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Robbo

Glue recommendation for repairing wooden mast.

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Good morning,

 

Looking for recommendations for wood glue that can repair my wooden mast on my sailing boat that is coming apart in various places length way's up the mast where the separate planks are joined.

 

It's about a 4mm gap, is it best to use a fill glue, or clamp together and use a "standard glue"..

 

Cheers,
Robbo

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Hi ya Robbo,

Yep, Cascamite is good !. & you may even have to Resin wrap it if on a stress part of the Mast.

Edited by Paul's Nulife4-2

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Cascamite it's a powderd wood glue

Yes. Excellent stuff. Twenty years ago I mended a friend's butty tiller which he snapped in two when he caught it on a bridgehole. It's still going strong, I believe,

(He was very grateful because it wasn't his butty. The owner never knew about the repair once it had been repainted.)

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Cascamite is great stuff. I know several bowyers that use it in between the laminations of high poundage warbows (similar to what was found on the Mary Rose but they were one piece Yew). If it can withstand the forces within a 180# bow, then it should be good for a mast.

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Cascamite then whipping fine cord to close the gap.

I go with that...but Cascamite can become prone to damp...( I know as 30 years ago I worked for Borden chemicals who manufactured it)

 

I'd Cascamite...and then use some cord of maybe 1.5- 2mm..and a nice colour...to bind the outside over the whole joint.... varnish to 'seal it' and secure it...and make it waterproof.

Edited by Bobbybass

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I'm amazed.

 

My first thought was 'Cascamite', but thought everyone else would think it old-fashioned and recommend something newer ;)

 

Tim

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West or similar epoxy with either filleting blend or colloidal silica to thicken it up to fill the gap

 

Should qualify as the modern alternative!

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Thanks for the recommendations folks, my dad has some glue left over from a project which he recommends. I'll post here the make to see if suitable, I think it's one of those modern fill type. I'm using Owatrol D1 and D2 to oil and varnish.

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Thanks for the recommendations folks, my dad has some glue left over from a project which he recommends. I'll post here the make to see if suitable, I think it's one of those modern fill type. I'm using Owatrol D1 and D2 to oil and varnish.

 

I have just done the bowsprit, masts, booms and Gaffs on my ketch with the Owatrol system, its time consuming, not least the 12 coats of D2 (6 recommended minimum) but what a finish!

My main mast (newly made) soaked up 5lts of D1 all on its own.

I also have to deal with the shakes in some of my spars, especially the newly made main mast which was constructed during that very hot period a month or so ago.

I can’t make my mind up whether to fill the shakes or leave them open. I am tending to the view that they are best left open so that water getting in can quickly dry out again, trouble with filling is that you have to do an absolutely water tight job or you just trap the moisture in and accelerate the rot. At least the shakes helped with the D1 penetration!

I know your problem is slightly different, but talk of splits in wood got me thinking about it again.

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Splits in vertical spars are less problematical than those in horizontal spars - like booms.

 

As somebody said, the water will run off a vertical spar, but might settle in a horizontal spar, where it will cause rot in summer, and could freeze in winter.

 

It's more important to fill the gaps (to exclude water) than it is to repair the split by using glue. Many glues, especially strong ones like epoxy, are more rigid than the wood, and could cause stress when the wood bends. This could make things worse.

 

So in most cases the the best solution is to fill the gaps with a filler that will withstand sunlight, water and cold, and remain flexible. There are various possibilities,and I regret to say I don't have a recommendation - I am still trying to find the best product.

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Splits in vertical spars are less problematical than those in horizontal spars - like booms.

 

As somebody said, the water will run off a vertical spar, but might settle in a horizontal spar, where it will cause rot in summer, and could freeze in winter.

 

It's more important to fill the gaps (to exclude water) than it is to repair the split by using glue. Many glues, especially strong ones like epoxy, are more rigid than the wood, and could cause stress when the wood bends. This could make things worse.

 

So in most cases the the best solution is to fill the gaps with a filler that will withstand sunlight, water and cold, and remain flexible. There are various possibilities,and I regret to say I don't have a recommendation - I am still trying to find the best product.

 

That's why its good to do some whipping with cord...and then varnish the cord.

 

Cascamite is an incredibly strong glue.

It's based upon milk...and is readily absorbed into the grain of the wood and then forms a strong bond.

Much furniture used to be glued with it..

 

It doesn't 'grab' so needs heavy supporting/ bracing while drying and gives the impression that it's not holding....but you need to give it time to set. Once set..the bond is great..but its good to wrap it ...circle around and around the joint from before the break until after it. Then varnish that to keep the water out.

 

Bob

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