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darbon

Charging 24v Bow Thruster Batteries

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Hi,

 

I'm looking at the wiring for my bow thrusters. I have a 12v starter/domestic system on board, charged using a Sterling Alt/Batt charger.

 

My bow thrusters are 24v, so my plan is to site 2x 12v starter batteries (in series) next to the bow thruster and run the switching cables back to the stern. My big question is the best or cheapest method of charging the 24v bank? Both 240-12v or 12-24v chargers seem pretty expensive. I'd also imagine that a 12-24v charger would also require some heavy cables.

 

Any advice would be appreciated!

 

Thanks

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A suitable set of switchery/relays would enable you to charge the two batteries at 12V in parallel off the existing Sterling, but put them in series when you turned on the underwater klaxon.

 

Alternatively put an extra 24V alternator on the engine and charge the BT batteries with this.

 

N

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If you can engineer an engine driven 24 volt charging source via dedicated alternator or DC to DC converter (Sterling B to B charger for example), you will minimise volt drop on the long charge feed cable to bow of boat.

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Who decided on 12V for some of the boat and 24V for the other?

 

Anyway, I reckon the best (least worst) way is a DC-to-DC converter to step up 12V to 24V for charging.

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I have 12v domestics but 24v engine starting. The engine battery is charged from a 10A Adverc 12v-24v battery to battery charger. Great bit of kit. Only cuts in when the domestic voltage reaches about 13.4 so the engine battery's can be kept charged from the main battery charger as well as the alternator. Think it cost about £100 although that was a few years ago. Just sits there quietly doing its job. They can be paralleled too for higher current requirements.

 

Cheers

 

Gareth

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Hi all!

 

I have a 24v Bow thruster run by 2 x 12v batteries, they in turn are charged by a 24v charger.

They are all in the forepeak of the boat, far away from the boats other charging systems.

 

The charger gets it's power from a fused switch-able spur, taken from the boats 240v ring main.

The charger is only switched on when out cruising, or when on shore power.

The fused spur has a bright red neon indicator, this is so it doesn't get left switched on, as it has a tendency to flatten the main service batteries when the engine has stopped!

Don't ask me how I found out about this! blush.png

Nipper

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Hi all!

 

I have a 24v Bow thruster run by 2 x 12v batteries, they in turn are charged by a 24v charger.

They are all in the forepeak of the boat, far away from the boats other charging systems.

 

The charger gets it's power from a fused switch-able spur, taken from the boats 240v ring main.

The charger is only switched on when out cruising, or when on shore power.

The fused spur has a bright red neon indicator, this is so it doesn't get left switched on, as it has a tendency to flatten the main service batteries when the engine has stopped!

Don't ask me how I found out about this! blush.png

Nipper

I think this is the way to go rather than running low voltage cables the length of the boat with the resulting volt drop. maybe improved with a relay to switch the charger on and off so it doesn't get forgotten.

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I think this is the way to go rather than running low voltage cables the length of the boat with the resulting volt drop. maybe improved with a relay to switch the charger on and off so it doesn't get forgotten.

Yes, that's an idea, but at the moment, it gives the crew a responsibility and something to press! wacko.png

 

My main problem is that I have the two sealed normal 110 amp batteries, the Charger and the SidePower control box all in the same unvented locker in front deck under the cratch.

 

I'd be interested in what batteries I should be using and what size?

 

I'll get back with the what power the Side power is, but I think it's a 10hp hydraulic.

 

Nipper

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Yes, that's an idea, but at the moment, it gives the crew a responsibility and something to press! wacko.png

 

My main problem is that I have the two sealed normal 110 amp batteries, the Charger and the SidePower control box all in the same unvented locker in front deck under the cratch.

 

I'd be interested in what batteries I should be using and what size?

 

I'll get back with the what power the Side power is, but I think it's a 10hp hydraulic.

 

Nipper

 

Starter batteries should be ideal given the large but short term current involved. Having said that I have at present two sealed 110 Ah leisure (multi-purpose) batteries in parallel for my 9hp Nobels.

 

I would be surprised if your SidePower thruster is hydraulic given your mention of batteries. Use of an electro-hydraulic power pack is possible I suppose, but seems an unnecessary complication for a BT.

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Starter batteries should be ideal given the large but short term current involved. Having said that I have at present two sealed 110 Ah leisure (multi-purpose) batteries in parallel for my 9hp Nobels.

 

I would be surprised if your SidePower thruster is hydraulic given your mention of batteries. Use of an electro-hydraulic power pack is possible I suppose, but seems an unnecessary complication for a BT.

 

Yes your right, it is not a hydraulic one. But I can't seem to lay my hands on the paperwork that tells me what HP it is.

 

I don't like the idea of an unvented locker containing two big batteries, so I'll cut some holes and put a louvered vent there at some stage, but in the mean time I'll read up on proper sealed batteries.

 

 

Nipper

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Not knowing the full setup of your boat.

 

I would think the easiest way would be to use a 240v 24v charger. It wouldn't have to be that high a charge rate assuming you just blip your BT. It could be easily switched by a voltage sensing relay on the 12v side so the charger is only switched on when the engine is running, or the inverter was charging the batteries from the mains.

 

Doing a low voltage charge would need some pretty heavy cabling to overcome the voltage drop. if its not already there. 240v with a local charger would be so much less disruptive with installation. Probably cheaper too given the cost of copper.

 

My 12v BT batteries are supplied by 64mm/2 cabling which I stuff 14.8v volts up from the engine or Victron charge to cover the losses.

 

If I was doing a retrofit it would be a dedicated 240v charger.

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