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umpire111

API CC Oil- what is compatible?

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have a boat with n Isuzu 33hp ILB engine, 11 years old. The manual specifies that I should used mineralised oil, 15w/40 API CC oil. Have just had a service and the engineer has put in Pennasol Oil, 15W/40 but with a API SI/CF spec. When questioned he said that he uses this oil in all boats and to ignore the manual as it is out of date.

 

can someone please advise, is this going to be ok and what issues are there?

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Sounds like your engineer is correct although wouldn't recommend this oil in vintage diesel that doesn't have in-line filtration - they need low or non-detergent oil, example - API CC spec.

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But surely the fact that a particular oil has both API S and C spec confirms its suitability in either petrol or diesel engines.

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He is right and wrong at the same time. CC grade oils are the norm for many of the older engine types still found in narrowboats, particularly those with no oil filtration or rudimentary or bypass systems. It isn't used in modern engines. Specialist suppliers like Morris Oils still manufacture CC grades so it is easily obtainable and should be used if at all possible.CC is a non / low detergent oil.

 

CF grades are also obsolete but more common and were the common user oils in many cars up to the early 90's. They are readily available. If your Isuzu has a full flow oil filter a CF oil is fine. if it hasn't don't use it

 

CF oils are slightly more detergent and are designed to carry the combustion products in the oil to be taken out by the filter. In engines without filters etc CC oils enable to combustion products to settle out and fall into the crankcase.

 

Using a CF won't kill your engine but the best advice is always to stick with what the manufacturer recommends.

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Sounds like your engineer is correct although wouldn't recommend this oil in vintage diesel that doesn't have in-line filtration - they need low or non-detergent oil, example - API CC spec.

 

I'm using the same oil in a Lister ST3, does that have in-filtration?

 

The manual says that CD can be used in it except when running in.

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Has your ST3 got an external oil filter? If it has the CD oil is fine. CD grades are very low detergent oils anyway. The guidance that CD should not be used when running in is because the detergency has a mild scouring effect which is not ideal as you want the metal particles worn off during running in to fall into the crankcase not be carried round and round the engine.

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Has your ST3 got an external oil filter? If it has the CD oil is fine. CD grades are very low detergent oils anyway. The guidance that CD should not be used when running in is because the detergency has a mild scouring effect which is not ideal as you want the metal particles worn off during running in to fall into the crankcase not be carried round and round the engine.

 

Yes. It's got an spin on filter. It's CF oil I'm using in it, the same as the OP's

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Full flow filter then so the combustion products will get filtered out. Should be OK providing that the engine isn't worn too much. Scouring the sludge out is not always a good thing. But , as I have said on this forum many times, as has Martyn, the best advice is to stick with what the manufacturer recommended in the first place.

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For the price of it I'm tempted to consider the oil as a flush. Go boating for a day, change the oil for CC and change the filter.

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For the price of it I'm tempted to consider the oil as a flush. Go boating for a day, change the oil for CC and change the filter.

 

And I, on the other hand would not entertain flushing ANY engine.

 

I have had the aftermarth of a flush to deal with on several occasions, granted, they were neglected motors to begin with - but flushing addatives have a habit of flushing deposits that have built up out of harms way directly to the oil strainer. The worse one being a Mk 2 2.8 Granada that someone decided would benefit from the shite shiffting from the heads to the oil strainer!

 

You only need to carry out regular changes with good quilty oil, none of my motors by they car, bike, van or boat have ever had flusing additives thru them, nor have I done it to the multidue amounts of plant and other peoples vehicles I have looked after. None have had oil pressure problems or engine failure :)

Sorry Sabcatt, read that correctly a second time. Fully agree with you blush.png

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