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Doodlebug

Survived the thames!

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I know, they seemed to be running to a pretty tight schedule, we got further upstream and saw them doing some impressive moves, one would come along to dock as the other was taking off from the other side. It looked like it was timed to the second.

 

It looks closer and smaller than it was, its quite a long way off at this point.

 

DSC_0440.jpg

 

 

That barge is carrying a very big wheel :D

 

 

Ann

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Not really.

 

Welcome to the world of commercial waterways cruising.

 

Dont forget you are entering their work place. They have a job to do you are there for leisure purposes. Cruising on busy commercial waterways is a whole different ball game to ditch crawling.

So, are you saying that commercial craft don't have a duty of care to smaller craft using the river? Of course we should stay as far away as possible from them, but at the same time they cannot swamp smaller boats just because it is their workplace. Bit like saying that it is ok for HGVs to force cars off the motorways.

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You can make the biggest power vessels give way if your in a sailing boat under sail, bit risky though.

Here lies the body of William Gray

Who insisted on his right of way. :mellow:

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I was at a presentation by the PLA recently - the official position is that everywhere on the tidal Thames from Teddington down, every boat and every structure must be prepared and able to deal with waves 1.1m high. So there you have it, direct from the horses mouth!

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So, are you saying that commercial craft don't have a duty of care to smaller craft using the river? Of course we should stay as far away as possible from them, but at the same time they cannot swamp smaller boats just because it is their workplace. Bit like saying that it is ok for HGVs to force cars off the motorways.

 

You are entering the workplace of the large commercial vessels. It is your duty to ensure that your vessel and crew are capable of tackling the conditions presented to you.

 

The commercial craft work to very strict time tables. It isnt practical for them to slow down for every passing pleasure craft. It is the responsibility of the pleasure vessel to ensure that they keep their vessel safe and im afraid if you find a ripple like those shown in the picture a danger then you really shouldnt be out on the tideway. People need to remember that the Thames and other major commercial waterways are not the same as the muddy ditches they are used to cruising.

  • Greenie 3

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We found the clipper skippers very very polite - slowing to an almost stop. We were overtaken by a rubbish barge just leaving limehouse (To be fair he slowed but the wash was still heavy spraying the roof as we turned the bow into the wake).

 

We met the same skipper after he had deposited his barge by Battersea, he did slow but also opened his throttle heavily as he pulled alongside coming back downstream tipping us around a little to say the least !!!

 

This trip was aboard Dads 37ft Springer which we had borrowed as ours was out for repairs - cant say that it would plough the waves much better than your 23 !!!!

 

We have been tipped around more by waterskiers on the Trent in Dads NB, it does seem far more unnerving tho on the Thames !!! Also the clippers are far more maneuverable than a Trent Graveller in the main channel as you come around the bend !

 

I do wonder if the skippers would have slowed down less if we had been in the cruiser - we were aboard a clipper from Greenwich to Westminster over easter, none seemed to slow down for the 2x Binliners Bayliners coming downstream

 

A trip to remember tho eh ? And not that scary that you didnt get pics !

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We found the clipper skippers very very polite - slowing to an almost stop. We were overtaken by a rubbish barge just leaving limehouse (To be fair he slowed but the wash was still heavy spraying the roof as we turned the bow into the wake).

 

We met the same skipper after he had deposited his barge by Battersea, he did slow but also opened his throttle heavily as he pulled alongside coming back downstream tipping us around a little to say the least !!!

 

This trip was aboard Dads 37ft Springer which we had borrowed as ours was out for repairs - cant say that it would plough the waves much better than your 23 !!!!

 

We have been tipped around more by waterskiers on the Trent in Dads NB, it does seem far more unnerving tho on the Thames !!! Also the clippers are far more maneuverable than a Trent Graveller in the main channel as you come around the bend !

 

I do wonder if the skippers would have slowed down less if we had been in the cruiser - we were aboard a clipper from Greenwich to Westminster over easter, none seemed to slow down for the 2x Binliners Bayliners coming downstream

 

A trip to remember tho eh ? And not that scary that you didnt get pics !

Im fairly sure the Binliners would have handled the wash much better than a narrowboat would mind. They are after all sea boats and designed to handle the rough stuff.

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I am not sure that entitles you to irresponsible behaviour. Imagine the defence in court when a white van man had caused an accident "but your honour he was earning a living".

And, whoever said earning a living was more important that any other activity we do.

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And, whoever said earning a living was more important that any other activity we do.

Im afraid I see delivering a load on time and to the tidal restrictions as a much more important activity than a little leisure boat pottering up the river on their annual holiday.

 

Large commercial rivers have a living to keep. Loads have to be in certain places at certain times to keep their place on the loading and unloading schedule. Delays cost time and money for all concerned.

 

Leisure boaters are merely visiting their workplace. If you dont like this then stick to the muddy ditches.

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Im afraid I see delivering a load on time and to the tidal restrictions as a much more important activity than a little leisure boat pottering up the river on their annual holiday.

 

Large commercial rivers have a living to keep. Loads have to be in certain places at certain times to keep their place on the loading and unloading schedule. Delays cost time and money for all concerned.

 

Leisure boaters are merely visiting their workplace. If you dont like this then stick to the muddy ditches.

There's a difference between making an unavoidable wake because of having a job to do, and making one out of a misguided sense of fun...

 

originally posted by Proper Job As we approached Tower Bridge we could see a large tug coming toward us. When I say we could see, we could see a huge bow wave and the super structure of the tug behind it as it punched against the incoming tide. A small self propelled barge was a little behind it.

 

The VHF crackled in to life..

 

so.. are you going to back off?

Nah, came the reply

Youre nasty, retorted the original transmitter

Yep, came the response

 

As I turned in to the wash, the first wave hit us. about 4 feet Id estimate. Liz was on the bow

 

Ocelot didnt budge it just went straight through it. Liz turned her back to the wave and was wet up to the midrift.

 

While she hung on at the front, I would have fallen off the back laughing if I hadnt have had to cope with the following wake. The first wave lifted the bow a little but Ocelot plunged back down the other side. The second raised her a little bit more. By the time we had risen out of the third, the bow rose a good 6 8 feet out of the water before crashing back down. It was like the sub in Das Boot running through an Atlantic swell

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