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Putting in a stove


Chrisy
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Hi all,

 

Having had several problems with my heating I have decided to put in a multi fuel stove.

 

All the stuff I think I need has now arrived but having never put in a stove I am at a bit of a loss with parts.

 

Can anyone tell me the correct way to put together the flu kit and stove. Its really the joints that i'm not sure what to do with.

 

The flu kit has

 

chimney collar for the roof

some lagging

sealent

reducer

and flu

 

I think my question really is which bits do I put the sealent on and what has the lagging ????

 

Sorry if this is a basic question but I only want to do it once :unsure:

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Most people slot the pipes into the collars and then pack with glass fibre rope to make a gas tight seal. The next stage is open to discussion. Many then pack the remainder of the joint with fire cement but i find it tends to crack with pipe expansion and contraction. I use high temperature silicon that may not be rated for the temperates a runaway stove could reach but many of us have had no problems using it. I packed above and below the roof collar.

 

I would be more concerned about how you intend to "fire proof" the areas around the stove and also the the roof lining. I have cut a square out of the roof lining giving at least 6" clearance between chimney and any wood. I replaced the roof insulation in that area with rockwool/glass fibre and then use a fireproof board to make a new ceiling.

 

If the stove is not on legs then I would be concerned about the stove setting the floor on fire. A single layer of tiles over a combustible board is not enough.

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For the back of the stove I am putting a 30mm air gap then heat board then tiles.

For the bottom I anm putting an air gap then heat board, then a cement board and tiling.

 

I have purchased a brass collar for the internal roof lining and intend to cut back the insulation at least 3 inches from the hole and repack with something like fire proof natural wool (if I can source it.

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For the back of the stove I am putting a 30mm air gap then heat board then tiles.

For the bottom I anm putting an air gap then heat board, then a cement board and tiling.

 

I have purchased a brass collar for the internal roof lining and intend to cut back the insulation at least 3 inches from the hole and repack with something like fire proof natural wool (if I can source it.

 

 

Natural wool can never be fireproof. Just find some loft insulation of the rockwool variety. It might melt but it can not catch fire. I got mine from a skip where renovations were being done.

 

I looked the the brass rings for the roof and felt they did allow enough gap[e between wood and pipe for my liking, but many people use them.

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Natural wool can never be fireproof. Just find some loft insulation of the rockwool variety. It might melt but it can not catch fire. I got mine from a skip where renovations were being done.

 

I looked the the brass rings for the roof and felt they did allow enough gap[e between wood and pipe for my liking, but many people use them.

 

Someone had mentioned the wool but your way seems much better. Thank you very much for the advice.

 

Now to cut a hole in the roof :rolleyes:

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[quote name='Tony Brooks' timestamp='1351351384' post='963952'

 

Just find some loft insulation of the rockwool variety. It might melt but it can not catch fire. I got mine from a skip where renovations were being done.

 

 

I used some 1" thick rockwool bats that I got from wickes. Being like boards they were easier to fit which lining out and less likely to sag. I used them to insulate the boat round the stove, the rest was done using fire retardant polystyrene.

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Someone had mentioned the wool but your way seems much better. Thank you very much for the advice.

 

Now to cut a hole in the roof :rolleyes:

 

Woah, before cutting a hole check that there are no cross members or other braces behind the head lining or you might end up cutting through them as well

 

Phil

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Thanks for that. I have been using the soliftec guide but It has still left me a bit unsure about the sealent and lagging on the joints.

Would think the important sealing job was to get the collar sealed to the roof.

If thats wrong you will have to take everything out to get to it!

Plus the location of the hole might be important too - angle and bends in the flue?

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