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alan_fincher

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Just now, Athy said:

As the advert lists it as "unfitted", there won't be much to see.

 

Even so, I would want to see photos of the "unfitted" interior before driving 100 miles to view the boat, were I interested in purchasing.

 

Especially the inside of the wooden cabin James mentions. 

 

And of course there is much more to see of the steelwork inside, than outside.

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14 hours ago, spud said:

https://narrowboats.apolloduck.co.uk/boat/fellows-morton-clayton-57-traditional-for-sale/711181

 

I remember Ivy from when Mr Riley recovered her from Whatcroft Flash, he completely re-built and shortened her . The hull is made from re-cycled greenheart  and is unlikely to have any rot in it, I would expect  the hull to outlive many  steel boats  of a similar age (about 40 years).

 

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I could live in a back cabin, but not in a slanty sided under cloth 'conversion'. That would rule out BADSEY, though it's well kitted out under the 'cloths'.

At nearly twice the price, HYDRUS looks to be overkill. That slanty thing at the fore end of the cabin would see my cutting disc. Impressive rebuild (or is it 'replica'?). No thanks. I'd be quite happier to have dings and dents, all part of a boats history of a working life. HYDRUS is dead.

And IVY! Apart from the easy to change curved undercloth contraption (catches the imagination as to what a 'cargo' might be) what a pretty thing. I like it. Yes, it's wooden, but I'll wager it's a dream to steer.

Prices? There's now't so queer as folk. I can see the work on HYDRUS has been expensive, but worth £107k unfitted and super smooth sides? A recovering of costs as they escalate beyond dreams?

 

Were I in the 'market', I'd take IVY.

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32 minutes ago, MtB said:

 

Even so, I would want to see photos of the "unfitted" interior before driving 100 miles to view the boat, were I interested in purchasing.

 

Especially the inside of the wooden cabin James mentions. 

 

And of course there is much more to see of the steelwork inside, than outside.

Even so, I suspect that that's the reason.

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Personal choice, but of the three I would go for Badsey. For me, it's about what you end up with and when it comes down to it, Hydrus is a motor conversion of a butty with a lot more to be spent on the fit-out whereas Badsey is a useable boat with a solid history. The extra £50k would go a long way to covering any repair costs arising. Ivy is beautiful, and if I was in a money no object position then I would do it, but for someone without extremely deep pockets it has a lot of ongoing costs to bear in mind.

 

One big issue I have with Hydrus is the decision to fit a wooden cabin. It seems a really odd choice to me on a boat which doesn't have much originality about it, setting up the owner for a lot more maintenance and giving a difficult joint to manage between the cabin sides and the hull. Certainly would not have been my choice. Each to their own if they want to build a boat a particular way, but doing it for sale this wouldn't seem to be the way to maximise appeal to the market.

 

Alec

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I guess the thinking was to create a go anywhere replica woolwich motor. Given that star class boats and in particular the butty boats have middle age spread a lot of work would be required to achieve this. Hyades was a wreck prior, I saw it several times at bottom lock.

So the wooden cabin is part of this goal.

Shame about the engine a national would have been nice.

As for the carbuncle on the front, its not my choice but then thats what the restorer was told to do, and doesnt reflect on their work.

It sounds like a dream gone wrong which is always sad.

 

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15 hours ago, billh said:

I remember Ivy from when Mr Riley recovered her from Whatcroft Flash, he completely re-built and shortened her . The hull is made from re-cycled greenheart  and is unlikely to have any rot in it, I would expect  the hull to outlive many  steel boats  of a similar age (about 40 years).

 

That was 30 years ago, and wooden boats were built for a working life of about 30 years. So it's likely that some significant maintenance may be needed in the not too distant future, as hinted at in the ad.

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15 hours ago, roland elsdon said:

I guess the thinking was to create a go anywhere replica woolwich motor. Given that star class boats and in particular the butty boats have middle age spread a lot of work would be required to achieve this. Hyades was a wreck prior, I saw it several times at bottom lock.

So the wooden cabin is part of this goal.

I remember my small Woolwich butty measured 7' 1.5" inches at the bow without any spread but it could have been pulled in during rebottoming and it might not be that deep at the counter but since all that is left of the original butty is part of the sides and the bow and it looks like a complete steel top to me it can have very little historic interest I suppose. The only advantage I can see is that it is an old boat therefore exempt from all this RCD stuff

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On 23/08/2022 at 11:19, alan_fincher said:

 

"Now with fee mooring"seems fairly meaningless without further clarification.  Even assuming the seller owns the mooring, would there still not be an "end of garden" fee to be paid to CRT?  And even if seller is initially offering the mooring at no additional charge, for how long would that apply?

 

A nice boat, well presented, though.

Those local to Hillmorton Locks know the mooring in the pic as Badsey's Wharf, which is included in the lease of the cafe, formerly known as Badsey's Bistro, and although a number of different boats have been moored there over the years with permission of the cafe leaseholders, as they own Badsey the boat, they have kept it there for about 20 years.  As for "clarification" there is a method, of which you may be unaware, of securing that ......................... ask the seller?

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1 hour ago, canalboat said:

Those local to Hillmorton Locks know the mooring in the pic as Badsey's Wharf, which is included in the lease of the cafe, formerly known as Badsey's Bistro, and although a number of different boats have been moored there over the years with permission of the cafe leaseholders, as they own Badsey the boat, they have kept it there for about 20 years.  As for "clarification" there is a method, of which you may be unaware, of securing that ......................... ask the seller?

So how was it at one time used by boats to use the elsan disposal point by the bridge on the same side

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1 hour ago, Mike Tee said:

 

Absolutely no description supplied, though ?

What is under the cloths ?

 

How much of it is Gorse, given, I think that there is another boat coming from the same original  ?

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On 04/09/2022 at 15:08, canalboat said:

Those local to Hillmorton Locks know the mooring in the pic as Badsey's Wharf, which is included in the lease of the cafe, formerly known as Badsey's Bistro, and although a number of different boats have been moored there over the years with permission of the cafe leaseholders, as they own Badsey the boat, they have kept it there for about 20 years.  As for "clarification" there is a method, of which you may be unaware, of securing that ......................... ask the seller?

 

Or, of course, as you are the seller, you could instead just have answered any question(s) here.  (Unless the answers are secret, of course).

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28 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

 

Absolutely no description supplied, though ?

What is under the cloths ?

 

How much of it is Gorse, given, I think that there is another boat coming from the same original  ?

 

Someone I know was the one who had the stern put back on it.

 

It's the bit of Gorse which was the BW hire boat (I want to say Water Lupin) which had the original Yarwoods stern lopped off and a square cruiser one put on.  The redundant stern was then made into the other Gorse.  

 

In 2014/15 the cruiser stern was removed from Water Lupin and a rivetted traditional one put back on so there could be more Gorse in this Gorse than the other Gorse!

 

As far as I know nothing was done under the cloths as they had a butty with an under cloth conversion as well.  They sold both about 5 or 6 years ago.

 

Below is the original back end of Gorse.

 

Gorse

 

 

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6 minutes ago, IanM said:

 

Someone I know was the one who had the stern put back on it.

 

It's the bit of Gorse which was the BW hire boat (I want to say Water Lupin) which had the original Yarwoods stern lopped off and a square cruiser one put on.  The redundant stern was then made into the other Gorse.  

 

In 2014/15 the cruiser stern was removed from Water Lupin and a rivetted traditional one put back on so there could be more Gorse in this Gorse than the other Gorse!

 

As far as I know nothing was done under the cloths as they had a butty with an under cloth conversion as well.  They sold both about 5 or 6 years ago.

 

Below is the original back end of Gorse.

 

Gorse

 

 

 

Thanks Ian.

 

That's much as my memory though the situation was, but thank you for clarifying.

 

A boat that is 57 feet, but in "working trim", with nothing under the cloths, is a bit of an unusual beast.

It will be interesting to see how easily it finds a buyer, and what they then do with it. 

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34 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

 

Thanks Ian.

 

That's much as my memory though the situation was, but thank you for clarifying.

 

A boat that is 57 feet, but in "working trim", with nothing under the cloths, is a bit of an unusual beast.

It will be interesting to see how easily it finds a buyer, and what they then do with it. 

I’m not buying it, but in principle I would find it quite attractive. It has an interesting history, fits through the whole system and the under cloth area is a blank canvas for a conversion.

 

Alec

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^^^^ exactly as I feel - I have a liking of less than full length old boats, this one (advertised about two years ago with more pics), Princess Ann, and the one that was at Stoke Bruerne for years, name escapes me. And of course Sickle!

plus Dodona, the one at Stockton (can't remember that name either), Madeley (that's due to personal connection as well), there are loads of them...........

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32 minutes ago, Mike Tee said:

^^^^ exactly as I feel - I have a liking of less than full length old boats, this one (advertised about two years ago with more pics), Princess Ann, and the one that was at Stoke Bruerne for years, name escapes me. And of course Sickle!

plus Dodona, the one at Stockton (can't remember that name either), Madeley (that's due to personal connection as well), there are loads of them...........

I can't disagree.

 

In an ideal world when we tried to find our next boat it would have been 57 feet rather than (very nearly) 72 feet. Very hard to find a shortened boat with a conversion, (BCN boats excluded).

 

I suspect you mean Dorado at Stockton, but I can't immediately think of a shortened historic that was kept at Stoke Bruerne.

 

My choice of a shortened boat, if I didn't have Sickle, would be Vesta, I think

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Yes Dorado. The one at Stoke Bruerne  I think  went to a lady who has an involvement with the museum at Ellesmere Port. Maybe it was Princess Ann - memory not what it was, at least thats how I (don't) remember it! It was, however, moored at Stoke for some years, I'm sure somebody on here will remember it better than me.

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42 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

I can't disagree.

 

In an ideal world when we tried to find our next boat it would have been 57 feet rather than (very nearly) 72 feet. Very hard to find a shortened boat with a conversion, (BCN boats excluded).

 

I suspect you mean Dorado at Stockton, but I can't immediately think of a shortened historic that was kept at Stoke Bruerne.

 

My choice of a shortened boat, if I didn't have Sickle, would be Vesta, I think

The boat at Stoke Bruerne......Canis Major?   I believe Dodona moors there now, as well.

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