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Does this seem fairly priced? 1974 46ft £27500


AftApeth
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Hello everyone. I've just joined the site and this is my first post.

 

I've been thinking about getting into the boating lifestyle for a little while and have been more seriously looking at boats for sale over the last month or so. I've been looking on Apollo Duck, eBay, local marina websites, as well as Whilton Marina and Venetian Marina.

 

I'm particularly keen on this boat on Apollo Duck. It's a 1974 46ft cruiser stern, listed at £27500. I've been looking at lots of boats of a similar vintage and size, most of which are priced closer to £20k or in some cases considerably under that. I'm trying to work out why this one is that much higher. I've read the whole of this thread with interest, about offering under the asking price, and am taking some of those points on board. I'd be extremely grateful if anyone on here could have a quick look at the ad and give a quick judgement as to whether they think it's overpriced. A big question for me is why the stern shaft had to be shortened after a recent survey (I confess I don't know yet what this means).

 

I'm not of the mindset of haggling to get the best price possible. I want to pay a fair price, particularly with a view to selling it on in a few years' time and moving on to a bigger boat. I don't want to find that I have to sell for £10k less, say, because I paid far too much initialy.

 

Many thanks to anyone who reads all of this. I realise I'm asking a lot in my first post.

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Bit OTT for the year. I would have expected over plating on a boat that age but no mention of it and looking at the pics it doesn't look like it. There does seem to be a good edge on the bottom plate so it may have been done. If it has, it's a very good job looking at the pics. I'd would expect a boat that age to be nearer 20k like you say but hard to tell without seeing it.

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It's on EA waters, it says 80ft wide is it suitable for narrow canals. It's a short cruiser stern so everything inside is dual purpose (beds/sofas/dinette) can you cope with making the sofa into the bed every night.

 

With a boat that age everything depends on the HULL condition, if the inevitable work has been done well then it's fine for more years, if there is much to do then moor it in shallow water! (til it's all done).

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Having looked at the link now yes it looks very smart for the age but I agree with Arthur Brown, the hull condition is everything at that sort of age and price combination.

 

In addition it is listed as a Narrowboat so the beam needs to be 7ft or less, so the 80ft stated on the advert seems unlikely. It also calls into question in my mind their ability to overlook other little details, like hull condition.

 

MtB

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Thanks chaps for such quick replies. It's really helpful. A few things there I wouldn't have thought about. I'll ask the seller about overplating when I get in touch. Point very well taken about hull condition. Does this stern shaft shortening have anything to do with that, or does it sound like a minor thing?

 

Arthur makes a good point about making up the bed every night. That's one thing I have thought about. What appeals to me about this boat is the snug dinette. I'll be living and working on board once I buy my boat. I'm an editor, so a comfortable and bright area to sit and work with my laptop and monitor is quite high on my list of needs. I'd also like a social area at the stern for the better weather, so am willing to give up a bit of space inside. I think I'm willing to give up a fixed berth for these two things (though I might change my mind after a few weeks of setting up the bed nightly).

 

Funny about the 80' beam. I suppose that might have explained the price. :)

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If the survey by YOUR chosen surveyor, says the hull is exceptionally good with no pitting then it's a fine boat, just a bit over priced. If the surveyor isn't happy then the fitout will need removing to re do much of the hull. so the boat would then be very overpriced.

 

I don't like the fact that there is no "bedroom" so I'd look elsewhere, but IF this boat is as good as the pictures then look again at it.

 

Remember that a boat depreciates to scrap iron value, and there is no "plot" like a house stands on to have value.

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Thanks Arthur. I've just messaged the seller through Apollo Duck to ask if I could see his hull survey from last year. You might be right about the bedroom thing. I suppose it's good to have somewhere to retreat to and just switch off at the end of the day.

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If I were a professional I'd want an office and a separate personal space, If I were a client I'd be very uncomfortable in someone's bedroom. See your work space the way a new customer would. If you are entirely an e-professional with NO client facing time then no-one cares what or where the office. Alternatively look at any of the rental office companies (Regus is one there are many others (no recommendations))

 

Once you entertain on a boat you have to get the toilet to be as easy to use as a hotel toilet.

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A big question for me is why the stern shaft had to be shortened after a recent survey (I confess I don't know yet what this means).

 

No-one has addressed this yet.

 

I suspect by 'stern shaft' being shortened they actually mean the prop shaft. The amount of prop shaft between the back of the blade boss and the back if the stern tube should, by rule of thumb, be no more than the diameter of the shaft. This boat could easily have had 3" or 4" of space so chopping a couple of inches off the inboard end of the prop shaft would fix this. I imagine this is what they mean.

 

MtB

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All rubbish....

 

ninja.gif

 

MtB

Thanks for the thorough description MtB. Probably right or they'd be sold :lol:

 

No-one has addressed this yet.

 

I suspect by 'stern shaft' being shortened they actually mean the prop shaft. The amount of prop shaft between the back of the blade boss and the back if the stern tube should, by rule of thumb, be no more than the diameter of the shaft. This boat could easily have had 3" or 4" of space so chopping a couple of inches off the inboard end of the prop shaft would fix this. I imagine this is what they mean.

 

MtB

Stern shaft might mean tailshaft in the sense maybe it has a short length of shaft with some sort of universal joint arrangement between that and the engine. so if the UJ or python drive or whatever was changed then the tailshaft may have needed to be shortened.

 

possibly

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Ask all the leading questions and do not buy without a proper survey, at that vintage you need one for insurance purposes anyway.

 

It looks a well loved and cared for boat and quite sweet and homely.

 

In the end it comes down to " no foot no horse , no hull no boat " hull condition is the most important factor. It's hard to make satisfactory repairs to a fitted out boat.

 

Oh good luck and welcome too. Keep coming back and asking questions.

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If I were a professional I'd want an office and a separate personal space, If I were a client I'd be very uncomfortable in someone's bedroom. See your work space the way a new customer would. If you are entirely an e-professional with NO client facing time then no-one cares what or where the office. Alternatively look at any of the rental office companies (Regus is one there are many others (no recommendations))

 

Once you entertain on a boat you have to get the toilet to be as easy to use as a hotel toilet.

Thankfully I can work entirely remotely. Just need laptop, internet connection and occasionally my graphics tablet for marking up PDFs by hand. I'll only have social visitors. Still, I need some separation from work space and living space, which is why I've ruled out another boat I liked with a great work space – it would have had to convert to my bed of an evening. With this one, I'm thinking that the sofa in the lounge could become my regular bed, and I can keep my work stuff set up at the dining table.

 

Toilet looks like a flushing pumpout, which I think is a bonus? I've only done a little research on this so far, admittedly. Think I'd rather arrange a pumpout service every few weeks than sort out Elsan disposal every few days. (If it sounds like I know what I'm talking about, I hasten to add I've only just learnt some of these words and am a little hazy on the practical details.)

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Thankfully I can work entirely remotely. Just need laptop, internet connection and occasionally my graphics tablet for marking up PDFs by hand. I'll only have social visitors. Still, I need some separation from work space and living space, which is why I've ruled out another boat I liked with a great work space – it would have had to convert to my bed of an evening. With this one, I'm thinking that the sofa in the lounge could become my regular bed, and I can keep my work stuff set up at the dining table.

 

Toilet looks like a flushing pumpout, which I think is a bonus? I've only done a little research on this so far, admittedly. Think I'd rather arrange a pumpout service every few weeks than sort out Elsan disposal every few days. (If it sounds like I know what I'm talking about, I hasten to add I've only just learnt some of these words and am a little hazy on the practical details.)

 

Try a new thread on that one

 

:cheers:

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No-one has addressed this yet.

 

I suspect by 'stern shaft' being shortened they actually mean the prop shaft. The amount of prop shaft between the back of the blade boss and the back if the stern tube should, by rule of thumb, be no more than the diameter of the shaft. This boat could easily have had 3" or 4" of space so chopping a couple of inches off the inboard end of the prop shaft would fix this. I imagine this is what they mean.

 

MtB

 

 

Thanks for the thorough description MtB. Probably right or they'd be sold laugh.png

Stern shaft might mean tailshaft in the sense maybe it has a short length of shaft with some sort of universal joint arrangement between that and the engine. so if the UJ or python drive or whatever was changed then the tailshaft may have needed to be shortened.

 

possibly

 

Thanks for this. I googled 'stern shaft' and didn't get much wiser about this. I spent a bit of time looking at the very first photo in that listing wondering if I could see what was meant. Without any technical understanding, I was worried that this was something to do with the hull maybe being corroded in part and cut down to stop the corrosion. But thinking a little more about it, it sounds like it has something to do with the engine reconditioning he mentions in the listing.

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When asking such questions on this forum please bear in mind that nothing seems to be worth anything to anyone on here.

 

The other thing to remember is that some people tend to negatively exaggerate how much they paid for things themselves, in order to rationalise the costs in their minds.

Edited by blackrose
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Google for "narrowboat stern tube assembly",m then click 'images'.

 

That brings up lots of nice pictures so you'll understand the arrangement.

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=narrowboat+stern+tube+assembly&client=firefox-a&hs=znq&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=sb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=en5wVN2oD9XvaIC5gbAE&ved=0CCIQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=902

 

 

MtB

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When asking such questions on this forum please bear in mind that nothing seems to be worth anything to anyone on here.

 

The other thing to remember is that some people tend to negatively exaggerate how much they paid for things themselves, in order to rationalise the costs in their minds.

 

Whats that ?

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