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LEO

Sae 30 or.......

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Hi,

 

Gardner 2LW 112695, is needing an oil change......... so I called at Classic Oils in Aylesbury to purchase some Sae 30, but the owner suggested ....

 

Morris's Golden Film Classic Marine 10W40 a low detergent oil, especially developed for narrowboats, where an Sae 30 is specified and the engine incorporates a filter.

 

Ok, so it is expensive but the advantages include - easier cranking in winter, quicker oil delivery to avoid wear during cold starts and good general lubrication when hot.

 

These points make sense, especially the delivery on cold start up (when most wear occurs).

 

I contacted the technical dept. at Morris's who confirmed the above and the oils properties - but indicated it must be 'Golden Film'.

 

Suitability for gearboxes - the technical specialist said it should be 'OK'. but I think I will stick with Sae 30 for the PRM 260 unit I have.

 

No connection with Classic oils, but they do supply lots of oil for vintage cars locally (Bentleys downwards). If visiting their outlet in Aylesbury take some extra cash as it incorporates a brilliant ironmongery.............. the owner - Guy was interested and helpful....... and realistic on price.

 

Anybody else tried this multi grade?.

 

L

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Hi,

 

Gardner 2LW 112695, is needing an oil change......... so I called at Classic Oils in Aylesbury to purchase some Sae 30, but the owner suggested ....

 

Morris's Golden Film Classic Marine 10W40 a low detergent oil, especially developed for narrowboats, where an Sae 30 is specified and the engine incorporates a filter.

 

Ok, so it is expensive but the advantages include - easier cranking in winter, quicker oil delivery to avoid wear during cold starts and good general lubrication when hot.

 

These points make sense, especially the delivery on cold start up (when most wear occurs).

 

I contacted the technical dept. at Morris's who confirmed the above and the oils properties - but indicated it must be 'Golden Film'.

 

Suitability for gearboxes - the technical specialist said it should be 'OK'. but I think I will stick with Sae 30 for the PRM 260 unit I have.

 

No connection with Classic oils, but they do supply lots of oil for vintage cars locally (Bentleys downwards). If visiting their outlet in Aylesbury take some extra cash as it incorporates a brilliant ironmongery.............. the owner - Guy was interested and helpful....... and realistic on price.

 

Anybody else tried this multi grade?.

 

L

I have not used it in a gardner engine but as log as it has more modern design of filter be that cartridge or spin-on canister it will be OK. The API rating is CC so is low detergent as your man said. it is a full mineral oil too. So unless the engine is rather warn and needs a a thicker oil to get the oil pressure kick started from cold I can't see it will be an issue and more likely a benefit with easier starting and better low temp running with the oil getting to where it's needed faster. Morris oils are very good quality.

 

However, if your engine is not used for several months at a time it is possible that the Morris 10W40 oil will drain more from the bearing surfaces over time than a straight SAE30 although the Morris oil has very good "cling" characteristics I believe.

 

I have used it in a Beta engine but actually prefer a slightly higher spec (API CF) normally.

 

Edit to say I can't see why it would be an issue using the same oil in a PRM hydraulic box. After all PRM just say use what you put in the engine and plenty of people with more modern style engines will be using a multi grade.

Edited by churchward

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I use it in my beta 1505 and PRM gearbox. Not that I can tell the difference between this and other oils, the engine still works and there's no smoke coming out the back!

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I use Rock Oil sae30 in my 2lw. I have now completed 1700hrs, still no oil used between 400hr oil changes. I am happy. I understand that straight grade oil keeps its qualities for longer than multi grades.

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A bottle of Morris 10W40 was in our new(old) boat when we got it and I heard murmers of approval for Morris oils. Bought another bottle from Lyons Boatyard on the Stratford Canal. Changed engine oil twice and thought I'd get another bottle - but from where? Neither Lower Heyford Boatyard nor Tooleys in Banbury (Oxford Canal) had 10W40. Calcutt on Grand Union = nope. Kate's boatyard Warwick = nope.

Contacted Morris by e-mail yesterday and a phone call from them today said: 1) order online 2) phone to their head office and ask where to get some.

I think the real answer is to change oil often, best thing you can do for an engine. You don't need to change the filter every oil change, only when the filter's time is up (and perhaps beyond that if you've been changiing the oil more frequently than recommended - the constant fresh oil will keep the filter cleaner and less clogged - that's my theory anyway).

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A bottle of Morris 10W40 was in our new(old) boat when we got it and I heard murmers of approval for Morris oils. Bought another bottle from Lyons Boatyard on the Stratford Canal. Changed engine oil twice and thought I'd get another bottle - but from where? Neither Lower Heyford Boatyard nor Tooleys in Banbury (Oxford Canal) had 10W40. Calcutt on Grand Union = nope. Kate's boatyard Warwick = nope.

Contacted Morris by e-mail yesterday and a phone call from them today said: 1) order online 2) phone to their head office and ask where to get some.

 

In my experience it is far easier to find the 10W/40 Morris Golden Film in canal outlets than say the 20W/50.

 

The 10W/40 is a standard stock item at Midland Chandlers, for example, whereas the 20W/50 is not.

 

Generally buying direct from Morris seems to be the most expensive way - even chandlers usually undercut Morris' online prices.

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I was told by an engineer friend that multigrade oils are not suitable for cool running slow revving engines. He advised using SAE30 high detergent oil. I used to use this until the price rocketed I now tend to use Tesco diesel oil and find that it stay much cleaner for longer

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A bottle of Morris 10W40 was in our new(old) boat when we got it and I heard murmers of approval for Morris oils. Bought another bottle from Lyons Boatyard on the Stratford Canal. Changed engine oil twice and thought I'd get another bottle - but from where? Neither Lower Heyford Boatyard nor Tooleys in Banbury (Oxford Canal) had 10W40. Calcutt on Grand Union = nope. Kate's boatyard Warwick = nope.

Contacted Morris by e-mail yesterday and a phone call from them today said: 1) order online 2) phone to their head office and ask where to get some.

I think the real answer is to change oil often, best thing you can do for an engine. You don't need to change the filter every oil change, only when the filter's time is up (and perhaps beyond that if you've been changiing the oil more frequently than recommended - the constant fresh oil will keep the filter cleaner and less clogged - that's my theory anyway).

Why would you change the oil but not the filter for the few quid they cost?

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"Why would you change the oil but not the filter for the few quid they cost?"

 

I have been doing this with my car(s) for many years and it seems sensible to me. I may be wrong, and if anybody can tell me why my theory/method is wrong, I'm happy to be corrected/educated:

 

My current car, which I've had for 12 years, takes 3.3 litres of engine oil, 3.5 when you change the filter, this means the filter has 0.2 litres in it.

 

3.3 litres is 94% of 3.5 litres. The recommended interval for filter change is 15,000 kilometres (9375 miles). If I change the 3.3 litres of oil, say, every 4000 kilometres that means the engine gets 4 lots of new oil during the 15,000km. Anyway, 94% is changed three times and 100% changed on the fourth time during that 15,000km stretch.

 

The filter gets changed every 15,000km - though I would bet they can go for much longer, especially if having the oil changed this frequently.

 

Why change the filter at 4000km, 8000km & 12,000km? It's hardly likely to be blocked, and the amount of 'old black oil' that would go through, what of it - it would have been going round the engine anyway if I changed the oil just every 15,000km.

 

I think changing the bulk of the oil often is one of the best things you can do for an engine - having those bearings swimming in nice clean golden oil. Also gives a good psychological feeling seeing that black used oil coming out and fresh oil going in. By the way, never had an issue with my car's engine, bearing and rings running fine.

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I would like to know the answer. But to us the oil filter is £4 for a genuine Volvo filter. The oil is £26.

 

For the sake of an extra £4 twice (sometimes three times) a year, why wouldn't you?

 

I don't see the point in going to the effort of doing the expensive bit but not the cheaper bit!

 

After all on a boat there is also the oil in the sump you can't get out. So it isn't 94% you are changing!

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"I don't see the point in going to the effort of doing the expensive bit but not the cheaper bit!" -

 

I don't see the point of changing a filter if it doesn't need changing...

 

"After all on a boat there is also the oil in the sump you can't get out. So it isn't 94% you are changing!" -

 

I was referring to my car, but on our boat engine, yes, we have done it from the sump plug - sticking a hand pump tube down the dipstick hole seems bizarre, you're left with all the heavy stuff down in the sump which will definitely get mixed in with fresh oil poured in. Always sump plug - cat litter tray underneath. If you can, that is.

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I was told by an engineer friend that multigrade oils are not suitable for cool running slow revving engines. He advised using SAE30 high detergent oil. I used to use this until the price rocketed I now tend to use Tesco diesel oil and find that it stay much cleaner for longer

 

Monograde yes but surely not high detergent for most slow revving vintage diesels. You want low detergent/dispersant (API CB or CC) so the nasties fall freely to the bottom of the sump out of harms way rather than holding them in suspension, since many don't have a full flow filter to catch them anyway. Carbon build-up stays in place as well reducing smoking etc.

Edited by by'eck

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Hi,

 

Thanks for all the input but after careful consideration I have decided a Sae30 is the best oil to use........better to be safe than sorry.

 

L.

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