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Polishicebreaker

fixing holes in hull with cement

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Not canal related but any comments appreciated.

 

Big steel boat, engine room 12" of water from several holes ( some already fixed properly but no time or energy/ money to do more) can pump water out but not dry out completely.

Dry dock, welding, other proper means of repair out of the question currently, boat owner not interested.

Need to keep boat floating for a few more months.

 

If we pour cement into the hull roughly in the right spots, will this temporarily block holes( even partly) or is it a complete waste of time? Holes estimated 5-10mm SQ

any other ideas? Has to be considered without being able to dry bilge and access holes completely

 

thanks

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If the holes are close together try your fingers otherwise rid yourself of the job. You might remind the owner of BOAT, Bring Out Another Thousand.

Being serious the only real option is to get it out of the water and let it dry out before contemplating the next move.

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Can't you/they stop the leaks with, eg, pot menders or tapered sticks and greasy rags knocked in from the inside (if access from outside impossible)? Other bodges are available.

That would give a much better chance for the concrete to work. I think it needs to be concrete rather than plain cement, and a decent layer (maybe 6" minimum), though I'm no expert.

 

 

Tim

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yes concrete sounds good, no pebbles in there of course. Thinking to mix it a little so its semi dry before we put in. The space can be dried out but its one hell of a job, you are right though I'm sure it will give us a better chance...

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That method works well several old boats use it small pebbles in the mix add strength.

 

Can't you/they stop the leaks with, eg, pot menders or tapered sticks and greasy rags knocked in from the inside (if access from outside impossible)? Other bodges are available.

That would give a much better chance for the concrete to work. I think it needs to be concrete rather than plain cement, and a decent layer (maybe 6" minimum), though I'm no expert.

 

 

Tim

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Can you wrap a plastic sheet round that part of the hull? If so, that could keep the water out long enough for you to put the concrete patches in place. Or even, if the boat's static and the berth never dries out, it might completely solve the problem for long enough.

 

Also, why are the holes there? If the hull's corroded that badly, then the holes will only be a warning that others are imminent.

Edited by John Williamson 1955

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Can they not just drive some bungs/wedges in as a temporary fix?

 

It would only ever be a bodge at best though and would certainly need attention in the not too distant future.

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fixed leaks in drains with quick set cement mixed with sharp sand to bulk it out

 

or you could try hydraulic cement

 

or

 

http://www.arcane-industries.co.uk/l1/p382-quick-setting-mortar-stop-major-leaks-instantly.html

 

just remembered....was down an excavation with a damaged storm drain dumping water into the hole, we patched it with some cement that went off virtually as it hit the water, about 2-3 mins. Unfortunately can't remember what it was called but very impressed.

Edited by baz gimson

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It might be worth trying marine epoxy cement.

I had reason to use this when I was descaling some rust and knocked a hole in the hull. Son played the part of the Dutch boy while I slapped on some of this. I kept pressure on the patch for about five minutes until it set and the repair stayed like this for a week until I could organise for some overplating to be done.

I was amazed that it needed a hammer and chisel to remove the patch.

 

All owners of old boats should have some of this on board.

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thanks, epoxy cement sounds good! I wish I read all the replies before I started doing the job! I think the concrete I used was too slow drying for the job. I have managed to block some of the holes with newspaper wedged with wood so that should keep her for a while.

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If using concrete you should use hydraulic cement, not Portland cement. Hydraulic cement sets under water.

 

N

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I temporarily fixed a leak in a steel hull by smearing a load of marineflex over a small piece of old carpet and then pushing it against the leak with a piece of ply behind, the same size as the carpet. The whole lot was then jammed tightly in position with another piece of wood.

Edited by blackrose

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fixed leaks in drains with quick set cement mixed with sharp sand to bulk it out

 

or you could try hydraulic cement

 

or

 

http://www.arcane-industries.co.uk/l1/p382-quick-setting-mortar-stop-major-leaks-instantly.html

 

just remembered....was down an excavation with a damaged storm drain dumping water into the hole, we patched it with some cement that went off virtually as it hit the water, about 2-3 mins. Unfortunately can't remember what it was called but very impressed.

probably jetcem.

 

Neil

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Also...an idea....they use wax rings to seal toilet outlets....it's pliable and it's waterproof.....and I'd say if you squidged a lot of it into any holes in a hull, it would stop ingress?

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SS Great Britain came back from the Falklands on the strength of a concrete patch and some big tack welds. Getting the concrete off again may involve taking the steel off as well.

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I remember making a canoe out of concrete once - believe it or not it floated! All concrete sets under water but the key thing is keeping the concrete 'together' and to keep the water from getting into the concrete before it goes off (temperature is important too). You'd still need to get a seal against the hull though and if it is wet in there when you poured you'd always have some seeping of water I would guess.

 

I should say, I know nothing of boats, I just like them (I do know a bit about concrete though, I worked out once that I have made around 2,000,000 tons of it!)

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