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b0atman

Best pint

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Ever do slightly off topic.

 

My dearest bought me a four pack off McEwans yesterday from Tesco. I half drank one can. It's not my best choice and in addition didn't taste right.

 

I was up twice during the night being sick. I'm okay now.

 

I looked at the other cans and they are out of date by two days when bought. To me,that's not a great problem when buying other items, but I believe canned beer has a shelf life of something like a year.

 

We will return the others obviously. Am I being over reactive?

 

Martyn

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Canned beer it could be the metal deteriorating or a leak in the tin was the beer flat ?

When breweries where asked the question when is beer with best before dates undrinkable no replies where given.

Bottle conditioned ales are still maturing so how do they judge the BBD.

Beer from bottles is certainly better than from cans.

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McEwans? Good grief - that takes me back to the days when your typical Scottish pub had two choice of draught beer, Tennents Lager and McEwans Export - both were fizzy and foul. some places also had Tartan Special, and that was even worse.

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Sometimes a beer punches above its weight. I sometimes buy EPA (I think it's a Marston's brew) from Morrison's, good value at £1.25 a bottle, and its flavour is that of a much stronger beer than its actual 3.6%.

 

Neil, I am not sure of your age, but it may well be that when you started drinking, the strengths of beers were not usually displayed in pubs. So you could be drinking a fairly high-gravity ale without knowing it (though you would tend to find out later). Bass springs to mind - very popular on draught 20 or 30 years ago, and I think about 4.6%.

I go back to the days when finding cask beer was akin to the search for the holy grail. I was a CAMRA member for many years mainly because it was the quickest way of finding a decent pint even in areas where there were loads of pubs. As such I always knew exactly what I was drinking. Back in the early 1970's if you could find a pint of cask Tetleys there was nothing better and there is nothing today that can compare with the quality of beer back then.

 

Many names have disappeared or been assumed by larger companies for example Hartleys produced one of the best beers ever but they were taken over by Robinsons and the stuff they churn out now under that name is awful. Yeats & Jackson, Stones, Wards, Holts, Hydes, Sam Smiths, Thwaites, all produced great beers that you could drink all night and still appreciate.

 

Draught Bass is a very good example of where things have gone wrong. The current brew bears no resemblance to the beer that was sold under that name in the 70's which, BTW, was never more than 4%.

 

If you are ever on the South Oxford, you may care to bear in mind that both Cropredy's pubs, the excellent Brasenose and that thatched one, sell Hook Norton's Hooky which is, from memory, 3.7%

We're moored at Calcutt and the local pub sells this stuff, can't say I'm that impressed but then again I gave up on Southern beer a long time ago... IIRC Fullers still produce a low strength beer that is ok but you don't often see it.

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I go back to the days when finding cask beer was akin to the search for the holy grail. I was a CAMRA member for many years mainly because it was the quickest way of finding a decent pint even in areas where there were loads of pubs.

 

Many names have disappeared or been assumed by larger companies for example Hartleys produced one of the best beers ever but they were taken over by Robinsons and the stuff they churn out now under that name is awful. Yeats & Jackson, Stones, Wards, Holts, Hydes, Sam Smiths, Thwaites, all produced great beers that you could drink all night and still appreciate.

 

 

I used to walk past Camra's H.Q. in St. Albans each morning on my way from my flat in Fleetville to the bus stop, without realising what it was - until that fateful day about 1975 when a friend took me to The Farrier's Arms near the abbey and I watched in amazement as the landlord operated these beer pumps, which until then I had seen only in old films, to dispense McMullen's beer. I've never looked back since! This was the pub in which Camra had been founded and it was popular with the founder members - until the landlord George Vardy, a straight-talking ex-army sergeant, banned them all.

 

Thwaites' is still in Burnley, is it not? I have some at home at the moment - their 4% Yule Love It brew, which Tesco's are kindly flogging off at 99p a bottle.

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I used to walk past Camra's H.Q. in St. Albans each morning on my way from my flat in Fleetville to the bus stop, without realising what it was - until that fateful day about 1975 when a friend took me to The Farrier's Arms near the abbey and I watched in amazement as the landlord operated these beer pumps, which until then I had seen only in old films, to dispense McMullen's beer. I've never looked back since! This was the pub in which Camra had been founded and it was popular with the founder members - until the landlord George Vardy, a straight-talking ex-army sergeant, banned them all.

 

Thwaites' is still in Burnley, is it not? I have some at home at the moment - their 4% Yule Love It brew, which Tesco's are kindly flogging off at 99p a bottle.

Thwaites is actually in Blackburn. They seem to have a few staff relations issues to sort out...http://metro.co.uk/2014/01/25/thwaites-brewery-sign-receives-rude-reworking-after-redundancy-announcement-4276873/

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I used to walk past Camra's H.Q. in St. Albans each morning on my way from my flat in Fleetville to the bus stop, without realising what it was - until that fateful day about 1975 when a friend took me to The Farrier's Arms near the abbey and I watched in amazement as the landlord operated these beer pumps, which until then I had seen only in old films, to dispense McMullen's beer. I've never looked back since! This was the pub in which Camra had been founded and it was popular with the founder members - until the landlord George Vardy, a straight-talking ex-army sergeant, banned them all.

 

Thwaites' is still in Burnley, is it not? I have some at home at the moment - their 4% Yule Love It brew, which Tesco's are kindly flogging off at 99p a bottle.

 

Daniel Thwaites, Star Brewery, Blackburn, IIRC.

Thwaites is actually in Blackburn. They seem to have a few staff relations issues to sort out...http://metro.co.uk/2014/01/25/thwaites-brewery-sign-receives-rude-reworking-after-redundancy-announcement-4276873/

 

And it took them less than a year to do it!

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I can go with Dave Moore's Sadlers pale ale.

I had one in the 'spoons at Stourbridge when they were doing local ales and it was very good.

I like the strong pale ales.

 

The Hartington Whim IPA has already had a mention by Bazza

 

Similar to IPA but local to Notts/Derby is the Blue Monkey Infinity

or Shiny Brewery (behind the Furnace Inn at Derby) Affinity.

 

Incidentally the Furnace Inn/Shiny Brewery won the CAMRA best pub in Derbyshire recently and their beers are picking up an increasing number of awards. Not bad for a run down estate pub revived by a banker called Pedro with his redundancy money.

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I can go with Dave Moore's Sadlers pale ale.

I had one in the 'spoons at Stourbridge when they were doing local ales and it was very good.

I like the strong pale ales.

 

The Hartington Whim IPA has already had a mention by Bazza

 

Similar to IPA but local to Notts/Derby is the Blue Monkey Infinity

or Shiny Brewery (behind the Furnace Inn at Derby) Affinity.

 

Incidentally the Furnace Inn/Shiny Brewery won the CAMRA best pub in Derbyshire recently and their beers are picking up an increasing number of awards. Not bad for a run down estate pub revived by a banker called Pedro with his redundancy money.

I may be preaching to the converted, but do try the Old Oak Inn at Horsley Woodhouse, owned by the Leadmill Brewery and generally with several of their brews on tap along with a guest ale or two.

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For a session I'd opt for either Timmy T's Landlord or Ringwood best. If I'm only out for one or two then I like H and W Tanglefoot, local to where I grew up or Fullers ESB.

 

I quit like the hoppy light beers that pop up in the summer as well, summer lightening ect.

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Always thought that the best pint was the one that put you in a state where you couldn't remember your name never mind the name of the ale!!! cheers.gif

 

This winter I be mainly drinking MileStone IPA (a brewing kit beer), but also some Slaters Top Totty, Salts Burton Ale and a Lincolnshire brewery ale specially brewed for Lincoln Citys Youth Acadamy called Cheeky Imp.

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1. Fuller's London Pride

2. Wadworth's 6X

3. Marston's Pedigree

 

The Anchor Inn, High Offley, has just been awarded CAMRA (Staffs) Pub of the month yet again. Olive did her hair specially for the photo!


Always thought that the best pint was the one that put you in a state where you couldn't remember your name never mind the name of the ale!!! cheers.gif

 

This winter I be mainly drinking MileStone IPA (a brewing kit beer), but also some Slaters Top Totty, Salts Burton Ale and a Lincolnshire brewery ale specially brewed for Lincoln Citys Youth Acadamy called Cheeky Imp.

 

My 'Fast Show' detector just went off.

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If we're talking top three tipples then it has to be:

 

1) Batham's bitter.

 

2) Hophead, from Dark Star.

 

3) Hook Norton's Double Stout.

 

Three completely different beer styles. That's the wonderful thing about beer these days, compared with the 1970s, there is so much variety out there.

 

So why be content with boring, brown, bland beers such as GK IPA, 6X, London Pride, Pedigree etc ?

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If we're talking top three tipples then it has to be:

 

1) Batham's bitter.

 

2) Hophead, from Dark Star.

 

3) Hook Norton's Double Stout.

 

Three completely different beer styles. That's the wonderful thing about beer these days, compared with the 1970s, there is so much variety out there.

 

So why be content with boring, brown, bland beers such as GK IPA, 6X, London Pride, Pedigree etc ?

 

6X, LP and Pedigree are far from being bland. It's all about what your palate wants. I hate coriander, but the missus loves it. I hate all those very pale lemon-flavoured beers, and also I hate all those very dark beers. Including any 'stout'.

 

Brown and bland for me!

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Pick the bones out of this little lot from last years late spring/summer/early autumn cruise.



Holdens Mild 3.7%. No shortage of flavour here. Weighbridge, Alvechurch.



Tianic Stout 4.5%. Also through the card of the other Titanic brews but the stout was my favourite. Royal Exchange, Stone.



Joules Pale Ale 4.1%. Red Lion, Market Drayton.



Old Dog, Weetwood Brewery 4.5%. Black Lion, Nantwich.



Dunham Sweet Stout 4% and Dunham Dark Mild 3.8%. Brewery Tap, Lymm. Several of the Lymm Brewery beers were also excellent. Well worth a stop if on the Bridgewater.



Dinner Ale 4.3% and Oat Mill Stout 5% Bollington Brewery. Vale Inn, Bollington.



Bruins Ruins 5% Beartown Brewery Tap (iirc, it had been a good day) Congleton.



All superb beers for different reasons. Not really answered the OP question as to my “best pint” I suppose really that the answer to that is the pint that is currently in front of me.



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Dinner Ale 4.3%

 

 

What a delightful, almost extinct category - though usually lower in alcohol than that. I think that Harvey's in Lewes brew one from time to time.

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I rarely go to pubs these days and one reason is the lack of decent mid strength draught beer.

 

Our local rarely sells anything below 4.5% which when I began drinking would have been regarded with the same reverence as barley wine, something to get you legless as quick as possible.

 

I guess it is relatively easy to produce/sell these high strength brews but to reduce the alcohol content below 3.5 and still make it taste good seems to be a lost art. But I don't believe there isn't a demand.

 

Leeds Pale (3.8%) is a good session beer, which I have been known to drink in the Brewery Tap after work.

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Until it was bought by Fullers a few years ago our local brewery was Gales. Probably more well known for their fruit wines (which are rather nice). They had a lively strong ale HSB. ( Horndean Special Bitter.). Took a couple of pints to get the taste and you were away.

 

A slightly less potent ale was Butser, named after the nearby hill. You drive through it on the A3 north of Portmouth. Fullers still brew the two ales above and I am told they still use the water. Within the deal was a good number of successful Pubs.

 

The brewery had their own water supply from the South Downs. The brewery had been there for 160 years. The Listed building is no longer a Brewery. You can probably guess, is in the process of becoming flats/apartments. The Yards have now had houses built on.

 

Fullers have built a purpose built distribution depot nearby.

 

Someone in Fullers is switched on.

 

Martyn

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If we're talking top three tipples then it has to be:

 

1) Batham's bitter.

 

2) Hophead, from Dark Star.

 

3) Hook Norton's Double Stout.

 

Three completely different beer styles. That's the wonderful thing about beer these days, compared with the 1970s, there is so much variety out there.

 

So why be content with boring, brown, bland beers such as GK IPA, 6X, London Pride, Pedigree etc ?

 

I had some Dark Star's Hophead at the Loughborough Banter. When I tried it I stopped drinking Castle Rock's Harvest Pale, a great favourite, because the Hophead was better

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I remember (just ! ) drinking several pints of Bathams Special bitter in the Lamp Tavern in Dudley, many years ago. When I went out in to the fresh air I became paralyzed from the waste down and showed all the symptoms of Typhoid.....the only cure was a Desperate Dan cow pie...

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