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Braunston Historic Boat Gathering


Hairy-Neil
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Kev and I (with newly acquired tans from our holiday oop the Ashby :lol: ) spent the Sunday at Braunston. It was marvellous. Saw the horsey demo, watched the boats, Kev viewed a little Springer that was for sale ("Bullfrog") because he thought it was cute (no we didn't buy it!) and we drank lots of beer and went on a mini pub crawl. Perfect Sunday. Here's some happy snaps of our day at Braunston, for anyone who wasn't there:

 

 

Musicans aboard:

 

June08BoatingHoliday236.jpg

 

 

Nice red one :lol: :

 

June08BoatingHoliday241.jpg

 

 

Quality beardage had by all:

 

June08BoatingHoliday244.jpg

 

 

More ye olde boats:

 

June08BoatingHoliday243.jpg

 

 

Queenie gets her tackle out (as it were):

 

June08BoatingHoliday267.jpg

 

 

More musicians on boats:

 

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Kev and the Cheese Boat:

 

June08BoatingHoliday258.jpg

 

 

Kev aboard the Springer "Bullfrog":

 

June08BoatingHoliday254.jpg

 

 

Sunset over the bridge:

 

June08BoatingHoliday276.jpg

Why is the guy steering Hadley the only one dressed even remotely like a working boatman of the motorboat era ? Well done him.

Cheers

Phil

Edited by Phil Speight
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That puts mine to shame..... :lol:

 

Oh no! Not a beard contest!

 

Apologies for off topic, :lol: but anyone spot the location? (Bet Alan knows)

 

0084aRosie1988.jpg

 

 

 

 

The people steering Queenie (the horse) are too. :lol:

 

Never! Not in those socks!!!

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Oh no! Not a beard contest!

 

Apologies for off topic, :lol: but anyone spot the location? (Bet Alan knows)

 

0084aRosie1988.jpg

If you mean this Alan, it looks kind of familiar, but I'm struggling to place it exactly.

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Oh no! Not a beard contest!

 

Apologies for off topic,

A beard contest? On the Historic Boat Show thread?

 

How much more on-topic can you get?

 

Mine will be shaved off after Hollowell steam rally, at the weekend (another beardy event).

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A beard contest? On the Historic Boat Show thread?

 

How much more on-topic can you get?

 

Mine will be shaved off after Hollowell steam rally, at the weekend (another beardy event).

 

Kev decided to grow his beard while we were on holiday - it got to about 2mm long before he had to shave it off to go back to work! :lol: He was so proud of it I photographed it.

 

June08BoatingHoliday178.jpg

 

Doesn't really compare to Mr Fingerbobs, does it? It only got as far as looking like he needs a bloody good scrub, rather than quality boating beardage. Maybe we need to book a fortnight off work next time!?

 

June08BoatingHoliday301.jpg

 

Kev peeved that he has to shave it off before going back to work. I thought he looked like Papa Smurf like this.

Edited by BlueStringPudding
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If you mean this Alan, it looks kind of familiar, but I'm struggling to place it exactly.

 

O.K. Not a lot to go on - Berko twenty years ago. Behind us the leaning house with the alley between it and what was formerly a coal yard but in this shot the premises of a joinery (now houses), and opposite the site of a barge building yard whose name is on the tip of my tongue but escapes me, and used at the time by Bridgewater Boats since closed. Flats now occupy the barge site, and also Alsfords timber yard which faced the 'Crystal Palace' - which is still there.

 

Just seen Alan's pictures of the horse drawn barge outfit with the Barge yard in the background - and the name still won't come!!!

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Still all

 

:lol:

 

I'm afraid.

 

I'm still struggling to place exactly where you mean, despite having lived in the town much of my life.

 

Names that may be relevant...

 

The woodyard site, where the housing is, and the totem pole remains, was, as you say, latterly Alsfords, but had been Key's for many years before that.

 

The narrowboat and barge builders on that side of the canal were latterly Costins, but it wasn't that originally, and I've forgotten what it started out as.

 

On the other, (towpath) side of the canal, the Horseboat Hotels were attempted to be operated by Mike & Eve, (or possibly Eva?), Baldy, never with much success. The follow up horse trip boat doubtless made far more money, but at some considerable distress to those who lived on the route of it's late night cruises. As far as I'm aware, it was throught it's many years of operation, a totally illegal operation.

 

Hire boats were operated on the towpath side by Red Rose Narrowboats, initially all wooden, outboard powered, centre cockpit cruisers - all had "Rose" names. Their attempts to introduce steel boats, Springers, with a couple of knackered 6HP Evinrude outboards to power 40 foot boats, were, not unsurprisingly, a disaster. I don't know who owned that outfit, but I know that one later highly respected barge builder, latterly marine surveyor, used to turn the boats around on a Saturday!).

 

As you say Mike Foster sold his hire boat business some time back, (thereby providing the area with several of it's "continuous cruisers" still with us). There has been much controversy about what should happen to the site, which includes a wet dock, now derelict. So far applications for housing have been fought and refused.

Edited by alan_fincher
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Still all

 

:lol:

 

The narrowboat and barge builders on that side of the canal were latterly Costins, but it wasn't that originally, and I've forgotten what it started out as.

A search says the original boat builders on the site in Berkhamsted later operated by Costins were Peacock & Willetts, (from 1799).

 

Not a name I think I remember, but that's what it says....

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A search says the original boat builders on the site in Berkhamsted later operated by Costins were Peacock & Willetts, (from 1799).

 

Not a name I think I remember, but that's what it says....

 

Sorry, this has drifted away from Braunston! Costins - that was the name. There's a timber baulk almost ninety feet long and about twelve by four that is purported to have been a rafter from the barge shed still there. It's at ground level and separates the mooring staging from the gravel in front of the flats.

 

In the 'beard' shot, the then joinery business is behind the corrugated, and a 'no mooring' sign is just visible, this was adjacent to the bits of railway line that comprised a vehicle barrier on the towpath.

 

Alsfords sheds across on the left. Crystal Palace in white. About 1990:

1051Pict0067.jpg

 

The Braithwaite 'Yarmouth'. (Well, a bit of it).

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Mine will be shaved off after Hollowell steam rally, at the weekend (another beardy event).

 

Carlt ! I had a shave earlier.

 

I'm going to Hollowell too :lol: - watch out for a nutter in a green mini pickup.

 

Not JP2 powered, but at least I'm in the mix of old stuff belching coal or diesel smoke. Not a catalytic converter (or bow thruster) in sight.

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Really enjoyed the event and it was great to see so many historic boats together, it had a really friendly atmosphere.

 

I was wondering if anyone got a shot of Bargus towing Betelgeuse, unfortunatly my parents and I were all on the boat at the time so only have pictures from on the boat. They were an original pair and it was really great to have them back together, it was also a great experience to tow a butty.

 

goodvm7.th.jpg

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Fair comment.

 

 

 

But is that JP2 a genuine canal boat engine, or a reused impostor from elsewhere, I wonder ?

 

Come to think of it, I wonder how many of the motors that attended are actually powered by something that started life in a working boat ?

 

Quite a small proportion, I'm guessing.....

 

I do wonder how many Lister JPs were actually used in working Narrow Boats. I suspect not very many.

They were very popular in barges in Yorkshire, for instance, but how many in NBs?

 

Tim

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Greg,

 

There are some shots, and a movie of Bargus towing, on the Sickle website.

 

It's listed under Events > Braunston Boat Shows.

I've just watched some of the videos, as we couldn't be at the event.

 

After all the flak flying around on a recent thread, is that forum members wearing baseball caps whilst at the tiller in some of the shots ?

 

Surely not! :lol:

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[

 

 

 

 

Quality beardage had by all:

 

June08BoatingHoliday244.jpg

This is Ian a mate off the T& M :lol:

 

Which lucky boat got 10 points for hitting the coping stones off under Ian's feet then ?? Do you Know????

Edited by VIV SCRAGG
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I've just watched some of the videos, as we couldn't be at the event.

 

After all the flak flying around on a recent thread, is that forum members wearing baseball caps whilst at the tiller in some of the shots ?

 

Surely not! :lol:

 

http://tinyurl.com/5aullb Nice picture credits Sarah. One of the most important legacies that can be carried on without the need for costly paint, steel and wood, is that of working practice. The little things that were done for the very qualitative reason that it was 'best practice'. Cheque books don't buy skill and knowledge handed down through generations, just a little reading, watching and talking - education.

 

Baseball caps? I wonder if an Army blouse was once frowned on, or a trilby in place of a cap? If I'd worn my old crumbling leather backed Donkey jacket and cap found floating in the Aylesbury arm twenty five years ago, would I have looked more 'the part'. or a p**t? As on the traditional clothes thread, the key is on what was/is practical. No hair - wear something to stop sunstroke. As I like to be myself rather than play a part - the cheap baseball cap does the job.

 

But here's a question - Did Joshers really sport a pair of buffalo horns and skulls traditionally? Do they serve a purpose? Surely not!

 

Pride in appearance - or proud to be different? :lol:

 

Enjoyed the weekend - especially Tony Ward's sketches in the Friday Church concert - brilliantly executed!

 

Next year is 27 and 28 June if any one asks.

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Baseball caps? I wonder if an Army blouse was once frowned on, or a trilby in place of a cap? If I'd worn my old crumbling leather backed Donkey jacket and cap found floating in the Aylesbury arm twenty five years ago, would I have looked more 'the part'. or a p**t? As on the traditional clothes thread, the key is on what was/is practical. No hair - wear something to stop sunstroke. As I like to be myself rather than play a part - the cheap baseball cap does the job.

Just to make sure I've not upset anybody, my comment was firmly tongue in cheek.

 

Obviously, much like anywhere else, on the canals people should wear what they feel comfortable with.

 

I can't see a Trilby being a problem - surely that's more or less what Arthur Bray or Joe Skinner were hardly ever photographed without.

 

Or a beret ? Worn both by famous boatmen and boatwomen.

 

My own personal preference for when I'm stood on the back, and it's pi**ing down is a singularly inelegant Tilley hat. Certainly keeps the rain off your head and face.

 

I managed to leave my trusty old one in a pub at Braunston, (I think!), and was horrified when I found what the replacement cost.

 

A.

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Just to make sure I've not upset anybody, my comment was firmly tongue in cheek.

 

Ha Ha! I do rise easy - but did take it in jest. Think I wasn't alone. Did use a trilby once, but some sweet soul washed it. Big straw hat in the Sun, and currently a wet neck in the rain. Great-coats were good in the rain, they'd soak up the water rather than shed it all over the range as PVC's do. Big umbrella's are tops too. My current waxed cotton Marks & Spencer bum length I picked up in the street - all torn and sleeves hanging off - sewed it up, three doses of wax, and it's a gem - right 'gitorfmoiland' vagabond. Won't have none of them green wellies though, big black ones only - but prefer leather.

 

(Now don't go taking that the wrong way!)

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I've just watched some of the videos, as we couldn't be at the event.

 

After all the flak flying around on a recent thread, is that forum members wearing baseball caps whilst at the tiller in some of the shots ?

 

Surely not! :lol:

 

Guilty as charged :lol: , but i'd already burned my nose on the way up and i didn't want my expensive hat to blow off.... unfortunately my ears have peeled twice now.

 

No pictures of us turning at the junction though, or the private boat that got in the way between the Kent and me reversing round the turn on saturday, fairly good round of applause from the audience :lol: .

 

 

The chap from the ice cream shop at bottom lock said we were the only ones to breast up to reverse, can anyone confirm that? i'd never done it before so it just made sence and the turn looked wide enough.

 

Simon

 

Come to think of it, I wonder how many of the motors that attended are actually powered by something that started life in a working boat ?

 

Quite a small proportion, I'm guessing.....

 

Well Bristol started witha National in 1936,

Willow Wren put the Lister HB2 in in the mid to late 60's, which has now been re-built twice, and has now been in longer than the original engine.

 

 

 

Simon.

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