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Speedwheel


John Griffiths

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I have used the top wheel from a pillar drill for this in the past. Old fashioned type pillar drill like this 

 

IMG_20230101_195039.jpg.a9b9dfa252e49882e900d8e981cadabe.jpg

 

Obviously you need to find a knackered pillar drill not a really nice one someone might pay good money for. 

 

Lathe control wheels are another option. 

 

 

That is for speed. If you are doing gear change with a wheel it is probably going to want to be a bigger wheel and some sort of reduction gearbox. 

 

Depends what engine/box it is. If it is a hydraulic box then doesn't need any effort.

Edited by magnetman
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Just now, magnetman said:

I have used the top wheel from a pillar drill for this in the past. Old fashioned type pillar drill like this 

 

IMG_20230101_195039.jpg.a9b9dfa252e49882e900d8e981cadabe.jpg

 

Obviously you need to find a knackered pillar drill not a really nice one someone might pay good money for. 

 

Lathe control wheels are another option. 

 

 

Tony Redshaw cast one for me in bronze. 

 

 

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The boatyard at Iver used to stock these. boatman's cabin I think the company was called. 

Also these people for the wheels

 

https://www.blackcountrymetalworks.co.uk/marine-chandlery-boating.htm

 

 

 

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Cheap chinese aluminium control wheels 

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/324293002560

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8 minutes ago, magnetman said:

I have used the top wheel from a pillar drill for this in the past. Old fashioned type pillar drill like this 

 

IMG_20230101_195039.jpg.a9b9dfa252e49882e900d8e981cadabe.jpg

 

Obviously you need to find a knackered pillar drill not a really nice one someone might pay good money for. 

 

Lathe control wheels are another option. 

 

 

That is for speed. If you are doing gear change with a wheel it is probably going to want to be a bigger wheel and some sort of reduction gearbox. 

 

Depends what engine/box it is. If it is a hydraulic box then doesn't need any effort.

 

I reckon that would form the basis for the gear changing mechanism for a Grand Union boat that is short of a mechanism for a gear wheel.

 

It bears more than a passing resemblance to what was there originally.

I'd happily pay a fair price for that - but wouldn't need that wheel you have circled, so that could be passed on to a good home!

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5 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

 

I reckon that would form the basis for the gear changing mechanism for a Grand Union boat that is short of a mechanism for a gear wheel.

 

It bears more than a passing resemblance to what was there originally.

I'd happily pay a fair price for that - but wouldn't need that wheel you have circled, so that could be passed on to a good home!

 

To clarify. It isn't mine. I just did an image search for "hand pillar drill". There are some similar ones on eBay but they don't all look as good. The one I pictured seems to be an unusually nice example ! 

 

I think some people were using the enclosed gearbox type for the Grand Unions. 

This one 

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/265280141214

 

s-l400.jpg

 

Not as pretty. 

Edited by magnetman
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My speed and gear wheels came from Uxbridge Boat Centre.  No idea if theyp still do them.

 

HPC Gears or Davall are good for bevel gears, universal joints and drive components generally.

N

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2 hours ago, Athy said:

Is it the sort of thing which Charity Dock would have stored away in their mysterious premises?

 

Very possibly. But finding such parts there would probably take longer than having new parts made...

 

:)

 

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1 hour ago, MtB said:

 

Very possibly. But finding such parts there would probably take longer than having new parts made...

 

:)

 

I read somewhere that the chap who ran it (Joe Gilbert?) knew where everything was ("A grunge sprocket for a JP2? certainly Sir, third drawer down, left-hand side"). I think the yard is still in the same family but have no idea of their level of stock control.

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On 02/01/2023 at 15:12, Athy said:

I read somewhere that the chap who ran it (Joe Gilbert?) knew where everything was ("A grunge sprocket for a JP2? certainly Sir, third drawer down, left-hand side"). I think the yard is still in the same family but have no idea of their level of stock control.

Charity Dock boatyard was one of the venues visited by salvage expert for the television series "Salvage Hunters".  I may be wrong but seem to recall it was one of those rare occasions whee he came away relatively empty handed, having found very little he thought he could ell on for a profit.  The segment of this particular program gave the distinct impression that the vast amount of stuff in the various piles had nothing to do with canals or canal boats.

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15 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

You don't have to be a dummy there but if you are you must be properly dressed. Lovely place run with imagination.

Its a great place, it was the first place myself and the missus moored when we moved on board. We had to scramble over moored " Boats " and piles of " stuff " to get on and off the boat. Brilliant.

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53 minutes ago, alan_fincher said:

Charity Dock boatyard was one of the venues visited by salvage expert for the television series "Salvage Hunters".  I may be wrong but seem to recall it was one of those rare occasions whee he came away relatively empty handed, having found very little he thought he could ell on for a profit.  The segment of this particular program gave the distinct impression that the vast amount of stuff in the various piles had nothing to do with canals or canal boats.

We follow the exploits of Drew Pritchard and T, and I do recall them visiting Charity Dock. Perhaps it was because so much of the stuff there was spare parts for engines and the like that they didn't find much to interest the antique-buying public. I really can't remember.

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12 hours ago, Tracy D'arth said:

You don't have to be a dummy there but if you are you must be properly dressed. Lovely place run with imagination.

 

I hang around there sometimes, dressed as a 1950s petrol pump....

 

 

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