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Sam

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For now I will assume this is a genuine question but talk of an inexperienced couple building a boat in London rather than fitting out seems a bit strange to me.

 

We need to know what type of wide beam boat, it could men almost anything with a beam (width) of more than about 7ft. You may be fitting out anything from a motor cruiser made form GRP or wood, through a steel or aluminium one to what is probably best known as a wide beam narrowboat that look like a very fat narrowboat.

 

The way the windows may be fitted varies from boat type to boat type and your personal taste. If its a steel or GRP boat typically you will make a suitable cut-out in the side of the cabin and fit an aluminium pre-made  window in the hole using some type of waterproof bedding and small screws or bolts. You could also use rubber glazing gasket and glaze directly into the hole. This will be like older car's windscreens were fitted.

 

People have make or fitted UPVC  and wooden framed windows in such craft but it does nothing to enhance their visual value.

 

I do hope that you have a mooring where you can stay for a long time that allows you to live on the boat. If you think you can just moor up on any bit of canal in London and stay there for days, weeks or months on end you will have a nasty surprise and may potentially loose the boat.

 

 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Jack62 said:

Not really, new to boating. Fishing and sailing ect.

Live in Canada, Visit from time to time.

Never tried canal boats,

Interested in giving it a try, wondering where to start.

 

Probably best to hire for a week or so. Let us know what landscapes/townscapes etc. interest you and we can make suggestions. maybe an idea to say where you will probably fly into so we can take ease of onward transport into account.

 

Any hire fleets recommended here will give you a degree of training but once you get used to the way the boat behaves in the very restricted canal water you should not have a problem. Locking is mainly DIY on our canals but is easy enough once you get your head round the way locks work.

 

 

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Hi Sam here.

 

My parents used to own a boat and spent much of their time on it at the end of their life (sadly they passed away many years ago and the boat was sold). My grandfather was a lockkeeper apparently (but before I was born), living around the Market Harborough area. So I have kind of grown up (well actually I am not sure I have actually grown up!) with narrowboats in my blood. Very fond memories of my mum and dads boat.

 

However, I was the boring one till recently having only hired for holidays. Now at the age of 55 I am going to seek out my own boat in the next year. At the moment I am still working out whether to C.C. full time or have a mooring and be part time boater (living elsewhere).  Also pondering fitting out a sailaway or buy second-hand. In fact, I don't even know if I prefer cruiser, trad or semi trad yet....and as for toilets...no idea!!! So at the moment I am at the "all options" stage, which will be honed in soon. Ive a fair idea on the relative merits of various things, its how other aspects of life unfold that will guide the boat (although that might be the wrong way round perhaps!).

 

I have been watching far too much YouTube and to be honest most of the channels there (of which there seem to be more every single day...is it possible I wonder to have a narrowboat these days without videoing everything and putting it on YouTube?) seem to me to be about just getting people to "click, like and subscribe" and then make comments - I guess to earn money (not all of them of course, and Im not saying there is anything wrong with that either!)  I'm just not convinced I am getting a true picture of narrowboat life that way...or am I ?

 

…..So, I am saying "hi" here to chat with a few folk from the boating community.

 

 

Im sure I will ask numerous dumb questions as I progress, but until then I am looking forward to meeting you all.

 

Sam

 

 

 

 

Edited by SammyB
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1 minute ago, WotEver said:

Hi, and welcome :)

 

As for “fitting out a sailaway or buy second-hand” definitely the latter. You won’t know what you want until you’ve lived with one for a while. 

Yes, that's a good point and also it might come down to timing too.

 

Thank you for your "welcome"......nice to meet you!  ?

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13 hours ago, SammyB said:

Hi Sam here.

 

My parents used to own a boat and spent much of their time on it at the end of their life (sadly they passed away many years ago and the boat was sold). My grandfather was a lockkeeper apparently (but before I was born), living around the Market Harborough area. So I have kind of grown up (well actually I am not sure I have actually grown up!) with narrowboats in my blood. Very fond memories of my mum and dads boat.

 

However, I was the boring one till recently having only hired for holidays. Now at the age of 55 I am going to seek out my own boat in the next year. At the moment I am still working out whether to C.C. full time or have a mooring and be part time boater (living elsewhere).  Also pondering fitting out a sailaway or buy second-hand. In fact, I don't even know if I prefer cruiser, trad or semi trad yet....and as for toilets...no idea!!! So at the moment I am at the "all options" stage, which will be honed in soon. Ive a fair idea on the relative merits of various things, its how other aspects of life unfold that will guide the boat (although that might be the wrong way round perhaps!).

 

I have been watching far too much YouTube and to be honest most of the channels there (of which there seem to be more every single day...is it possible I wonder to have a narrowboat these days without videoing everything and putting it on YouTube?) seem to me to be about just getting people to "click, like and subscribe" and then make comments - I guess to earn money (not all of them of course, and Im not saying there is anything wrong with that either!)  I'm just not convinced I am getting a true picture of narrowboat life that way...or am I ?

 

…..So, I am saying "hi" here to chat with a few folk from the boating community.

 

 

Im sure I will ask numerous dumb questions as I progress, but until then I am looking forward to meeting you all.

 

Sam

 

 

 

 

 

If I were you I would spend a day or two looking at the boats for sale at Whilton Marine.

 https://www.whiltonmarina.co.uk/

 

They have the largest number of boats for sale of any broker, and let you view unaccompanied.

 

You will be able to see every stern type and most layouts, which should help you focus on what you like on a boat.

 

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On ‎24‎/‎02‎/‎2020 at 02:44, Tony Brooks said:

Probably best to hire for a week or so. Let us know what landscapes/townscapes etc. interest you and we can make suggestions. maybe an idea to say where you will probably fly into so we can take ease of onward transport into account.

 

Any hire fleets recommended here will give you a degree of training but once you get used to the way the boat behaves in the very restricted canal water you should not have a problem. Locking is mainly DIY on our canals but is easy enough once you get your head round the way locks work.

 

 

I usually fly into Glasgow where I have family.

Occasionally fly into Heathrow. Probably take train from Glasgow. My though would be a hire for a week, but where? 

Nice Pubs, Locks, Aqueducts, Tunnels, I don't know England, very well but a bit of nice country side, It would all be new to me.

A one way trip if possible, or a circle.

Just don't know where to start.

      

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44 minutes ago, Jack62 said:

I usually fly into Glasgow where I have family.

Occasionally fly into Heathrow. Probably take train from Glasgow. My though would be a hire for a week, but where? 

Nice Pubs, Locks, Aqueducts, Tunnels, I don't know England, very well but a bit of nice country side, It would all be new to me.

A one way trip if possible, or a circle.

Just don't know where to start.

      

For a week's hire, for countryside, pubs and locks, you cant really go wrong aiming for the Warwick/Rugby areas. Both have mainline train stations with the hire bases a short taxi ride away. A lesiurely week from Kate boats in Warwick would give you a trip down to Braunston and back (with a nice tunnel at one end) and Warwick is a nice place to see, or maybe a detour up the south oxford to have a go at the narrow locks. Lots of different hire bases in that area but it can get busy in peak times so avoid the school holidays if you can.

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12 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

If you can forgo the tunnel then Oxfordshire Narrowboats have their base right by a railway station but its a long way from Glasgow. I think there is still a hire base on the Fourth and Clyde canal in Scotland and that one has a boat lift.

 

 

I wouldnt bother with the Forth Clyde or Union canals. Too cold, too wet and no decent pubs. Defo head south for the 'canal' experience. You can do a day trip from Glasgow to see the Falkirk wheel but then try the southern canals.

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57 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

If you can forgo the tunnel then Oxfordshire Narrowboats have their base right by a railway station but its a long way from Glasgow. I think there is still a hire base on the Fourth and Clyde canal in Scotland and that one has a boat lift.

 

 

True but the train service is not good. Neither is the cut south towards Oxford; more like a ditch in places and overgrown

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On 25/02/2020 at 09:59, cuthound said:

 

If I were you I would spend a day or two looking at the boats for sale at Whilton Marine.

 https://www.whiltonmarina.co.uk/

 

They have the largest number of boats for sale of any broker, and let you view unaccompanied.

 

You will be able to see every stern type and most layouts, which should help you focus on what you like on a boat.

 

Thank you …...but funny you mentioned that, but I've just booked a few days off work in a couple of weeks time to do just that ! 

  • Greenie 2
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14 hours ago, Dr Bob said:

For a week's hire, for countryside, pubs and locks, you cant really go wrong aiming for the Warwick/Rugby areas. Both have mainline train stations with the hire bases a short taxi ride away. A lesiurely week from Kate boats in Warwick would give you a trip down to Braunston and back (with a nice tunnel at one end) and Warwick is a nice place to see, or maybe a detour up the south oxford to have a go at the narrow locks. Lots of different hire bases in that area but it can get busy in peak times so avoid the school holidays if you can.

Thanks I’ve heard of Warwick Castle and Rugby but ashamed to admit I don’t know where they are. Oxford a a vague notion. Not really set on any particular feature as a must be other than some old fashioned English pub within a walk for a pub lunch or evening. I will look up and check Kate boats.

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14 hours ago, Dr Bob said:

I wouldnt bother with the Forth Clyde or Union canals. Too cold, too wet and no decent pubs. Defo head south for the 'canal' experience. You can do a day trip from Glasgow to see the Falkirk wheel but then try the southern canals.

I walked and cycled along a good portion of the forth and clyde from Bowling to the center of Glasgow last year. Then took a tour boat on the wheel and walked to the horses . It’s quite a nice walk or bicycle ride. Certainly changed from when I lived in the area.

i was contemplating more the English system some where. For the traditional canal experience

not entirely sure what the traditional canal experience is.  

many years ago I helped crew a sailboat through the Crinan Canal. Which is probably a bit different

  

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10 hours ago, Jack62 said:

I walked and cycled along a good portion of the forth and clyde from Bowling to the center of Glasgow last year. Then took a tour boat on the wheel and walked to the horses . It’s quite a nice walk or bicycle ride. Certainly changed from when I lived in the area.

i was contemplating more the English system some where. For the traditional canal experience

not entirely sure what the traditional canal experience is.  

many years ago I helped crew a sailboat through the Crinan Canal. Which is probably a bit different

  

My son has a house in Polmont (Falkirk) on the non towpath side of the Union canal. Not seen one boat go past when we have stayed there!

Warwick and Rugby are about 20 miles south east of Birmingham - so 80 miles north of London (ish). The Countryside is really nice so a great place to go boating. I mention Warwick and Rugby as both have stations that will be easy to get to from the west coast line and then only a 10 minute taxi ride to the nearest hire boat firm. Personally I would do Warwick as you will get a nice blend of town and country. The first bit is through Leamington Spa which is a really nice town but looks very industrial from the canal! You then get into nice countryside and the bit between Napton and Braunston cant be beat. Some great pubs on the way. If you have time on the way back you can spend some time in the centre of Warwick - and the castle is worth a visit albeit a bit expensive to go in! I think that would be a traditional canal experience.

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Hi all, 

 

Oz Mandius is my name, not real but I like anonymity. As we are coming to a point in our lives where we can cut lose, whilst having a small steady income, and are considering becoming liveaboarders and CCer’s. 
 

Though not making the leap for a couple of years yet, well not until the time is right at least, we are mad keen to put everyone through the wringer for every bit of information, both good and more importantly bad, about choosing this life style. 
 

Whilst new to social media, it’s frowned upon by work, I have joined a couple of Facebook (which I don’t like much) groups, Twitter (I don’t “twat”) and YouTube and am sponging up all I can. 
 

Any hints, tips, warnings or expectation killers would be much appreciated. 
 

All the best 

 

Oz. 

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7 hours ago, Oz Mandius said:

Any hints, tips, warnings or expectation killers would be much appreciated.

Spend many hours wandering around this forum, especially this ‘New to Boating’ section and you’ll pick up more than you knew there was to know. 
 

Oh, and welcome to the forum :)

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On 21/01/2005 at 22:46, mikenovak said:

:lol: Hi

 

My name is Mike.

 

I have recently bought a cabin cruiser (I would have liked a narrow boat but unfortunately, couldn't afford one!).

 

I haven't been out on her yet - and I am really nervous about encountering my first lock.. but I have wanted to do this for many years and hopefully, my wife Cheryl will love the boating life too.

 

I have a question or two on boat maintenance and would appreciate any help anyone could offer?

 

Kindest regards to all

 

Mike

What he said!!

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This topic's all gone a bit quiet lately; there do seem to be a couple of people here just new to boating, but maybe a bit in need of a reply. Although I'm not new to boating (don't own one but I like to crew for others) I try to put helpful answers on here when I can, but have been a bit pre-occupied lately, not least with recovering from surgery in January (so far so good but it depends what the consultant tells me when I see him today!) Anyway:

 

Oz Mandius: Lots of people do enjoy being live aboard CC'ers, but how much  seems to depend on having the right boat for your circumstances, a combination of  knowledge and/or money to maintain it, and especially on where you're going. The big expectation killer is when people want to lurk near to one spot for work, schools, social life etc., especially if that spot happens to be very popular, notably inner London, Bath, Oxford, Cambridge etc. Lots of grief seems to come if you push your luck in such areas by not moving about much, and much discussion has taken place around this forum on that subject.

 

Bronco99: I'm a bit confused by your reply tom mikenovak's post from 2005, and haven't looked up what answer he got at the time, but hope someone told him: if in doubt, wait at the lock until someone else turns up and ask for their advice!

Apparently you have a wife called Cheryl too then like Mr Novak? If so, maybe ask her to read the CRT Boater's guide online (also available in print I think) before you set off, it has good advice about the basics, then when you arrive at your first lock she can handle it well for you, and she should love the boating life.

 

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Hello! Total newbie over here - and I've just bought myself a project boat! Not sure what I've got myself in for,  but I'm excited for the journey. 

My first question - I need to get a multi fuel stove put in the boat. Has anyone done this themselves? Or is this the sort of thing I should just fork out for and get it done by a professional?

I've seen all the rules and regs regarding where it has to be/hearth/proximity to flammable materials etc. 

Any advice would be very welcome!

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13 minutes ago, Patrick Barrett said:

I need to get a multi fuel stove put in the boat. Has anyone done this themselves? Or is this the sort of thing I should just fork out for and get it done by a professional?

Yes lots have done DIY.  Some are better than professional installations, some are a fast route to suicide by asphyxiation.

 

How good are your practical skills - would you literally risk your life on being able to do it correctly?  If so, go for it.  If not, get it done correctly.

 

Oh, and welcome to the forum!

 

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