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Stephen Sugg

Jam 'Ole Run

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there's been a lot about this in WW over the last couple of months about the way that they run this thing, I've never seen it myself but I was wondering if anyone saw it and were they "taking liberties" or is it just a couple of the New Boat brigade getting upset because their boats brushed up against the bank?

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there's been a lot about this in WW over the last couple of months about the way that they run this thing, I've never seen it myself but I was wondering if anyone saw it and were they "taking liberties" or is it just a couple of the New Boat brigade getting upset because their boats brushed up against the bank?

 

We were at Stoke Bruerne on 23rd October last year and got up early to see the specatacle. The weather was damp and miserable and we were slightly dissapointed at the small number of ex-working boats participating - at least half of the boats had full length cabins just like 99% of the other boats on the cut these days. The working pairs that were involved were empty and tightly coupled which presented a very different spectacle to the way I remember seeing them (loaded to the gunwhales and hauling the butty on a long line) carrying small coal to Kearley and Tongue's factory.

 

There is a brief report and a couple of photographs on our website here.

 

Certainly we saw no evidence of 'taking liberties' - we just felt that from a heritage point of view, it would be nice if such an event could be staged authentically and advertised in the same way as heritage railways put on historical galas - I realise that it costs a lot of money to load boats with coal these days but if such a thing could be done and if it were done authentically - it may be possible to advertise the event and get sponsorship.

 

Having said all that, Jane and I were pleased to see the event - those taking part worked extremely hard to do what they did (working boats for such long hours at a commercial speed in such foul weather is no picnic!) and the team responsible are to be commended and encouraged.

Edited by NB Alnwick

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we just felt that from a heritage point of view, it would be nice if such an event could be staged authentically and advertised in the same way as heritage railways put on historical galas - I realise that it costs a lot of money to load boats with coal these days but if such a thing could be done and if it were done authentically - it may be possible to advertise the event and get sponsorship.

Apparently the Raymond Trust aren't allowed to load their boats, even for demonstration purposes because it would affect their charitable status.

 

They have had quite a few offers from various coal merchants (even one which was a round trip loading and unloading in the same place so it couldn't be construed as a delivery) but none satisfied the terms of their charity registration.

 

Because other workboat charities don't seem to suffer from this ridiculous constraint, I can only assume that, when the Trust was set up, the committee knew as much about charitable status as they did about boat restoration.

 

I still live in hope that one day Lucy will take part in the run, towed by either Usk or Ian.

Edited by carlt

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They came past me early in the morning on the way down and caused hardly a ripple. Lily was loaded with about 15 tons of Andy's assorted paraphenalia - elm planks, a couple of engines, a large tank of diesel and so on, so it sat well in the water - plus it gave the Bolinder something to get its teeth into. Meeting that coming the other way, you wouldn't have any choice but to head for the bank, it must have been drawing getting on for 3ft....

Shame it's over but as with so many things, I guess it was fun while it lasted.

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Why is it over?

 

Chris Coghlan felt that the Old working boatmen who were still around are now not able to participate in the run , this was the reason I have heard ( please correct me if I am wrong )

I did hear a rumour that NBOC may take the mantle up next year BUT i am not sure??

We would have liked to taken Baldock ( even with the full length cabin) but as always time/work got in the way

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Chris Coghlan felt that the Old working boatmen who were still around are now not able to participate in the run , this was the reason I have heard ( please correct me if I am wrong )

I did hear a rumour that NBOC may take the mantle up next year BUT i am not sure??

We would have liked to taken Baldock ( even with the full length cabin) but as always time/work got in the way

Tim Coghlan doesn't own the jam 'ole run. He collects a variety of boats, some working, some leisure and does a 're-enactment' with no official recognition or authority.

 

He has decided that HE will not participate in any future runs, he has no right to say there won't be any.

 

If I decide to give the owner of Ian a ring and see if he fancies towing Lucy, ask the Roger trust if they're interested and ask a few of my ex-working boatmen friends (who seem remarkably sprightly compared to me), then we would have as many of the original Jam 'ole boats as Tim could ever muster and we could call it the Jam 'ole run.

 

I imagine the Raymond Trust would still be interested as well.

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We were at Stoke Bruerne on 23rd October last year and got up early to see the specatacle. The weather was damp and miserable and we were slightly dissapointed at the small number of ex-working boats participating - at least half of the boats had full length cabins just like 99% of the other boats on the cut these days. The working pairs that were involved were empty and tightly coupled which presented a very different spectacle to the way I remember seeing them (loaded to the gunwhales and hauling the butty on a long line) carrying small coal to Kearley and Tongue's factory.

I am a bit confused as to why you were disapointed about the re-enacted Jam 'ole run. I knew all the Blue Line crews who operated this run in the 1960's and there were only three pairs, so three pairs would be correct. Furthermore they rarely operated together, there usually being at least one day between each of them. Also the boats rarely (if ever) had a return payload so they always ran light on the north bound return run.

 

From recollection none of the pairs operated in the same fashion, Jim and Doris Collins tended to work on a fairly short short snubber, Rose and Arthur Bray on a long line (Ernie almost always steeered the motor), and Rose Whitlock, and Laura Carter (Bill Whitlock was rarely permitted to steer!!) ran a line through running blocks. All three pairs ran breasted up where the width of the canal, and the absence of sharp bends permitted it.

Edited by David Schweizer

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I am a bit confused as to why you were disapointed about the re-enacted Jam 'ole run. I knew all the Blue Line crews who operated this run in the 1960's and there were only three pairs, so three pairs would be correct. Furthermore they rarely operated together, there usually being at least one day between each of them. Also the boats rarely (if ever) had a return payload so they always ran light on the north bound return run.

 

From recollection none of the pairs operated in the same fashion, Jim and Doris Collins tended to work on a fairly short short snubber, Rose and Arthur Bray on a long line (Ernie almost always steeered the motor), and Rose Whitlock, and Laura Carter (Bill Whitlock was rarely permitted to steer!!) ran a line through running blocks. All three pairs ran breasted up where the width of the canal, and the absence of sharp bends permitted it.

 

I am not sure what we expected but to me a 're-creation' is exactly that and loaded boats (heading south) would have been nice to see.

 

Also I can't remember any of them wearing bright orange jackets in the 1960s!

Edited by NB Alnwick

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Tim Coghlan doesn't own the jam 'ole run. He collects a variety of boats, some working, some leisure and does a 're-enactment' with no official recognition or authority.

 

He has decided that HE will not participate in any future runs, he has no right to say there won't be any.

 

If I decide to give the owner of Ian a ring and see if he fancies towing Lucy, ask the Roger trust if they're interested and ask a few of my ex-working boatmen friends (who seem remarkably sprightly compared to me), then we would have as many of the original Jam 'ole boats as Tim could ever muster and we could call it the Jam 'ole run.

 

I imagine the Raymond Trust would still be interested as well.

 

Is it Tim or Chris? Anyway, one of the Coglans is listed in my TV guide this week as a "boat broker" for the Waterworld rubbish, he's getting famous!

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Is it Tim or Chris? Anyway, one of the Coglans is listed in my TV guide this week as a "boat broker" for the Waterworld rubbish, he's getting famous!

Tim Goghlan, Chris Coburn, not much to choose between them for self promotion.

 

:lol:

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They came past me early in the morning on the way down and caused hardly a ripple. Lily was loaded with about 15 tons of Andy's assorted paraphenalia - elm planks, a couple of engines, a large tank of diesel and so on, so it sat well in the water - plus it gave the Bolinder something to get its teeth into. Meeting that coming the other way, you wouldn't have any choice but to head for the bank, it must have been drawing getting on for 3ft....

Shame it's over but as with so many things, I guess it was fun while it lasted.

I would say it was loaded more realistically with 7-8 tons it its was loaded with 15 tons it would have a lot less freeboard than i remember seeing

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Alnwick was surprised that the pairs on the jam 'ole run were on cross straps. Try towing a butty on a long line nowadays and see just how much grief that involves. Modern boaters do not understand the need to keep away from the line or to give room on turns.Cross straps enable the motor steerer to closely control the fore end of the butty and the butty steerer to push the back end of the motor around tight turns and out of the way of other boats when they panic. regards, H.C.

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Can understand it in a rally enviroment (pictures a pair long lining though branston) but it quite possable to longline on the canals, including busyer areas, such as the llangolen in early august.

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... such as the llangolen in early august.

 

I'd love to see someone do that round the junction at Trevor in early August, with the trip boat heading in the opposite direction - wouldn't like to see their insurance premium afterwards though!

 

You could quite happily long line on the upper Llan Daniel... as it's so narrow you wouldn't have to worry about traffic!

 

When it's your home and your livelyhood you do things in a safe and efficient manner. 99% of the time (nowadays) that means running on cross straps when singled-out.

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Where exactly was the Jam'Ole. I did the Bulls Bridge to Paddington run recently and despite watching out for it I couldnt make it out. I know the arm was filled in and the factory flattened. Is there a plaque or some kind of memorial there now?

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When it's your home and your livelyhood you do things in a safe and efficient manner. 99% of the time (nowadays) that means running on cross straps when singled-out.

 

Was mostly only loaded boats that ran on a long line.......I've yet to see a deeply loaded hotel pair...... ;)

 

 

 

Two of my great-grandparents.....my mother's mother's parents worked at the Jam'ole....

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When it's your home and your livelyhood you do things in a safe and efficient manner. 99% of the time (nowadays) that means running on cross straps when singled-out.

IM sure, and as neil says i imagine you butty is relativly lightly loaded?

 

At the time my freinds butty was loaded more heavly than usual for that trip, partly to allow her to fit under the harecastle, which made long(ish) lining the best option.

 

 

Daniel

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