Jump to content

Featured Posts

Our narrowboat on which we will live for the 6 summer months a year is in the process of being built. We will run a washing machine and a TV(Not a drier) and all the other normal things. We want to ensure that we have sufficient power in the evenings when we moor up...although we envisiage we will run the washing machine when we are underway. The engine will be a Beta Marine 43 with twin alternators and a Victron multi inverter charger. Our boatbuilder now recommends gel batteries but an article we have read (in the roadpro catalogue) seems to suggest that these are not the best idea for the following 3 reasons. a) High Relative Cost :D Very Low charging rate and c) Low number of cycles. Would appreciate comments from anyone who has had gel batteries

 

Geoff & Gill Lovegrove

Edited by Geoff & Gill Lovegrove
Link to post
Share on other sites

AGM are better value the battery companies came up with a lot of marketing for GEL and then the big powers in the Marine electrical market whipped the carpet out from under their feet by endorsing AGM rather than GEL.

 

The cycle life of a AGM and a GEL in real world use is so near it does not justify the cost difference for GEL.

 

The battery companies are hitting back by introducing more expensive Deep Cycle AGM batteries that very nearly match the claimed performance and PRICE of GEL batteries.

 

Now putting on the lets make a profit hat then of course GEL batteries are technically superior so how many would you like Sir? :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I would save your money and go for normal deep cycle lead acid batteries.

These will last just as long as any other type of battery provided that they are looked after.

By the I mean, not cycled below 50%, not left uncharged for days on end, kept topped up with distilled water.

I have lived aboard for 13years and am on my 3rd set of batteries each set having lasted about 5 years.

 

One of the main things to consider is the size of the battery bank, to do this you will need to do a power audit to determine how much power you use in a 24hour period, then decide how long you wish to remain in one place without charging, multiply the power consumed in a 24hr period by that number and finally double it and that it the battery capacity you need.

 

Example Parglena needs about 1kWh per 24hrs, so on a 12v system that is 83Ah per day I like to sit for a day or two so thats 166 Ah so the battery bank has to be 400Ah.

 

Oh and I have all the usual stuff inc full size fridge/freezer, washing machine, TV etc, and a stereo that draws far to much current for its own good but sounds great.

 

One tip with the washing machine is wash on a cold wash saves bundles of electricity I have mine modifies (externally) so that when it washes on cold ot takes in water at a pre set temperature from the calorifier so I can do a warm wash without using the heater in the machine.

 

 

J

Link to post
Share on other sites

Our only experence with gell cells was a poor one.

- They came with our bowthruster, from vetus, but failed compleatly in just 2/3years, only to be replaced with wet cell batterys, which went on to do the next 10years.

 

For domestic bank, were also using stright forward batterys, 4*110Ah.

- The first set (exide) lasted about nine years before we replaced them (4*90ah i think)

- Then we had a pair of elecsols for a year, but thats all they lasted for us.

- Now we've got some cheapbrand 110ah units, which are doing all right, still fine after 3years, hofully get a few more yet.

 

 

Daniel

 

Daniel

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not have any experience with batteries (boat on order) but from all the reports and research that I have read and done, I am of the opinion that wet lead acid (deep cycle) are the ones to go for.

 

This is only my opinion :D:D

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not have any experience with batteries (boat on order) but from all the reports and research that I have read and done, I am of the opinion that wet lead acid (deep cycle) are the ones to go for.

 

This is only my opinion :D:D

Gel's can cost 3 times as much as Lead acid, but do they last 3 times longer???

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you considered 2V traction cells, mine should be coming this week. i've managed to get 6 cells (12V system) 480 A/hr for £380. i got an exceptional price because i got them through work (fork truck engineer). but i'm sure if you shop around you could get a decent price, i think they are worth the investment. if looked after they could last 10-15 yrs! but the key is to look after them and regularly check the levels. worth considering along with gel?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.