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alan_fincher

Historic Boats for sale online

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12 minutes ago, Tacet said:

Paddle steamers (full size) seemed to have used oscillating engines. But I think many incorporated mechanical  valve gear rather than Mamod type timing - so were these double-acting too?

 

Slip eccentrics instead of the cylinder itself rocking up and down covering and uncovering steam addmission and exhaust ports.

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3 minutes ago, Captain Pegg said:

I got that from your response to Mike hence my edit. Sorry if you’ve been forming a response all this time.

 

JP

I was just comparing the difference between a single acting vehicle ICE engine and a d/acting steam loco engine, not many folk know this. :)

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12 hours ago, Captain Pegg said:

truck (which I think was the terminology used rather than bogie

A truck has two wheels, a bogie has four.  In English anyway.

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7 minutes ago, Chris Williams said:

A truck has two wheels, a bogie has four.  In English anyway.

Usually called a 'Pony Truck'  no idea why.

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And are there any new historic boats for sale, anybody, please? ?

  • Greenie 1

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40 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

And are there any new historic boats for sale, anybody, please? ?

I do have it on  good authority that the pair (Bainton and ?) at Weedon wharf will be leaving soon!! Although after moving about 6 miles in 19 years I wouldn't want to be the one moving them!!

Edited by matty40s

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16 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Do steam engines have gears then? 

 

 

 

 

 

Traction engines, or at least many of them, do.

So, I think, did those Sentinel shunters which the L.N.E.R. had - though as most of Sentinel's output was for non-railway use, they may just have used the system from their steam waggons.

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16 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

 

Do steam engines have gears then? 

 

Here you go Mike, read all about it. This is Walscherts Valve gear, others are available.

 

Walschaert_static.png
 
The key components of Walschaerts Valve Gear:
  1. Eccentric crank (UK: return crank)
  2. Eccentric rod
  3. Reach rod
  4. Lifting link
  5. Lifting arm
  6. Reverse arm
  7. Expansion link
  8. Radius bar
  9. Crosshead arm (UK Drop link)
  10. Valve stem guide
  11. Union link
  12. Combination lever
  13. Valve stem
  14. Piston valve
Edited by Ray T

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3 hours ago, matty40s said:

I do have it on  good authority that the pair (Bainton and ?) at Weedon wharf will be leaving soon!! Although after moving about 6 miles in 19 years I wouldn't want to be the one moving them!!

Im sure most of the rust will polish off.

Im pretty sure they were around on that pound when we had our mooring on the castle at stowe hill, but they could have been at the end of braunston then. What with the swing bridge boats it was a grand union graveyard for a while

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3 hours ago, matty40s said:

I do have it on  good authority that the pair (Bainton and ?) at Weedon wharf will be leaving soon!! Although after moving about 6 miles in 19 years I wouldn't want to be the one moving them!!

Berkhamsted? Or whatever the spelling is!

 

Dan

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8 minutes ago, stagedamager said:

Berkhamsted? Or whatever the spelling is!

 

Dan

I think the question mark was because many/most people believe this boat to be really Ayr.  Bulls Bridge having switched the identities.

 

Paul

  • Greenie 1

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43 minutes ago, Paul H said:

I think the question mark was because many/most people believe this boat to be really Ayr.  Bulls Bridge having switched the identities.

 

Paul

 

53 minutes ago, stagedamager said:

Berkhamsted? Or whatever the spelling is!

 

Dan

 

I'm fully persuaded that it is the Ayr, not the Berkham[p]ste[a]d.

 

But then you couldn't claim they are the original pairing,if that wee true, of course!

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3 hours ago, roland elsdon said:

Im sure most of the rust will polish off.

Im pretty sure they were around on that pound when we had our mooring on the castle at stowe hill, but they could have been at the end of braunston then. What with the swing bridge boats it was a grand union graveyard for a while

We worked out that they were up near the tunnel for 9 years and then about 10 at Weedon wharf, having sunk several times in the period(not complete sinkings, just under at back end far more than an unloaded boat should be.

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12 hours ago, Athy said:

Er, not as broad as that, I don't think. That would have been a widebeam.

Goodness me - I got the numbers the wrong way round!! 4' 8½" of course!!!

 

Oscillating steam engines have been used in paddle steamers, and can be double acting. The small Mamod engines are also oscillating which are for simplicities sake, single acting, but there are also those which are not oscillating such as the WAVERLEY's engines. Single acting engines are also available, and the original Puffer engines 'puffed' quite markedly as the exhaust is vented directly to the funnel instead of being used in a second or third cylinder as in condensing engines - which the later 'Puffers' were fitted with.

 

WAVERLEY's engines flat out:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfRnQ7duJnA

 

I think describing a double acting single cylinder as being two cylinders is a bit disingenious, as it is one piston inside one cylinder. It does however, have the effect of two power strokes for one complete revolution of the connected flywheel, whereas a single acting steam engine has just one power stroke for one revolution, similar to a two stroke IC engine.

 

An animated example of a double acting oscillating engine:

 

http://www.animatedengines.com/oscillatingsteam.html

Edited by Derek R.

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On 15/05/2019 at 12:52, Chris Williams said:

A truck has two wheels, a bogie has four.  In English anyway.

Having worked in a central line depot, these terms were interchangeable with trucks being the more common reference. 

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3 hours ago, BWM said:

Having worked in a central line depot, these terms were interchangeable with trucks being the more common reference. 

I assume you mean Underground cars.

We were talking about steam engines.  The Yanks call bogies 'trucks'.  and they call trucks 'semi's.

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Tomato - tomato. Truck = lorry. Though Americans also call their pick-ups - trucks.

Semi-truck = articulated lorry. But truck covers most - in the USA.

 

Going back to bogies; Warne's Observers Book of Railway Locomotives of Britain describes leading bogies as bogies when having four wheels, and Pony wheels when there are two. Any trailing wheels are called 'trailing wheel(s)' whether two or four, though BWM's experience shows that the word truck has come into use there.

 

The American businessman Charles Yerkes called the carriages on the Underground 'Cars', and as he was a financier of the Underground - Cars they have remained. Just shows how much some words immigrate and stick, and some don't - not many British cars are called Sedans, a word taken from the French town of Sedan where such chairs originated (so it is said). Funny old world.

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12 hours ago, Chris Williams said:

I assume you mean Underground cars.

We were talking about steam engines.  The Yanks call bogies 'trucks'.  and they call trucks 'semi's.

In the main they would be underground rolling stock 1930's and 60's but the depot also had a number of steam locomotives in for restoration, a number of battery locomotives and a fairly unique early electric loco Sarah Siddons, i believe. They were all described with the same terminology, with the staff in the lifting shop described as working on the 'Trucks' department. 

  We enjoyed a variety of historic rolling stock mainly because of the depot engineer being passionate about them, with extensive links to the Ffestiniogg railway (excuse spelling if wrong, i've never mastered Welsh!).

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5 hours ago, Derek R. said:

Tomato - tomato. Truck = lorry. Though Americans also call their pick-ups - trucks.

Semi-truck = articulated lorry. But truck covers most - in the USA.

 

Going back to bogies; Warne's Observers Book of Railway Locomotives of Britain describes leading bogies as bogies when having four wheels, and Pony wheels when there are two. Any trailing wheels are called 'trailing wheel(s)' whether two or four, though BWM's experience shows that the word truck has come into use there.

 

The American businessman Charles Yerkes called the carriages on the Underground 'Cars', and as he was a financier of the Underground - Cars they have remained. Just shows how much some words immigrate and stick, and some don't - not many British cars are called Sedans, a word taken from the French town of Sedan where such chairs originated (so it is said). Funny old world.

In 1849 the GWR introduced Gooch's 'Bogie Class', as the 4-4-0 'Corsairs' were called.

Early English railways were called 'Railroads' to distinguish them from 'Tramroads' 

 

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I think Dehli dropped off the "Duck" for a while.

 

It is now listed again.....

 

https://www.apolloduck.com/boat/yarwoods-station-boat/573513

 

By sheer chance it says it is at Lymm in Cheshire, which just happens to be where we are also currently moored.  I haven't spotted it yet, though!

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