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Historic Boats for sale online


alan_fincher

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29 minutes ago, monkeyhanger said:

The boat at Stoke Bruerne......Canis Major?   I believe Dodona moors there now, as well.

 

Ah, yes - going back a few years now.

 

Both Canis Major and Dodona are based on one half of a boat, with there also being a Canis and a Dodona elsewhere, being made from the other "half" of each.

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3 hours ago, alan_fincher said:

 

Ah, yes - going back a few years now.

 

Both Canis Major and Dodona are based on one half of a boat, with there also being a Canis and a Dodona elsewhere, being made from the other "half" of each.

The other half of Dodona was between the bottom of Marsworth locks and Peters two the last time I saw it.

 

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23 hours ago, alan_fincher said:

 

Or, of course, as you are the seller, you could instead just have answered any question(s) here.  (Unless the answers are secret, of course).

You never were one to miss the opportunity of spouting absolute misleading rubbish were you?

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39 minutes ago, canalboat said:

You never were one to miss the opportunity of spouting absolute misleading rubbish were you?

Bearing in mind AF's long track record of informative posting, especially regarding historic boats, this is surely a harsh judgement, as well as being unnecessarily brusque.

Edited by Athy
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On 03/09/2022 at 16:37, agg221 said:

Personal choice, but of the three I would go for Badsey. For me, it's about what you end up with and when it comes down to it, Hydrus is a motor conversion of a butty with a lot more to be spent on the fit-out whereas Badsey is a useable boat with a solid history. The extra £50k would go a long way to covering any repair costs arising. Ivy is beautiful, and if I was in a money no object position then I would do it, but for someone without extremely deep pockets it has a lot of ongoing costs to bear in mind.

 

One big issue I have with Hydrus is the decision to fit a wooden cabin. It seems a really odd choice to me on a boat which doesn't have much originality about it, setting up the owner for a lot more maintenance and giving a difficult joint to manage between the cabin sides and the hull. Certainly would not have been my choice. Each to their own if they want to build a boat a particular way, but doing it for sale this wouldn't seem to be the way to maximise appeal to the market.

 

Alec

There are at least two good reasons for the timber back cabin, the first being the internal dimensions being substantially larger with a wooden cabin - particularly relevant on a small boat as the cross bed is above gunwhale height in these. You gain around 4" in cabin width against an insulated steel copy.

 The second is that the owner is an excellent carpenter, another i'd add is a timber cabin is much more pleasant to sleep in.

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On 08/09/2022 at 09:29, IanM said:

 

Someone I know was the one who had the stern put back on it.

 

It's the bit of Gorse which was the BW hire boat (I want to say Water Lupin) which had the original Yarwoods stern lopped off and a square cruiser one put on.  The redundant stern was then made into the other Gorse.  

 

In 2014/15 the cruiser stern was removed from Water Lupin and a rivetted traditional one put back on so there could be more Gorse in this Gorse than the other Gorse!

 

As far as I know nothing was done under the cloths as they had a butty with an under cloth conversion as well.  They sold both about 5 or 6 years ago.

 

Below is the original back end of Gorse.

 

Gorse

 

 

Gorse arrived at Stockton in 2013, with a sheet of plywood bolted on as a (very temporary) transom. The work on the hull/cabin construction finished early 2014 and she was refloated with ours. Have attached a few pictures but couldn't find some of the better ones

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  • 2 weeks later...
12 hours ago, merline said:

Composite? Recent video on Facebook appears to show riveted sides

https://www.facebook.com/groups/591544142195413/permalink/656148012401692/

Not riveted sides - what appear to be rivets are actually the nails which fix the shearing (thin strips of oak fastened vertically on the inside of the hull planking. You can also see the iron knees which are not covered by the shearing.

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1 hour ago, Nick G said:

Not riveted sides - what appear to be rivets are actually the nails which fix the shearing (thin strips of oak fastened vertically on the inside of the hull planking. You can also see the iron knees which are not covered by the shearing.

Ah yes, I see now, thank you!:

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27 minutes ago, spud said:

 

I'm assuming property of chris pink of this forum, (although I don't think he has visited in over a year).

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Quote

"It was built as Triagulum but never had a hard live, acquired by Willow Wren and run together with Greenfinch in the 1960s. "

 

Highly unlikely - where Willow Wren changed the name of a boat, it was to the name of a water bird, of some kind. A greenfinch is not a water bird!

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1 hour ago, alan_fincher said:

 

Highly unlikely - where Willow Wren changed the name of a boat, it was to the name of a water bird, of some kind. A greenfinch is not a water bird!

The only non water bird name I can see in Willow Wren listing is Kestrel, which interestingly, is claimed on the HNBC site boat list to be the name applied to Triagulum!

Edited by furnessvale
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34 minutes ago, furnessvale said:

The only non water bird name I can see in Willow Wren listing is Kestrel, which interestingly, is claimed on the HNBC site boat list to be the name applied to Triagulum!

Yes, correct!  Butty Kestrel is the only example I can think of for a boat renamed by Willow Wren as a bird, but not a water bird.

 

I'm struggling to remember the exact history, but I know that before it was acquired by Willow Wren it was acquired and used in trade by the Wyvern Shipping Company, being renamed as Elizabeth whilst in their ownership, and ultimately sold on to Willow Wren, when it acquired the name Kestrel.

 

Photos published in what should be fairly reputable sources wrongly claim that the boat that was operated by the Wyvern Shipping Company as Elizabeth was in fact GUCCCo Scales.  Pete Harrison has been able to disprove that - the Willow Wren boat was originally Triagulum.

I wonder which (if any) of the names Triagulum, Elizabeth or Kestrel she currently carries?

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4 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

Yes, correct!  Butty Kestrel is the only example I can think of for a boat renamed by Willow Wren as a bird, but not a water bird.

 

I'm struggling to remember the exact history, but I know that before it was acquired by Willow Wren it was acquired and used in trade by the Wyvern Shipping Company, being renamed as Elizabeth whilst in their ownership, and ultimately sold on to Willow Wren, when it acquired the name Kestrel.

 

Photos published in what should be fairly reputable sources wrongly claim that the boat that was operated by the Wyvern Shipping Company as Elizabeth was in fact GUCCCo Scales.  Pete Harrison has been able to disprove that - the Willow Wren boat was originally Triagulum.

I wonder which (if any) of the names Triagulum, Elizabeth or Kestrel she currently carries?

Kestrel

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