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Renting boat unemployed


Jimmy2445

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4 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Lady Barnaby takes her ease knitting over coats for fleas, By this kindness fleas are smitten.  That's why she's very rarely bitten.     Spike Milligan.

 

A hundred hairy savages sat down to lunch

Gobble gobble glup glup, munch, munch, munch 

 

~ Also Spike ~

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Soldier Freddy was never ready. But soldier Neddy was always ready and steady.  That's why when soldier Neddy is outside Buckingham palace on guard in the pouring rain being steady and ready.  Freddy is home in beddy.

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One reason to sign on is to ensure you are registered, as in getting your full pension. 

I had to sign on a few times, I was once cross questioned as to my availability for work as I had a pony which I looked after!

At that time the clerks were told to look at your fingernails as you were obviously gardening or doing other work for cash! Then there was a "training scheme" where you got paid £10 extra plus travel to listen to some other unemployed people tell you how to get in to work. That lasted only a few weeks till the leader actually got a job himself.

For most people who are not on benefits losing their job is pretty disastrous.

 

Edited by LadyG
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6 minutes ago, David Mack said:

A young sardine saw her first submarine;

She was scared as she looked through a peephole.

"Oh come, come, come!" said the sardine's mum,

"It's only a tin full of people".

 

Possibly my fave Spike poetry! 

 

 

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30 minutes ago, LadyG said:

 

For most people who are not on benefits losing their job is pretty disastrous.

 

This is why I got onto benefits aged 48 having never had paid employment in my life. 

 

I judged (perhaps erroneously as it would seem) that getting a job could be detrimental to my future prospects. 

 

Having got a little bit entangled with The System I ask myself whether perhaps getting job 30 yars ago may have been a wise move. 

 

I buried the Family Gold but I can't for the life of me remember where ! 

 

 

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I don't particularly think being a benefit parasite/scrounger is a Good Thing as there doesn't seem to be all that much money in it despite what the Daily Fail might suggest. 

 

I've only got two kids (yes they are state supported as well) so there isn't endless wealth coming from them via Child Benefit (a grand a week) plus their mother lives in a council owned home anyway which is cheap as chips. 

 

No chance of subletting that and the Boats are not worth anything nobody would ever consider such tiny living spaces. The Country Estate is good but I am not the freeholder which is Good and Bad. 

 

If I had my time again I would have done exactly the same things. 

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, MtB said:

 

I know were it is!

 

I mean was....

 

 

 

 

 

I bet you found the 22kt necklace and the diamonds by the gate in Upper Hartfield. Cotchford Lane.

Tell me you didn't. Just down the road from the AA Milne house about 220 yards down the lane on the right. Path into the forest.

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1 minute ago, magnetman said:

 

I bet you found the 22kt necklace and the diamonds by the gate in Upper Hartfield. Cotchford Lane.

Tell me you didn't. Just down the road from the AA Milne house about 220 yards down the lane on the right. Path into the forest.

 

Nope. Nowhere near there. 

 

That was the 'other' gold....

 

 

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Just now, MtB said:

 

Nope. Nowhere near there. 

 

That was the 'other' gold....

 

 

Ah. 

 

I'm worried now that you found it on Hallsmead Ait. 

 

"Bury the Gold on a Thames eyot near Reading nobody will look there" 

 

Then you came along with a metal detector that can tell Gold from ringpulls and tin-containing crown corks. 

 

Foiled ;)

 

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That is why my Gold was buried under several sheets of CoOp tin foil. Metal detector circuits get overloaded and people tune out the bleeping noise. 

 

Moral: Big signal on metal detector = dig. Last time I did this was in 1992 in Bushy park got tired of digging with a trowel and left a hole. Few days later the lady at the bakery said they dug a ww2 bomb out. 

 

I was like ' I knew it was something interesting but a trowel won't do the job".

 

Americans had a base in Bushy park. 

 

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1 minute ago, magnetman said:

That is why my Gold was buried under several sheets of CoOp tin foil. Metal detector circuits get overloaded and people tune out the bleeping noise. 

 

Moral: Big signal on metal detector = dig. Last time I did this was in 1992 in Bushy park got tired of digging with a trowel and left a hole. Few days later the lady at the bakery said they dug a ww2 bomb out. 

 

I was like ' I knew it was something interesting but a trowel won't do the job".

 

Americans had a base in Bushy park. 

 

 

Seriously though, money is fun but I have no need for more than 'enough'. 

 

I haven't bin digging up your gold. And if I found it by haccident, I'd give it back. 

 

 

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13 hours ago, LadyG said:

One reason to sign on is to ensure you are registered, as in getting your full pension. 

I had to sign on a few times, I was once cross questioned as to my availability for work as I had a pony which I looked after!

At that time the clerks were told to look at your fingernails as you were obviously gardening or doing other work for cash! Then there was a "training scheme" where you got paid £10 extra plus travel to listen to some other unemployed people tell you how to get in to work. That lasted only a few weeks till the leader actually got a job himself.

For most people who are not on benefits losing their job is pretty disastrous.

 

Exactly, you have to sign on to get the card stamped else your pension is reduced. Never had a penny out of the social pot.

23 hours ago, Laurie Booth said:

You must work for citizen's advice service )

 

 

23 hours ago, Laurie Booth said:

You must work for citizen's advice service )

 

 

23 hours ago, Laurie Booth said:

You must work for citizen's advice service )

 

Not working anymore, not really.  I had a proper job.  Or are you intimating that I would be of benefit to the Citizens' Advice Service? I don't think that they are ready for me and my views yet.

Edited by Tracy D'arth
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On 05/12/2023 at 20:47, Tracy D'arth said:

On the lead up to Christmas there are loads of jobs going. How can you be overqualified  for a manual, menial job say in a bar or restaurant if you don't say that you are a brain surgeon?

I have taken guys off the dole, given them a crap job, sussed out what they were good at, and given them a new career and a good living.

I would sweep streets rather than have be out of work.

Where is this street sweeping job? Man with two bins on a trolley last seen in 1970.

As for working  in a bar being menial, I generally respect folks who can do this job, cheerful and polite in the face of adversity. I used to work a few shifts, yes it was easy to learn how to pour a pint, maybe change a barrel, but there are other semi skilled jobs, staff management, customer management included.

 I think most people  would prefer serving drinks to cleaning the pub toilets every morning.

Edited by LadyG
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2 minutes ago, LadyG said:

Where is this street sweeping job? Man with two bins on a trolley last seen in 1970.

As for working  in a bar being menial, I generally respect folks who can do this job, cheerful and polite in the face of adversity. I used to work a few shifts, yes it was easy to learn how to pour a pint, maybe change a barrel, but there are other semi skilled jobs, staff management, customer management included.

 I think most people  would prefer serving drinks to cleaning the pub toilets every morning.

Aye, hen, we both go back a long way, G.

Never minded cleaning loos, serving at a bar would wind me up.

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8 minutes ago, LadyG said:

Where is this street sweeping job? Man with two bins on a trolley last seen in 1970.

As for working  in a bar being menial, I generally respect folks who can do this job, cheerful and polite in the face of adversity. I used to work a few shifts, yes it was easy to learn how to pour a pint, maybe change a barrel, but there are other semi skilled jobs, staff management, customer management included.

 I think most people  would prefer serving drinks to cleaning the pub toilets every morning.

Yeah, my street sweeping was fifty years ago. Then I worked in a factory for a year. One of the problems now is those simple labouring jobs, though essential, aren't there any more. And always the problem with casual work was that it messed your benefits up , so you might get a three week job and then have to wait six weeks for the next claim to come through, so your landlord kicks you out and you get a trifle peckish. Getting a job put me on the street once. This seems to be exactly the same with zero hours and Universal Credit. Unusually for government computer systems, it doesn't seem to work very well.

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35 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

.... serving at a bar would wind me up.

I quite liked it, only did a few shifts per week to help out the owner, cash was nice plus roast chicken lunch on Sunday.

Edited by LadyG
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20 hours ago, magnetman said:

Moral: Big signal on metal detector = dig. Last time I did this was in 1992 in Bushy park got tired of digging with a trowel and left a hole. Few days later the lady at the bakery said they dug a ww2 bomb out. 

 

I was like ' I knew it was something interesting but a trowel won't do the job".

Ha if you'd carried on digging, you might have had enough gold to last the rest of your life! 💥

 

8 hours ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Exactly, you have to sign on to get the card stamped else your pension is reduced. Never had a penny out of the social pot.

If it's the NI credits y'all are talking about, those can be purchased. They have to be purchased because they're worth money later, so...  how is getting the credit (stamped card) for free now any different from having a penny out of the social pot which is then saved for your state pension?

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My father's family buried their treasures in their garden.  This was 1939/40ish and the Russians were coming.  It is still there (now part of Ukraine, and the Russians are still coming…).  The principle and most highly cherished item in the collection was a typewriter, I'm told.

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