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lil

Living afloat with friends

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Hello all,

I'm currently investigating the living afloat lifestyle and pondering a new boat build but have a few questions (well more than a few but this is a staring point..).

 

Could anyone give me some guidance on whether it's a good idea to buy/build a larger boat with the idea of sharing the space with friends? I am undertaking the project by myself but I don't want to end up living by myself, (I'm the kind of person who has a propensity towards solitude if I don't keep myself in check) would it make financial sense to buy a bigger boat with this in mind?

 

Also, how many feet are we talking about for a boat that could house 2/3 people fairly comfortably?

 

I'm looking forward to help from the wealth of experience that is clearly evident within this forum!

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Bear in mind that one big problem with a boat is that it is very difficult to keep your own space free from others, or to distance yourself from anyone else who is on board. Apart from sharing facilities and common areas, it is usually necessary to walk through each others cabins to get from one end of the boat to the other.

 

The classic canal holiday scenario for example consists of friends who come back not speaking to each other or wanting to be friends any more. And that's only after a week. My wife and I always say that one of the best things about the two of us being on a 67-foot boat is that we can spend the whole day 65 feet apart and not speak to each other!

 

So yes it's perfectly possible but be VERY careful who you share with!

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Hello all,

I'm currently investigating the living afloat lifestyle and pondering a new boat build but have a few questions (well more than a few but this is a staring point..).

 

Could anyone give me some guidance on whether it's a good idea to buy/build a larger boat with the idea of sharing the space with friends? I am undertaking the project by myself but I don't want to end up living by myself, (I'm the kind of person who has a propensity towards solitude if I don't keep myself in check) would it make financial sense to buy a bigger boat with this in mind?

 

Also, how many feet are we talking about for a boat that could house 2/3 people fairly comfortably?

 

I'm looking forward to help from the wealth of experience that is clearly evident within this forum!

 

Sorry to be Mr Grumpy but I wouldn't rely on anyone for anything. Do what you feel is right for yourself and if friends want to give you some dosh to bed down then it is a bonus.

 

When we had our last boat scores of people said 'I wish we could hire it'

 

Sorry was the reply, not licensed blah di blah di blah.

 

We now have a hireboat and guess how many friends have paid to hire it.

 

Big fat none.

 

We haven't lost any friends I hasten to add !!!!

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I think the space would be a big issue. Money is one thing but day to day getting in each others way could make or break the friendship.

Its totally up to you to take the risk but after sharing in various houses, rooms and even garages i don't think it matters really where you are, if your not going to get on you wont no matter how much space you have.

To be totally honest out of all the people i have lived with there is only one who i would consider living with again. We shared a room in Newquay for about 6 months i dont know why it worked but it did. We had only met weeks before we moved in together.

I now live in a 2 bedroom house with bags of space with a guy who i have known for 10 years and as much as I like the guy i cant wait to see the back of that house.

I'm just about to share my boat with my bf who practically lives with me anyway, i am still aware though that living on the boat may affect our relationship even though we have been together for a year and have a really great relationship.

 

As for length of boat... as long as you can afford!

 

Did you have a friend in mind? Maybe not a good option if you would be relying on the income to pay for the boat. Also what is they move off and you cant find anyone else? You may end up sharing your very confined home with a complete stranger just to make ends meet.

Just a few things that poped into my head that you would need to think about.

 

To sumerise... i dont think there is a right or wrong answer. If you are prepared to take the risk do it.

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I would think that if you got a 72ft-er you could arrange it so that you've got your own rooms at either end of the boat with the communal areas in the middle - at least that way you'll be able to have your own spaces when you need to.

 

Edit to add - are you considering Narrow or Widebeam?

Edited by Chris J W

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Hello all,

I'm currently investigating the living afloat lifestyle and pondering a new boat build but have a few questions (well more than a few but this is a staring point..).

 

Could anyone give me some guidance on whether it's a good idea to buy/build a larger boat with the idea of sharing the space with friends? I am undertaking the project by myself but I don't want to end up living by myself, (I'm the kind of person who has a propensity towards solitude if I don't keep myself in check) would it make financial sense to buy a bigger boat with this in mind?

 

Also, how many feet are we talking about for a boat that could house 2/3 people fairly comfortably?

 

I'm looking forward to help from the wealth of experience that is clearly evident within this forum!

 

 

entirely, as you know, your choice. There are however plenty of ways of living alone and not becoming totally solitary.

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entirely, as you know, your choice. There are however plenty of ways of living alone and not becoming totally solitary.

My problem was maintaining the reclusive lifestyle I craved (I failed).

 

You can turn your back on the land-lubbing world but boaters insist on becoming your friends.

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Or buy two shorter narrow boats - solitude when you want it, company when you (both) want it. I feel my 58 footer is too short for friends for more than 24 hours (partners are different - they are friends with a plus)

 

Stickleback

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Sounds like a good idea but probably isn't for all the reasons already stated.

 

If the friendship breaking down leads to the sale of the boat because you have relied on that person providing financil support you are REALLY going to hate each other.

 

What are you going to do if you want to go cruising for a few months and friend can't due to work / life commitments ?

 

What are you going to do if friend brings on friends you don't like ?

 

By all means buy one yourself and invite friends to share the space when it suits you. After all if you end up finding a regular partner a friend not far away will really kill any intimacy - you may be used to living in such confines but your new partner may not - and if the friend doesn't like the partner . . . . .

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Or buy two shorter narrow boats - solitude when you want it, company when you (both) want it. I feel my 58 footer is too short for friends for more than 24 hours (partners are different - they are friends with a plus)

 

Stickleback

 

That's a better idea!

 

The thing is boats are highly personal things. You tend to meet more people when you live on a boat than a house (apart from in winter when it's probably the same). Stickleback's idea is good - you can brest up together most of the time - two or three boats to choose to have dinner on, and take a few days away when the others start to piss you off. Sounds great to me.

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Wow!

that's really got me thinking! Thanks everyone for your input.

I'm contemplating a narrowboat but I haven't fully investigated my options and financial implication yet.

I guess what I need to take into consideration is that the same problems will arise as in a shared house only amplified because of the confined space.

Bones, you make a good point, it is ultimately down to me whether It's lonely or not. My plan is to live on a stretch of canal very close to friends so if I choose to live alone I can have an open door policy!

I think all things taken into account, if I choose to have a friend onboard it will have to be a solid friendship and a big boat.

I also hadn't taken into consideration the flexibility and changeability of living afloat; if I did want to move on or if my circumstances changed I'd a bit tied down by the implications involved for the other person.

When I picture it in my head I picture just myself on my boat and I think that says it all really, so on that note (and to flip this topic on it's head), can anyone give me some hints and tips on living alone afloat?

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When I picture it in my head I picture just myself on my boat and I think that says it all really, so on that note (and to flip this topic on it's head), can anyone give me some hints and tips on living alone afloat?

 

Living alone on a boat is not really that different from living alone on the bank. I've been doing it for the last eight months and just about staying sane! :o

 

Boating alone, though, is a different matter entirely. There's an incredibly steep learning curve that you have to learn in a hurry. But if I managed it, then there's hope for everyone!

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My plan is to live on a stretch of canal very close to friends so if I choose to live alone I can have an open door policy!

 

Hi Lil,

 

if you are interested in being a boat owner, can I suggest that you look into this bit of your plan first. As it is at the moment, there are lots of opportunities to get a boat but not many opportunities to get a mooring in the place that you want. Have you started to research this yet?

 

Richard

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I am all too well aware of the problems of finding a mooring; so many issues and that's before I even think about the boat!

Does anyone have experience of the Bridgwater and Taunton (not Bridgewater- manchester) canal? Ideally I'd reside there, but if not then somewhere along the Bath and Bristol branch of the Kennet and Avon. Is it realistic of me to hope for a mooring this year?

How much of a challenge am I taking on?!

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Chris J W is on the right track, would you share a bed-sit with said friend?

Carl is right "boaters insist on becoming your friends" you will not be lonely unless you have some unsavory habits

Advice you will hear here echo'ed often "Stuff everyone else build the boat YOU want"

My advice "Dont do it"

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Bones, you make a good point, it is ultimately down to me whether It's lonely or not. My plan is to live on a stretch of canal very close to friends so if I choose to live alone I can have an open door policy!

 

I don't think being alone is the same as being lonely, and I certainly dont see solitude as being lonely. I suppose you need to check you are happy in your own company against the elements.

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