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Alan&sue

Keys

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Hi

Ok I'm aware we are pretty green behind the ears in the boating world :)

but as the saying goes " you're never to old to learn"

 

So I no we need a CRT key & a lock key so do we need a antivandel key as well :(

 

So could some kind soul explain why

 

Thanks

Sue x

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Hi

Ok I'm aware we are pretty green behind the ears in the boating world :)

but as the saying goes " you're never to old to learn"

So I no we need a CRT key & a lock key so do we need a antivandel key as well :(

So could some kind soul explain why

Thanks

Sue x

You need a key formerly known as a 'Bw water mate key' and you need an anti vandal key sometimes known as as anti vandal key.

 

Why?...

 

Because various parts of the system need both.

 

If it looks like a 'Yale' lock you need the former, if it,s unlocked using a little 'square' you need the latter.

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CRT key unlocks facility doors(toilets and elsan in some areas) , it also acts as an anti vandal key on some mechanisms on some waterways.

Lock key is also called a windlass.

Anti vandal key can be an inverted alan-key device, handcuff key, Nene needs the one Doghouse describes..or other, depending on the waterway you are travelling on.

Edited by matty40s
  • Greenie 1

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Cheers

So :)

The CRT key is for facilities ( loos & showers) & the windlass has the square end for locks & the antivandel ( handcuff) is for other locks

 

Thanks

:) x

 

Thanks kind souls :-)

Feeling good :)

fingers crossed boats being surveyed on Wednesday then hey ho away we go we are sailing we are sailing x

Edited by Alan&sue

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Anti-vandal is for locks in areas which are subject to vandalism and are used in addition to a windlass to operate locks.

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Cheers

So :)

The CRT key is for facilities ( loos & showers) & the windlass has the square end for locks & the antivandel ( handcuff) is for other locks

Thanks

:) x

You also use the 'CRT aka BW watermate key to operate the big hydraulic locks and the big lift and swing bridges up here.

 

The 'hand cuff' key is also often used to unfasten the chains securing swing bridges as on the Leeds and Liverpool.

 

In short you need both. If unsure which one you will need for a particular lock or bridge take both to save a walk back to the boat.

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Hi

Ok I'm aware we are pretty green behind the ears in the boating world smile.png

but as the saying goes " you're never to old to learn"

 

So I no we need a CRT key & a lock key so do we need a antivandel key as well sad.png

 

So could some kind soul explain why

 

Thanks

Sue x

 

Actually you need two of each, at least.

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The anti-vandal key is also known as a "water conservation key" which is more politically correct than "anti vandal". It is also known a a "handcuff key" as the locking "shackles" on the L&L look like little handcuffs. As said above its good to have 2; these are used in some less salubrious areas and so if you drop one in the cut you probably don't want to spend the night there!

 

.........Dave

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CR&T prices:

 

Canal & River Trust facilities key

£ 6.00

Handcuff key (anti-vandal locks)

£ 5.00

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The anti-vandal key is also known as a "water conservation key" which is more politically correct than "anti vandal". It is also known a a "handcuff key" as the locking "shackles" on the L&L look like little handcuffs. As said above its good to have 2; these are used in some less salubrious areas and so if you drop one in the cut you probably don't want to spend the night there!

 

.........Dave

I didn't realise this was a name mainly used in the north but it explains why I got a very strange look at Calcutt when I asked for a handcuff key.

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Many locks and swing bridges also require a CRT key to operate/unlock them

 

Tim

a very small percentage of CRT locks and swing bridges require a CRT key to operate them........

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CR&T prices:

 

 

Canal & River Trust facilities key

 

 

£ 6.00

 

 

Handcuff key (anti-vandal locks)

Guess what :) I've just ordered some x

 

 

£ 5.00

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We each also carried a full set of all the boat keys, my wife's set lived in her handbag. Although we never needed them I dread to think of the consequences if I'd dropped mine in the cut.

 

Alex

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a very small percentage of CRT locks and swing bridges require a CRT key to operate them........

Oxford Canal and on the K&A you need a windlass to release them

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BW/CRT/Watermate key (the Yale-type one) sometimes opens a canalside box of local information leaflets (eg at Rugeley you can get a map of the town and shops).

 

If you know someone with a motorhome, ask if you can borrow theirs ( recent thread).

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If anyone ever needs an example of how something so simple can be made confusing by this forum, this thread is a classic.

  • Greenie 1

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If anyone ever needs an example of how something so simple can be made confusing by this forum, this thread is a classic.

 

... but nobody has yet mentioned the different Yale key you need for the Middle Level, nor I think the Abloy key you need for the Nene and the Great Ouse.

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If anyone ever needs an example of how something so simple can be made confusing by this forum, this thread is a classic.

Because there is no straightforward answer due to different bits of the system infrastructure utilising both types of 'key' and even in some cases a windlass too.

 

You just need to be prepared to use any.

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If anyone ever needs an example of how something so simple can be made confusing by this forum, this thread is a classic.

Greeny issued

:)

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Thanks kind souls :-)

Feeling good smile.png

fingers crossed boats being surveyed on Wednesday then hey ho away we go we are sailing we are sailing x

 

Woohoo! clapping.gif

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If anyone ever needs an example of how something so simple can be made confusing by this forum, this thread is a classic.

I'm just glad the original poster didn't ask about toilets.

:)

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... of course, there are TWO sizes of lock paddle spindle, one of which is tapered. Not to worry, though, most windlasses (called "lock keys" by hire companies, and "handles" by normal people) have holes for both.

 

On the Calder and Hebble - a must, for its beauty, for the Barge and Barrel, and for the deepest lock (ducks) - you also need a "handspike" to work some locks.

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