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Narrowboats at sea.


Jerra
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I was down at Whitehaven Harbour today and there in the middle of all boats designed for lumpy water was a 70 foot narrow boat.

 

The harbour is fine as there are lock gates and pontoons so it is easy to get on the boats and the water is always calm.

 

The nearest opening from a canal to make a sea trip to Whitehaven is I think Glasson Dock. That seems to me a long sea passage given the "fetch" the waves have up the Irish Sea with the prevailing SW wind.

 

Do the knowledgeable members think the boat has made this trip or has it been craned in possibly as a liveaboard do you think?

 

I didn't have time to get a close look to see if there were any modifications (even temporary ones) like boards across the front doors.

 

What is the general opinion?

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I was down at Whitehaven Harbour today and there in the middle of all boats designed for lumpy water was a 70 foot narrow boat.

 

The harbour is fine as there are lock gates and pontoons so it is easy to get on the boats and the water is always calm.

 

The nearest opening from a canal to make a sea trip to Whitehaven is I think Glasson Dock. That seems to me a long sea passage given the "fetch" the waves have up the Irish Sea with the prevailing SW wind.

 

Do the knowledgeable members think the boat has made this trip or has it been craned in possibly as a liveaboard do you think?

 

I didn't have time to get a close look to see if there were any modifications (even temporary ones) like boards across the front doors.

 

What is the general opinion?

 

I'll let you know after crossing the Wash (I hope) on 23rd May - I think that counts as the sea?

 

Here is my weather board ....

 

 

dscf5028.jpg

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Have never really understood why people take narrowboats to coastal marinas.

 

The moorings are still charged per foot/metre and you can get many boats better suited to the environment and the waters that will cost far less to moor and offer far better living accommodation.

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Was it Wyvern shipping company's "Ocean Princess" that's a sea going narrowboat.

Yes, and Chris Coburn's "Progress" (with a little help from Laurence Hogg of this parish.

 

Terry Darlington took his narrowboat across the channel and up to the Mediterranean. He also took it across the Atlantic, but that time it was in a container!

  • Greenie 1
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Up the river hamble, in Southampton theirs 4/ 5 in the marina that have moorings by the Aladdins cave marina.

And apparently theirs at least 2 that move.

 

 

Col

 

...... to the bottom and back?

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Up the river hamble, in Southampton theirs 4/ 5 in the marina that have moorings by the Aladdins cave marina.

And apparently theirs at least 2 that move.

Col

Not a narrowboat but you can easily see a canal wideboat moored as you cross the Hamble on the M27 bridge.

...... to the bottom and back?

Certainly seen the wideboat sitting on the mud. Edited by pearley
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Not a narrowboat but you can easily see a canal wideboat moored as you cross the Hamble on the M27 bridge.

Certainly seen the wideboat sitting on the mud.

That's the place, there are residential council taxed up the top 2/3 barges further up, one is for sale, with the mooring right up the top, nice community apparently

 

But the narrow boats are in the marina which is seen from the m27, where the old chandlers are lovely place with lots of boatyard things.

I found there business card chandlery barge. At the time ask for a price for mine

It is £479.15 per month for 57ft barge, Residential price.

Of course you wouldn't need a licence

And 2 of them at least has done the Isle of Wight

 

Col

Edited by bigcol
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From all I've read on various topics, it seems that people venture into tidal waters all the time in narrowboats (Thames, Severn, Trent/Humber, Ribble Link), and are pretty safe provided that they've done the right preparation and go at the right time.

 

No doubt there are various things that can be done to improve the odds of survival when taking such an unsuitable vessel out onto the open sea, and Terry Darlington's book describes some of them. As I remember it, his biggest problem was the current running along the French coast, and consequently doing the turn into Calais harbour without being pushed into the harbour wall at the entrance.

 

Having the patience to wait for a really good weather forecast must be important, because if the sea is very calm and the forecast says it'll stay that way for long enough to reach the next safe harbour, that's got to be the day to go.

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From all I've read on various topics, it seems that people venture into tidal waters all the time in narrowboats (Thames, Severn, Trent/Humber, Ribble Link), and are pretty safe provided that they've done the right preparation and go at the right time.

 

No doubt there are various things that can be done to improve the odds of survival when taking such an unsuitable vessel out onto the open sea, and Terry Darlington's book describes some of them. As I remember it, his biggest problem was the current running along the French coast, and consequently doing the turn into Calais harbour without being pushed into the harbour wall at the entrance.

 

Having the patience to wait for a really good weather forecast must be important, because if the sea is very calm and the forecast says it'll stay that way for long enough to reach the next safe harbour, that's got to be the day to go.

I am aware of people venturing on the trips you mentioned. The trip from Glasson to Whitehaven puts you well out to sea where the waves can be big. At Whitehaven yesterday they were about 5 foot on a force 4 wind.

 

I suppose if you chose your time and weather it might be safe. Having been on the Solway and witnessed 6 knot tide races in places I was wondering what those with sea experience in Narrowboats felt.

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Scholar Gypsey,

 

At least you have made some weather boards, but. with respect, I think you need to cover your windows. A strong tonneu type cover over the full well deck as well as the board would be a good idea. Have an anchor ready The wash can be a very serious place.

 

I'm worried that you have a set date for travelling, you need to be flexible to take the best possible forecast.

 

BTW, Whitehaven can be a bit drastic as well! : this link

 

( we have been there in our barge as well as through the Wash)

 

cheers, David

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I'll let you know after crossing the Wash (I hope) on 23rd May - I think that counts as the sea?

 

Here is my weather board ....

 

 

dscf5028.jpg

Sorry, I know nothing about these things but can you shut the doors with that board in place?

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Sorry, I know nothing about these things but can you shut the doors with that board in place?

 

Partly. If it got really wet I would whip the board out & shut the doors.

 

I sincerely hope I will need to do neither: unless the weather is, and is forecast to be, very calm I will not be leaving Denver. (Metcheck currently forecasting 12mph from the SW)

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Partly. If it got really wet I would whip the board out & shut the doors.

 

I sincerely hope I will need to do neither: unless the weather is, and is forecast to be, very calm I will not be leaving Denver. (Metcheck currently forecasting 12mph from the SW)

There's no way I'd be leaving the bow doors open on a tidal crossing.

 

If you can't shut the doors then I'd forget about that board. Shut the doors and duct tape the vents and the gaps 18" above the deck.

 

On the Bristol channel I had a ladder fixed under the roof overhang so that in the event I needed to drop the anchor I could go across the roof to the bow rather than use the gunwale.

 

24ePortisheadmarina_zps91fe941b.jpg

Edited by blackrose
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Partly. If it got really wet I would whip the board out & shut the doors.

 

I sincerely hope I will need to do neither: unless the weather is, and is forecast to be, very calm I will not be leaving Denver. (Metcheck currently forecasting 12mph from the SW)

It isn't just the weather that could cause it to get wet. There will be other boats out there some of which will be making a lot of wash.

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Last time I did Harwich - Hook of Holland on the ferry it was perfectly safe for a pedalo let alone a narrowboat, Its all relative, some boats are safe 365 days a year, some in fair weather only, narrowboats for fewer days that, there's probably a few days every year when the Irish sea is possible, it would be interesting to get some stability data on various lengths of a 7' wide flat bottomed steel tube with no apertures and a few tons of ballast.

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