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So as a last ditch epoxy metal repair before the holiday, I chiselled off the last unsuccessful repair, emptied the coolant system, cleaned the metal, decreased, made a brass plate to fit around the seized outflow tap, mixed the epoxy, plastered it on with a 3 minute hardening time and clamped the brass plate over to force it into the crack.

Tommorow I will refill the coolant and hope for a temporary solution that needs a much bigger fix within an couple of years.

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20210707_233523.jpg

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Wednesday: Removed the mushroom that sprouted overnight (!) from the RHS end of my hatch.  That is, the wood lining of my steel hatch.

Thursday:     Removed the mushroom that sprouted overnight (!) from the LHS end of my hatch.  

 

Perhaps there is a hint here as to the state of the wood lining ???

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  • 2 weeks later...

Used some cheap emergency (space) blankets as solar reflective window film.

(Heath Robinson would have been proud of me😏).

 

Of course nothing beats mooring in the shade of a large tree, so this is for when that option is not available and for when under way.


I proved the concept worked well last summer at home, so I’ve temporarily lined our boats windows with this same cheap as chips film.

Bramble - 10 Large Multi-Purpose Insulated Foil Emergency Blankets - 210x160cm for £9.99 from Amazon (sorry - other suppliers are available😏).

 

On the plus side the perceived reduction in heat is quite noticeable.

There are a few downsides though…

On dull days the effect is akin to wearing dark glasses inside, so rather gloomy.

Also it is a bit of a faff cutting to size and temporally attaching to each window with masking tape.

 

At home I’ve treated each of the south facing bedrooms and cut separate panels for the opening windows. However, on the boat we normally remove the hopper glass for ventilation, so only about 2/3 of each window has been treated. The effect will obviously be less, but I feel it’s still been worth the effort.

 

A single pack was more than enough for the boat + selected windows at home.
I’ve no idea how big any compromise is by using my cheap method compared with purpose made solar film, but it works well enough for me for some temporary relief during this heatwave.

Incidentally, the fold lines make it easier to cut the panels square.

 

22BA2CD7-CE8F-494E-A9BF-6AAAB2FC42A1.jpeg
 

79CAED0E-7447-4834-B50C-659CE072427F.jpeg

Edited by gbclive
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  • 2 months later...

Every couple of years there is "toilet day"! -when I

  • replace the short length (~3ft?) of white 1.5" hose that rises up immediately from the back of my excellent Jabsco DeLuxe Flush toilet up to the long extra-thick ABS pipe down to my pumpout tank 2.5M away,
  • replace the "joker" valve in the toilet (the one that prevents fluids returning to the bowl from the pipework.
  •  when necessary, adjusting the brackets that keep the seat in the right position.

 It is not a difficult or smelly/messy job if done properly.  If not done every couple of years, the toilet starts to smell.

 

This is the procedure I have just used:

 

1.  Identify your model of Jabsco toilet and obtain the appropriate new joker valve.

2.  Clean the toilet.

3.  Full-flush the toilet 3 times to ensure all the pipework contains clear water.

4.  Turn 12V power to the toilet off.

5.  Remove the 4 screws holding the china body to the floor and ease forward.

6.  Remove the 2 pan head screws holding the 2 parts of the plastic angle inside the works at the back together and separate them.  The joker valve sits inside them and can now be replaced.  Note that some water, not a lot, corresponding to the capacity of the rising white hose, will drain out at this point and can be readily trapped in a suitably sized plastic tray.  The size relates to the ability to fit in the space inside the back of the toilet.

7.  Release the top end of the white hose from the spigot that connects it to the ABS pipe.  This is more difficult because the fit here is very tight (in my case).  I cut it off after releasing the 2 jubilee clips but it would be easier perhaps to heat the hose using eg a hair dryer.

8.  Release the 2 jubilee clips holding the other end of the white hose to the plastic angle.

The old hose is now free.

9.  Cut a new piece of hose to the same length as the old piece.

10.  Install the new hose, reversing the uninstall process, but soaking the ends of the white hose in boiling water for 1 minute before fitting to spigots.  The water must be near boiling, just too hot to touch is not good enough.  When it is hot enough it goes on very easily.  Take care not to scald yourself!

 

I have heard it alleged that there is a bitumin-coated hose available that doesn't become porous like the conventional white hose but I have not had an opportunity to investigate.

 

 

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On 29/09/2021 at 20:01, system 4-50 said:

Every couple of years there is "toilet day"! -when I

  • replace the short length (~3ft?) of white 1.5" hose that rises up immediately from the back of my excellent Jabsco DeLuxe Flush toilet up to the long extra-thick ABS pipe down to my pumpout tank 2.5M away,
  • replace the "joker" valve in the toilet (the one that prevents fluids returning to the bowl from the pipework.
  •  when necessary, adjusting the brackets that keep the seat in the right position.

 It is not a difficult or smelly/messy job if done properly.  If not done every couple of years, the toilet starts to smell.

 

This is the procedure I have just used:

 

1.  Identify your model of Jabsco toilet and obtain the appropriate new joker valve.

2.  Clean the toilet.

3.  Full-flush the toilet 3 times to ensure all the pipework contains clear water.

4.  Turn 12V power to the toilet off.

5.  Remove the 4 screws holding the china body to the floor and ease forward.

6.  Remove the 2 pan head screws holding the 2 parts of the plastic angle inside the works at the back together and separate them.  The joker valve sits inside them and can now be replaced.  Note that some water, not a lot, corresponding to the capacity of the rising white hose, will drain out at this point and can be readily trapped in a suitably sized plastic tray.  The size relates to the ability to fit in the space inside the back of the toilet.

7.  Release the top end of the white hose from the spigot that connects it to the ABS pipe.  This is more difficult because the fit here is very tight (in my case).  I cut it off after releasing the 2 jubilee clips but it would be easier perhaps to heat the hose using eg a hair dryer.

8.  Release the 2 jubilee clips holding the other end of the white hose to the plastic angle.

The old hose is now free.

9.  Cut a new piece of hose to the same length as the old piece.

10.  Install the new hose, reversing the uninstall process, but soaking the ends of the white hose in boiling water for 1 minute before fitting to spigots.  The water must be near boiling, just too hot to touch is not good enough.  When it is hot enough it goes on very easily.  Take care not to scald yourself!

 

I have heard it alleged that there is a bitumin-coated hose available that doesn't become porous like the conventional white hose but I have not had an opportunity to investigate.

 

 

Thank you - a post many of us may one day be glad of! I've a Jabsco macerator toilet and was aware that the Joker was an item that oft needed replacement, but I can't find anything called that on my exploded diagram. Is there another name for the Joker, or don't all Jabsco macerators have them?

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30 minutes ago, Sea Dog said:

Thank you - a post many of us may one day be glad of! I've a Jabsco macerator toilet and was aware that the Joker was an item that oft needed replacement, but I can't find anything called that on my exploded diagram. Is there another name for the Joker, or don't all Jabsco macerators have them?

In the exploded parts diagram I have just looked at, the joker valve is in the middle of a set of parts that can be bought as a kit, marked "x", and is not identified separately.  One end is circular and the other end of it is a "Y" shape.  I have another spare one on the boat but I don't have ready access to the boat at present!  When I can I'll post more details.

 

ETA: Ah, I've found the part number I used.  29092-1000.  But there seem to be 4 different versions so you will need to check against your model.  They are relatively (in boating terms) cheap.

Edited by system 4-50
I poo therefore I am.
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13 hours ago, system 4-50 said:

In the exploded parts diagram I have just looked at, the joker valve is in the middle of a set of parts that can be bought as a kit, marked "x", and is not identified separately.  One end is circular and the other end of it is a "Y" shape.  I have another spare one on the boat but I don't have ready access to the boat at present!  When I can I'll post more details.

 

ETA: Ah, I've found the part number I used.  29092-1000.  But there seem to be 4 different versions so you will need to check against your model.  They are relatively (in boating terms) cheap.

Thank you, that's really helpful. I can't remember my exact model so I'll need to look at my manual when I get back to the boat, but I now know what to look for. Thanks again.

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  • 1 month later...
On 06/04/2021 at 23:01, ditchcrawler said:

In my eyes they will always be Collie hats on boat chimneys from now on, Maybe they can be used when not on the chimney to feed the voles or to germinate more cauliflowers ? 

Do you mean coolie?

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