Jump to content

Beer Glasses


Goliath

Featured Posts

Now I like to keep the same glass. 
Anyone else have this habit?

 

There’s just something about the sticky glass and the built up taste. 
 

Guiness and Lagers I’ll have a fresh glass. Or if I change my beer to a different type I’ll have a fresh glass. 
 

Some pubs will do it, some pubs do it automatically, some you have to ask, some refuse, some don’t give you the chance, some claim hygiene, some claim it’s pub policy not to. 
Some say it’s unhygienic while wiping the back of their hand across their nose and reaching for a fresh glass. 
 

Tulip glass?

it’s a Sleever every time👍
 

All pub side boozers by the way. 
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Years ago when I was helping run the bar at our local yacht club we had new swan necks installed when we changed breweries and they came in to instruct the bar staff on keeping their beer. One of the things that stuck in my mind as a serial glass retainer myself was that we were specifically told not to reuse the same glass due to the hygiene risk of transferring germs from the glass back into the sparkler when pushing the inside of the glass against it to get it under the swan neck.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, magnetman said:

I've got my beer glasses on right now. The world looks wonderful..


always does, it always does..

 

7 minutes ago, Cheshire cat said:

I'm fairly sure that it is illegal not to use a fresh glass. Hygene being the concern. I shall have to do some research

 not telling where I am then 🤓

 

6 minutes ago, gatekrash said:

Years ago when I was helping run the bar at our local yacht club we had new swan necks installed when we changed breweries and they came in to instruct the bar staff on keeping their beer. One of the things that stuck in my mind as a serial glass retainer myself was that we were specifically told not to reuse the same glass due to the hygiene risk of transferring germs from the glass back into the sparkler when pushing the inside of the glass against it to get it under the swan neck.

 


SPARKLERS!!

 

a yacht club wouldn’t know much better I suppose. 

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure about the legality of it TBH, but where the beer is served via a long spout that is partly submerged by the pour, it is conceivable that a previous user may have transferred 'something' via saliva into the glass, which then transfers to the spout and lurks before being washed off by the next pour.  We don't sell real any ale,* most often associated with that type of pump and use short nozzles that don't come into contact with the glass contents for our fizzy beers and ciders.  Default is a fresh glass every time but no argument if you want to keep hold of your first one, as there is a negligible chance of contamination where there is no immersion.  

 

* I wish we did, but our punters don't want enough of it to warrant stocking it, we were chucking out half kegs every week.  'Spoons across the road that we can't and won't try to compete with on price.    

 

Edit to add: I was pretty sure it isn't a specific requirement in law to use a fresh glass each time, and it seems that's the case.  That said if anyone falls ill and can prove the cause was the sort of contamination I've described, you could be in bother, thus the safe practice is to insist on a fresh glass every time for the serve. Nothing stops the punter from keeping their glass and decanting.   

Edited by twbm
  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very bad form to bury the spout of the pump in the beer! That's the problem. If the spout doesn't touch the glass or the beer (which it shouldn't) then there is no risk of transfer of germs.

 

Of course it happens a lot, especially with keg beer, as it's much easier to stop a lively keg beer from frothing up if you bury the spout, and if you're worried about risk of infection you should probably follow the bartender into the khazi to check that he/she washes their hands properly... this could lead to embarrassment depending on the combination of customer/bartender gender.

  • Greenie 2
  • Angry 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When im in UK i am happy to have the same glass for several/many beers, always a sleaver. Where i live now i always ask for a handle otherwise i get something resembling a vase used for church flower arranging about 2 foot high. Fresh glass here every time, in the summer they come out the freezer due to foreign beer not proper ale like in UK.

  • Happy 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, magnetman said:

It does seem a bit obviously dodgy. 

 

I don't do pubs much but on the rare occasions I have I just assumed if I took the glass back they would use a clean one anyway. 

 

Of course the best place for a glass after use is in the fireplace. 


you are right of course but in this energy saving eco culture we live in I see it at as doing my bit to save the planet by saving on washing up. 

“I ain’t caught no bugs..yet” maybe me last words

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Goliath said:


you are right of course but in this energy saving eco culture we live in I see it at as doing my bit to save the planet by saving on washing up. 

“I ain’t caught no bugs..yet” maybe me last words

Changing character portfolio pictures, i like that, interesting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, Bacchus said:

Very bad form to bury the spout of the pump in the beer! That's the problem. If the spout doesn't touch the glass or the beer (which it shouldn't) then there is no risk of transfer of germs.

 

Of course it happens a lot, especially with keg beer, as it's much easier to stop a lively keg beer from frothing up if you bury the spout, and if you're worried about risk of infection you should probably follow the bartender into the khazi to check that he/she washes their hands properly... this could lead to embarrassment depending on the combination of customer/bartender gender.

 

You can't get a proper head unless you use a sparkler, and you can only use a sparkler if it's immersed in the beer.

 

I'm a proud northerner when it comes to beer, and I dislike what my Grandad (from Barnsley) used to call "slaip ale".

 

A clean glass every time, please. 

 

 

Some may disagree.  

They are wrong.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was learning how to drink beer, we always used to take the empty glasses back to the bar as a matter of courtesy. 

 

Is this still a done thing in todays modern world, or is it considered depriving someone of a job?

 

Asking for a friend of a friend. 

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

 

 

I'm a proud northerner when it comes to beer

 

 

Some may disagree.  

They are wrong.

 

 

I drink here with a guy from Newcastle, he gets the right hump if his beer does not have at least 2 inches of head on it, i buy beer not froth, so mine is full to the brim. Im a southerner from Bristol so real ale rules.

1 minute ago, Goliath said:

Ideally all beer would be pulled straight from the barrel up on a rack.

No lines needed, no sprinklers, no swan necks, just lovely pure beer at room temperature.

 

 

A man after my own heart.

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I visited UK last week for 4 days, couldn't stay longer as i only brought 2k with me,😆 Took my old dad to spoons for fish and chips and cheap beer. Before the spoons knockers start its the closest pub to where he lives and the only one he can walk to, hes 91. Drinking Abbot ale at 2.29 a pint, cant beat that.

  • Greenie 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.