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seadog42uk

Cleaning the glass in the stove door

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Can anyone offer any tips with regard to cleaning the glass on the stove door? This one looks like it has never been cleaned.

 

Regards,

 

Stuart

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If heavily stained, vigorous rubbing with a moistened Brillo pad.

For lighter staining, wipe with a Jay Cloth soaked in water and vinegar.

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Hi,

 

I've tried many things. I find that a small paint scraper - the sort that holds a Stanley knife blade is effective. Be careful around the edges where the glass seal is. It is also possible to buy a scraper for the insides of fish tanks.

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I use two methods.

 

One ....I remove glass and coat both sides with oven cleaner usually cleaneeze and leave for a couple of hours and wash off. You will find you are still left with some burnt on spots. Recoat with oven cleaner, then scrape glass clear with a razor blade. Re wash should be cleanish.

Two... I use a steam cleaner, a normal hand held one. Usually shifts most of the grot. This is what the professionals use when doing home oven cleaning.

Three... Get a professional to visit and do the whole appliance, treat yourself they really do come up looking like new. I've seen one visit a boat in Selby boat centre. I'm sure others will come out wherever you are.

 

Note some glass is edged in black paint, the cleaners and steam are safe, razor blades need a steady hand. PLEASE DONT USE BRILLO PADS. Causes minor scratches to the glass which are cumulative.

Edited by larkshall

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Depends on how serious the deposits are, but always worth trying damp newspaper -- preferably a tabloid with lots of black ink.

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. PLEASE DONT USE BRILLO PADS. Causes minor scratches to the glass which are cumulative.

I've used them occasionally on our Clearview at home for ten years and there is no visible damage.

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I've used them occasionally on our Clearview at home for ten years and there is no visible damage.

There will be use magnifying glass to see. But I'd agree ok on occasion if used carefully. The razor blade or scraper is better and quicker btw

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There will be use magnifying glass to see. But I'd agree ok on occasion if used carefully. The razor blade or scraper is better and quicker btw

I take your point, but neither we nor our house visitors are in the habit of examining the stove door with a magnifying glass. I use a Brillo pad "occasionally" because it's only needed when there's a thick build-up of clag - as the OP has at present. For lighter deposits, vinegar and water do the trick - indeed, if I do it every day, just a damp cloth removes most of the dirt apart from a few stubborn bits in the corners.

 

Also, most people have Brillo, or other brand, pads at home, whereas nowadays not many have the traditional safety razor blades to hand - and they are surprisingly expensive to buy..

  • Greenie 1

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I take your point, but neither we nor our house visitors are in the habit of examining the stove door with a magnifying glass. I use a Brillo pad "occasionally" because it's only needed when there's a thick build-up of clag - as the OP has at present. For lighter deposits, vinegar and water do the trick - indeed, if I do it every day, just a damp cloth removes most of the dirt apart from a few stubborn bits in the corners.

 

Also, most people have Brillo, or other brand, pads at home, whereas nowadays not many have the traditional safety razor blades to hand - and they are surprisingly expensive to buy..

Agreed I use a Stanley knife blade, it's cheapest, I get em in the pound shop, unless I happen to pass a wholesaler. I also agree about vinegar and water, on a weekly basis. Don't use cooker daily. LOL

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When I had a coal stove I used a green plastic scouring pad dipped in dilute washing up liquid for heavier stains, and a dry newspaper rubbed on the glass daily used to keep it mainly clean.

 

Now have a drip feed diesel boiler and the "glass" is easily cleaned with a microfibre cloth.

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Depends on how serious the deposits are, but always worth trying damp newspaper -- preferably a tabloid with lots of black ink.

If you dab said damp news paper into the ash pan before the cleaning attempt it's more than likely will do a better job.

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not helpful at this time of year but running the stove hot for a few minutes clears the glass in my experience.

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If you dab said damp news paper into the ash pan before the cleaning attempt it's more than likely will do a better job.

I was told this by someone, my sister says it works, never tried it myself but i will one day

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I was told this by someone, my sister says it works, never tried it myself but i will one day

Well, ash is abrasive, as is soot. My Mum told me that her parents' generation used to use soot to clean their teeth with, though it may have been April 1st when she told me this.

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Well, ash is abrasive, as is soot. My Mum told me that her parents' generation used to use soot to clean their teeth with, though it may have been April 1st when she told me this.

Fluoride.

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Depends on how serious the deposits are, but always worth trying damp newspaper -- preferably a tabloid with lots of black ink.

Surely the tabloids have more red ink!

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Some wood ash mixed with vinegar brings mine up a treat.

Apply and buff off with newspaper.

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Is it just me who likes watching the fire through mucky glass?

 

I find the softened abstract movement of the flames when the fires running hot and the shifting diffused glow as the fire runs low very comforting.

 

I use the air wash to 'freshen up' the glass occasionaly and clean 'properly' when inspecting door seals etc ( Wood ash & vinigar on newspaper ) but don't need to see what every log of lump of coal is up to.

 

I'm also lazy.

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