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Speedwheel

D Bar Rubbing Strake

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I am after some (well 150ft!) 2.1/2 inch (68mm) convex d-bar rubbing strake.

 

Does anyone know if you can still get it?

 

Thanks

 

Mark

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I am after some (well 150ft!) 2.1/2 inch (68mm) convex d-bar rubbing strake.

 

Does anyone know if you can still get it?

 

Thanks

 

Mark

 

Ask the likes of Ian Kemp etc. Do you want square edge (for welding) or feather edge for rivetting or nailing?

 

 

Are you going to tell us what it's for? :lol:

 

 

Tim

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Do you want square edge (for welding) or feather edge for rivetting or nailing?

 

Oh now you're asking. It is going to be welded so I would say square edge.

 

It is for this - France. It it in a bit of a bad way, only the rust clogging the holes was keeping it afloat.

 

RIMG0120.jpg

RIMG0117-1.jpg

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I am after some (well 150ft!) 2.1/2 inch (68mm) convex d-bar rubbing strake.

Does anyone know if you can still get it?

 

Thanks

Mark

I paraphrase.

 

In May 2008 agg221 was saying he found the last supplier of new section 'like' this was in Dundee, and it came in 20ft lengths.

This was his experience while restoring a wooden iceboat named Samson. Perhaps because this boat is wooden, he called them Guard Irons rather than Rubbing Strakes.

 

I hope I'm correct in saying 'new'. I have no doubt there are stocks of 'pre-used' lengths hidden away.

 

Reference for the information above:

http://justcanals.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.ph...start=13#p16707

 

For further information on different sizes found 'not suitable', reference

http://justcanals.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.ph...;p=13644#p13644

 

I cannot find if the person is a member of this forum, although he does appear to use the same name on forums covering different subjects.

 

HTH

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I cannot find if the person is a member of this forum, although he does appear to use the same name on forums covering different subjects.

 

Mine was actually "c" section (so you can get loads of charlie behind it) and I'm afraid it all went to good homes.

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I am after some (well 150ft!) 2.1/2 inch (68mm) convex d-bar rubbing strake.

 

Does anyone know if you can still get it?

 

Thanks

 

Mark

I think convex square edge is what your'e looking for, I use it for handrail on spirol staircases and balcony rails etc

The only thing is I've looked through the stockholders book and the only sizes in there are 2"x1/2" and 1.1/2"x1/2"

Hope this helps

Les

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This was his experience while restoring a wooden iceboat named Samson. Perhaps because this boat is wooden, he called them Guard Irons rather than Rubbing Strakes.

 

Always Guards or Guard Irons in my book (on Narrow boats), whatever the hull material.

 

Tim

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Always Guards or Guard Irons in my book (on Narrow boats), whatever the hull material.

 

Tim

Being new to all this boating thought they were called rubbing strakes

 

Les

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Being new to all this boating thought they were called rubbing strakes

 

Les

 

By a majority vote they probably would be today, just as Ram's Heads would be Swan's Necks, and Boat Shafts would be Poles.

:lol:

 

Tim

(Traditional Old Fart)

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By a majority vote they probably would be today, just as Ram's Heads would be Swan's Necks, and Boat Shafts would be Poles.

:lol:

 

Tim

(Traditional Old Fart)

Don't forget the pins

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Being new to all this boating thought they were called rubbing strakes

 

Les

Guard Irons are metal. Rubbing Strakes tend to be wooden.

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By a majority vote they probably would be today, just as Ram's Heads would be Swan's Necks, and Boat Shafts would be Poles.

:lol:

 

Tim

(Traditional Old Fart)

Hi traditional old fart meet just an old fart :lol:

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Hi traditional old fart meet just an old fart :lol:

I guess that makes me a traditional fart, then, as I'm not quite ready for "old", just yet.

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I guess that makes me a traditional fart, then, as I'm not quite ready for "old", just yet.

Maybe but your getting there by the minute :lol:

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I am after some (well 150ft!) 2.1/2 inch (68mm) convex d-bar rubbing strake.

 

Does anyone know if you can still get it?

 

Thanks

 

Mark

 

A bit of a long shot but you never know:

 

IIRC from his restoration blog, Dove had a bit of a palaver trying to get hold of some of this.

I think that Barry Hawkins had some but wouldn't sell him any.

BH have now folded so where has the stuff gone?

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It is still around and all together but you much chance as seeing god as you have of getting any and no it is not me who has it.

Edited by PaddingtonBear

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I know a modern alternative is to slice a lengthways section out of round tubing to get the right profile might not be a great option but you do end up with the right width of guard iron if its done right.

 

other than that its hours with a very big magnet outside old wooden boatbuilding yards :lol: I have had a quite bit out with the magnet in the past but probably not 150ft.

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My Dad got his strakes formed from thick flat. His look fine, they are hollow to a point of course but they still look good after 25 years. He got his formed by Delph boats but I expect there are alot of metal works that could do it.

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It is still around and all together but you much chance as seeing god as you have of getting any and no it is not me who has it.

 

I got some, shame I don't believe in God.

 

Andrew

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Where do the hull builders get it from, or do they make it themselves ? ( would they appreciate an order ?)

 

Nick

 

There is a rolling mill in Brum that will do it, but you have to order 10 tons minimum. About 4 grands worth when I enquired.

 

Andrew

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Where do the hull builders get it from, or do they make it themselves ? ( would they appreciate an order ?)

 

Nick

 

the 2" x 1/2" x 1/4" square edge convex is easy to get now (it wasn't that way 30 years ago), it's what the new hull builders use. Anything wider is difficult, though.

 

Tim

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There is a rolling mill in Brum that will do it, but you have to order 10 tons minimum. About 4 grands worth when I enquired.

 

Andrew

 

 

If the hull builders are a bit slack at the moment they might be willing to sell off some excess stock ?

 

Nick

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There is a rolling mill in Brum that will do it, but you have to order 10 tons minimum. About 4 grands worth when I enquired.

 

Andrew

 

When I needed some (2" square edge) many moons ago when it wasn't commonly available, it was worth my while to hire a small flat wagon to go & collect about a ton of it from the mill somewhere in the 'greater Birmingham' area, actually watched it being rolled, had to wait for it to cool. Can't remember where it was, though.

A friend needed some, we split the order.

 

Tim

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