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Grace and Favour

Yorkshire Gravel Barges - Happier days

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On 31/10/2020 at 19:53, Joe Bourke said:

Dog & Duck

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Does anyone know where the name 'Dog & Duck' comes from?  It sounds like the name of a pub but I've never found anyone who can confirm that. Maybe there was a pub where Viking Marine is.   This location is (or was) earmarked to be the site of the tri-modal Goole Inland Terminal but that seems to have gone quiet.  However the Kellingley pit site is being developed by Harworth Estates into a massive industrial development with much emphasis on rail and water connections.

By the way the barge with the red wheelbox is Inland Navigator (Wynns).

Regards David L

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9 hours ago, fanshaft said:

Does anyone know where the name 'Dog & Duck' comes from?  It sounds like the name of a pub but I've never found anyone who can confirm that. Maybe there was a pub where Viking Marine is.   This location is (or was) earmarked to be the site of the tri-modal Goole Inland Terminal but that seems to have gone quiet.  However the Kellingley pit site is being developed by Harworth Estates into a massive industrial development with much emphasis on rail and water connections.

By the way the barge with the red wheelbox is Inland Navigator (Wynns).

Regards David L

I've seen this 'wheelbox' word on here, is it specific to barges? i'd call it a wheelhouse.

Edited by LadyG

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1 hour ago, LadyG said:

I've seen this 'wheelbox' word on here, is it specific to barges? i'd call it a wheelhouse.

It's the term that seems to be used - maybe a Yorkshire thing.  Of course some of the barges don't have a wheel!

 

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It's certainly the term in general use among people associated with small barges like these. I'd not particularly thought about it before, but we operated a couple of small coastal ships as well as inland barges, and I did more often refer to the steering position as being the wheelhouse on those. I guess that suggests something slightly more sophisticated - I'd hypothesize that the steering position on these craft would originally be a wheel/tiller out on the deck, and some protective covering came later in the form of a simplistic 'box', but that could be complete nonsense. People in most trades have informal words that they use among themselves which make what they do 'special' in some way - look at what happens when newcomers to narrowboating call the thing they steer with a swans-neck when the proper term is ramshead. 🙄

 

Tam

 

p.s. to David - we use the term in the SE too

Edited by Tam & Di

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15 hours ago, fanshaft said:

Does anyone know where the name 'Dog & Duck' comes from?  It sounds like the name of a pub but I've never found anyone who can confirm that. Maybe there was a pub where Viking Marine is.   This location is (or was) earmarked to be the site of the tri-modal Goole Inland Terminal but that seems to have gone quiet.  However the Kellingley pit site is being developed by Harworth Estates into a massive industrial development with much emphasis on rail and water connections.

By the way the barge with the red wheelbox is Inland Navigator (Wynns).

Regards David L

There was a pub of that name there, which is certainly marked on OS maps circa 1900. On this much earlier map, the pub is the building immediately to the east of the Boat Dock, which is where many sloops and keels left their coggie boat, mast and sails when they went up the A&CN under tow.

Goole map.jpg

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15 minutes ago, Pluto said:

There was a pub of that name there, which is certainly marked on OS maps circa 1900. On this much earlier map, the pub is the building immediately to the east of the Boat Dock, which is where many sloops and keels left their coggie boat, mast and sails when they went up the A&CN under tow.

Goole map.jpg

Thanks Mike - I should have thought to ask you!  I wonder when it closed?

David L

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I expect early 20th century. I did copy this OS map, but didn't note its date at the time, which shows some of the proposed alterations, including a link into Dutch River. There were several schemes around 1900/1910. The map does show that the building was a ship's stores associated with the mast depot.

cock boat pond.jpg

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On 31/10/2020 at 15:11, Up-Side-Down said:

It's the wheelbox of another barge. That location is just west of Viking Marine as the A&C enters Goole. Tends to be a resting place for old barges. The bow of Lafarge's old barge Battlestone is against the stern of Fusedale. I think the area is known as Dog & Doublet but it would be good to have confirmation (or otherwise).

Well that was a question well worth the asking. Thanks for all the most informative responses.

Just now, Up-Side-Down said:

Well that was a question well worth the asking. Thanks for all the most informative responses.

And maps!

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I think wheelbox is the right description for this little barge on the R.Nene near Wisbech bit cramped in there.

E44B44DC-1205-46F7-A35F-D9E61DD0C286.jpeg

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On 06/11/2020 at 17:53, Pluto said:

I expect early 20th century. I did copy this OS map, but didn't note its date at the time, which shows some of the proposed alterations, including a link into Dutch River. There were several schemes around 1900/1910. The map does show that the building was a ship's stores associated with the mast depot.

cock boat pond.jpg

I notice there’s a COCK boat pond. My understanding is that they were normally known as COG boats in Yorkshire. Cock boats was more a LIVERPOOL term. Hmm.

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47 minutes ago, Dav and Pen said:

I think wheelbox is the right description for this little barge on the R.Nene near Wisbech bit cramped in there.

 

Exactly!
Do you know what the barge is? It looks like the 'Clinton' that we bought in 1980 from the Nene Barge & Lighter Co. for our grain job on the Thames - seen here on the hard at Isleworth along with Argo's little Dutch barge 'Annie' for a quick bit of blacking. We did put a bigger wheelbox on to pamper our crew - not flash enough to merit the term wheelhouse. It was originally teak, but the late John Duddington decided erroneously he would get through Black Boys Bridge just before the mill without bothering to drop it! The bridge was just 1/2" lower than the wheelbox - we were severely displeased, and our partner Tim knocked up a quick ply replacement just in time for the next load.

 

Tam

 

290673682_09daug81.jpg.5bf63ef0c159ddd36078e343cb42de2c.jpg

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Tam. I always thought that this was your Clinton. It used to carry stone for Bank work on the tidal stretch from a quarry at Wansford.

When we were buying our barge in Belgium on the way back from the dock in Boom I was asked if I had insured it and after saying yes was told if you want a new wheelhouse you can get one at the tunnel under the motorway which has a difficult turn into when the tides going out. It did seem that all the local barges had a nice new aluminum wheelhouse.

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18 hours ago, jenevers said:

I notice there’s a COCK boat pond. My understanding is that they were normally known as COG boats in Yorkshire. Cock boats was more a LIVERPOOL term. Hmm.

I would agree with you. As the map is an OS one, perhaps the person drawing it was from the west coast. The photo shows a somewhat damaged carvel-built MSC cock boat which was given to the Merseyside Maritime Museum over thirty years ago. I think coggies tended to be clinker.

cock boat 957.jpg

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At the 'request' of Associated British Ports (ABP) Farndale H now has a combined plotter and AIS fitted so we can now keep track of her on the tidal river section of her voyage: https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/centerx:-1.4/centery:53.6/zoom:11. Her last position shows up on 23rd November just shy of Trent Falls on her way loaded to Leeds. As there are no AIS receivers along the canal section she will only show up in the river. She is due another run this week so should be away from Goole between 07.00 & 08.00 tomorrow with the tide, which means she can make Hull in under three hours.

 

Ten loads have so far been delivered into Leeds and there is talk of CRT moving funds to cover dredging from next year's budget into this. The river section below Lemonroyd Lock is still a problem, even with several inches of fresh on the Aire and the canal section around the Thwaite Mills Museum (amongst others) is a nightmare, testing the skipper's skills to the utmost. Once the dredging is undertaken (and the surveys are now all complete) 500+ ton loads should become the norm rather the current light loads of 350 tons.

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1 hour ago, Up-Side-Down said:

At the 'request' of Associated British Ports (ABP) Farndale H now has a combined plotter and AIS fitted so we can now keep track of her on the tidal river section of her voyage: https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/centerx:-1.4/centery:53.6/zoom:11. Her last position shows up on 23rd November just shy of Trent Falls on her way loaded to Leeds. As there are no AIS receivers along the canal section she will only show up in the river. She is due another run this week so should be away from Goole between 07.00 & 08.00 tomorrow with the tide, which means she can make Hull in under three hours.

 

Ten loads have so far been delivered into Leeds and there is talk of CRT moving funds to cover dredging from next year's budget into this. The river section below Lemonroyd Lock is still a problem, even with several inches of fresh on the Aire and the canal section around the Thwaite Mills Museum (amongst others) is a nightmare, testing the skipper's skills to the utmost. Once the dredging is undertaken (and the surveys are now all complete) 500+ ton loads should become the norm rather the current light loads of 350 tons.

Ferndale passed my mooring a short while ago so must be now outward bound on the Ouse as we speak.

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1 hour ago, Up-Side-Down said:

At the 'request' of Associated British Ports (ABP) Farndale H now has a combined plotter and AIS fitted so we can now keep track of her on the tidal river section of her voyage: https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/centerx:-1.4/centery:53.6/zoom:11. Her last position shows up on 23rd November just shy of Trent Falls on her way loaded to Leeds. As there are no AIS receivers along the canal section she will only show up in the river. She is due another run this week so should be away from Goole between 07.00 & 08.00 tomorrow with the tide, which means she can make Hull in under three hours.

 

Ten loads have so far been delivered into Leeds and there is talk of CRT moving funds to cover dredging from next year's budget into this. The river section below Lemonroyd Lock is still a problem, even with several inches of fresh on the Aire and the canal section around the Thwaite Mills Museum (amongst others) is a nightmare, testing the skipper's skills to the utmost. Once the dredging is undertaken (and the surveys are now all complete) 500+ ton loads should become the norm rather the current light loads of 350 tons.

image.png.02400dc8b8d986a146fed978c397c8bc.png

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