone rich as a sole trader from a boat and I have no idea if you could make enough to fully finance yourself and your boat but people do trade from their boats and do make some money.

 

I wonder how you would get yourself re-supplied if you are moving about? Will that make life difficult? It must be possible though.

 

Good luck to you if you decide to go ahead. I will try and make a point of being a customer if we see you about.

There are already 2 boats selling coffee (one being us) 2 cheese boats and a boat who sells barista style coffee. I often get asked for loose leaf tea. ..not my forte so there is an opening there. Good luck it's not easy and you will never be able to retire to a south sea island on the proceeds. Oh and be prepared for someone who can't think for themselves to steal your idea and copy you. You just have to be better that's all and stay ahead of the game.

 

Edited to add as I have corrected by OH there are 3 boats already selling ground and beans

Edited by tillergirl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen one boat stop, put out some foldup tables and chairs, and serve from the hatch...I'd imagine if you did that, and provided cake with the tea, and found the right location on weekends, you might make enough to survive the week...;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen one boat stop, put out some foldup tables and chairs, and serve from the hatch...I'd imagine if you did that, and provided cake with the tea, and found the right location on weekends, you might make enough to survive the week...;-)

im not going to be selling wet tea as in a mug but dry tea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi everyone

im kevin and im wanting to buy a narrowboat with the view to living aboard and selling tea loose leaf and bags as a way of earning some money.I realise im not going to earn a fortune and that's not the idea the idea is just to earn enough to sustain a life afloat.Any comments would be appreciated negative or positive as to whether or not my idea is realistic

many thanks

Hi Kevin.

 

When I was a lad (a loooong time ago) I worked in the print dep't of the TBA. I used to by tea from them and sell it on.

Didn't make a fortune but got enough to buy my first car.

 

IMHO if you try to work everything out to the eighth degree, you would never try anything.

 

Can't see why you shouldn't give it a go. If it doesn't work out after a year or so, at least you won't be thinking....I wonder???

And you will still have a boat and a nice lifestyle....maybe try something else.

 

Bet of luck. Rob....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen one boat stop, put out some foldup tables and chairs, and serve from the hatch...I'd imagine if you did that, and provided cake with the tea, and found the right location on weekends, you might make enough to survive the week...;-)

One meter square for an advertising board is all that is allowed so these people are breaking their t&c's of their licence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tea is very delcate and will absorb any strong oders from soap to oil. If you can rent out your house then you will have an income stream When we visited Prague the tea cellers there where places to go and chill, up to 50 teas on offer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tea is very delcate and will absorb any strong oders from soap to oil. If you can rent out your house then you will have an income stream When we visited Prague the tea cellers there where places to go and chill, up to 50 teas on offer

I understand tea absorbs strong odours that's why i'll store it in air tight plastic containers.im afraid my idea is not to create a place for people to come and chill, its purely a business

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

What are CRT providing over and above the existing license if a boater were to sell items from their roof for example to justify the fee?

Best part of £1000 then, or £900 if you pay promptly

 

£20 per week doesn't sound too bad if you consider how much business rates might be. How many pounds of tea is that?

I could feed myself on £20 a week or less for that matter!

 

Richard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On a canal, CaRT own the water, maybe the bank maybe not the bank (canal bank!) You pay a licence to use the water within their T&Cs and then you may have to pay the owner of the waterside for the right to trade there. Your favoured place(s) may or may not be owned by CaRT, and covered by a recreational or trader's licence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think the Roving Trader licence is much more expensive than std. Just under £1k for leisure, just over 1k for Roving Trader for a 60ft. This is the no public on board, just an A board on the towpath, no stock over one ton, no hazardous etc. I was looking into the costs and it doesn't seem prohibitive if the business model works. Dismissing the internet option is folly imho. Many of the well done businesses engage with their customers via the web. Even if it is only a blog mentioning new stock lines or a cruising itinerary so they can arrange to come and buy. A good example I've seen on the canal and online would be www.thewoolboat.co.uk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Permission to use their 'premises' to run a business.

the roof of my boat is not their premises lots of people sell items from their boats and CRT turn a blind eye as frankly there is jack they can do about it!

On a canal, CaRT own the water, maybe the bank maybe not the bank (canal bank!) You pay a licence to use the water within their T&Cs and then you may have to pay the owner of the waterside for the right to trade there. Your favoured place(s) may or may not be owned by CaRT, and covered by a recreational or trader's licence.

i think it would really depend on what goods or services you are selling.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.